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Thread: Juzu

  1. #1

    Juzu

    I sat (Burmese, as usual) zazen with my sangha Sunday; during the third round went and sat in daisan. When I arose, ; my "bad" knee went seriously bad, so I spent yesterday in a chair with my leg up on a pillow, or hobbling about on my cane. As I was convalescing, I took the opportunity to execute a project I've had in mind for a while; a Soto juzu.


  2. #2

    Re: Juzu

    Beautiful Piobair.... but I am very ignorant ops: How do you use it??? How many beads does it have (I counted 113)??

    Gassho

  3. #3

  4. #4

    Re: Juzu

    I also have knee problems but have seen dramatic improvement since taking Krill Oil. I recommend the Neptune brand. The 'experts' say their manufacturing process is more advanced.

  5. #5

    Re: Juzu

    Emmet;
    I count 112, including 4 markers (smaller beads. That would be 108 counters and possibly 113; the main bead connecting to the tassle. Was this from a kit or do you select your own beads and go from scratch? As well, are these sandalwood beads?

    p.s. i just depend on exercise and massage to get my knees through the day but, putting them up and making a juzu sounds like an ok idea.

    p.p.s. more on Nenju / Juzu http://bit.ly/irJ2Z6

  6. #6

    Re: Juzu

    That is indeed very attractive.

    But, yes, how do you use it? And did this really help your knee? If so, I need one! :-)

  7. #7

    Re: Juzu

    Hello,

    excellent work. It looks very nice...wish I wasn't so clumsy.

    All the best and gassho,

    Hans Chudo Mongen

  8. #8

    Re: Juzu

    Lovely - I do hope your knee heals soon.

    Gassho

    Willow

  9. #9
    Treeleaf Engineer Seimyo's Avatar
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    Re: Juzu

    Very nice. Almost looks like agate.

    Yes, I'm interested to hear how they are used in context to our practice. When I first started a practice years ago, I used a sandalwood mala to count mantras. The smell alone was calming. I'm missing them now that I talk about it. :?

    Gassho,
    Chris

  10. #10

    Re: Juzu

    Quote Originally Posted by christhatischris
    I'm interested to hear how they are used in context to our practice.
    This has come up several times over the years:

    viewtopic.php?f=1&t=2037&p=29037

    and

    viewtopic.php?f=1&t=60&p=508

    and

    viewtopic.php?f=1&t=4120&p=69028

    Lots to read up on but of course Jundo's posts give the most information on the historical and practical aspects.

    Gassho,

    Dokan

  11. #11
    Treeleaf Engineer Seimyo's Avatar
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    Re: Juzu

    Thanks Dokan, that was interesting.

    Gassho,
    Chris

  12. #12

    Re: Juzu

    No, it's not a kit. It was a generic mala I bought on EBay and re-strung to meet my needs. It's a 108 bead sandalwood juzu with 4 spacer beads and one parent bead; strung with 3 strands. The tassel is a 4-part square braid (doubled) and finished with a Turks-head knot (back in the day I was pretty good at marlinspike seamanship). To the best of my knowledge the beads represent the 108 obstacles to practice, and the ring represents the Dharma, which encompasses them all, but I defer to Jundo's superior knowledge of the subject.
    I will probably use it for counting repetitions; like metta (as one of my teachers once said; "That's not our practice.....(smile)...but it's a very good practice!"), or gathas I'm trying to memorize.
    I found just the making of the juzu itself to be a good exercise in mindful attention and intention.
    My knee's a bit better, although I suspect that ice, NSAIDs, elevation, and my blackthorn stick is somewhat more therapeutic in this case.

  13. #13

    Re: Juzu

    Quote Originally Posted by Piobair
    To the best of my knowledge the beads represent the 108 obstacles to practice, and the ring represents the Dharma, which encompasses them all, but I defer to Jundo's superior knowledge of the subject.
    The ring represents the ring. 8)

    However, I am going to ask around the Soto Zen teachers network, as I do not know the traditional meaning of what the ring is said to represent. I shall report back.

    Gassho, J

  14. #14

    Re: Juzu

    Nice work!

    Too bad to hear about your knee. Hope it gets better soon.

  15. #15

    Re: Juzu

    Hi,

    Let me report back on the mysterious metal ring found on the "Soto-shu" style Juzu (Mala).

    First, I inquired of the many noted American Soto Zen Teachers of the SZBA and ... got a big zero (shaped much like the ring). Then, I called two Japanese priests who were also not sure. Finally, I telephoned to Ando ... the renowned "Hoiya" (literally, "Dharma Tailor") here in Japan, supplier of Kesa, Koromo, Incense and Juzu to all the finest temples in the Land of the Rising Sun. I received a very patient and long explanation that basically came down to ...

    It represents Emptiness (not to be confused with a "zero" however!), crossing through the 108 virtues and defilements ...

    ... and on a more practical level, it is a counter so one does not lose one's place as one is chanting down the beads (not a major Soto practice, but some do so). It is also found on the Joto (Pure Land) Juzu for that reason.

    However, the gentleman has promised to mail me a more detailed, written explanation of all this ... and I will report back here if there is something more there.

    I still am not sure if that is the right answer, but it is an answer ... and as good as any answer, I suppose. In fact, is that not how so many of our ancient Teachings began, with someone educated guessing, misreading, supposing, imagining or just making it up? If that is not the "traditional meaning" of the metal ring ... let it be so from now on!

    Gassho, Jundo

  16. #16

    Re: Juzu

    the 108 defilements for sure.
    I once asked a Soto priest here in Japan and he said we did not use these...


    gassho

    Taigu

  17. #17

    Re: Juzu

    Thank you Jundo and Taigu;
    You take me back to Auditor Training days. During an audit, one researches and investigates a specific procedure by sampling transactions then interviewing the persons involved. Inevitably, you come to asking the question, "Why do you do this or that?" And, invariably, the answer is, "Because we've always done it that way!" :shock:

    And so, without further ado;
    ... let it be so from now on!
    Like it's not as if this sort of approach is without precedent. :roll: :lol: :lol:

    Seriously :|, I wear a 27 bead sandalwood mala (on my left wrist from now on :roll: ) because I like/not like the smell of it My wife is allergic to incense but can tolerate the mala. As well, its presence on my wrist helps with mindfulness training throughout the day. I've tried using beads in prayer and/or chanting and it just doesn't seem to work; as in 'do anything." It could have something to do with witnessing all of those hours long 'Hail Mary' sessions the night before a Catholic funeral. :shock:

  18. #18

    Re: Juzu

    Thanks for the research; I've been looking forward to seeing what you've discovered.
    It will be useful tomorrow. I'll be playing our Center's keisu bells for our local Change Your Mind Day, sponsored by the Buddhist Peace Fellowship. Besides chanting the Heart Sutra, at opening and closing the bells will sound 108 times. I'll play with my juzu in my left hand, and the bai in my right. Considering how long it has taken me to develop the ability to count to 10 reliably, 108 unassisted is a bit of a stretch.
    Sadly, a friend's lover has unexpectedly died. I will carry them when offering incense at his memorial, too.

  19. #19
    I know this thread is very old and inactive but does somehone have an instruction or idea what this knot-string is and how to do it?
    Thanks in advance,
    Gassho, ben
    Lah/st

  20. #20
    Quote Originally Posted by hishiryo View Post
    I know this thread is very old and inactive but does somehone have an instruction or idea what this knot-string is and how to do it?
    Thanks in advance,
    Gassho, ben
    Lah/st
    Hi Ben,

    Which knot do you mean?

    The Juzu generally has a very limited place in Soto Zen compared to the more chanty schools. I can point you to a scholars article on the topic a little later. It will tell you more about the meaning of it all than you ever imagined.

    Here is also a more recent thread with more on the topic too.

    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...l=1#post194472

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  21. #21
    Hello Jundo, thanks for your fast reply. I mean the juzu you posted in the first post http://i138.photobucket.com/q248/PiobBear/001-4.jpg
    there is a knot sling/tassle and im curious how to do this knot:-) also i know that beads are not important for zen at all.
    Gassho

  22. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by hishiryo View Post
    Hello Jundo, thanks for your fast reply. I mean the juzu you posted in the first post http://i138.photobucket.com/q248/PiobBear/001-4.jpg
    there is a knot sling/tassle and im curious how to do this knot:-) also i know that beads are not important for zen at all.
    Gassho
    Oh, Piobair is the only person I know who has made one. You would have to PM him. He stops by here once in awhile, so use this link ... you might catch him.

    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/memb...?12728-Piobair

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  23. #23

  24. #24
    Hi hishiryo,

    In one of his posts above Poibair wrote:

    #The tassel is a 4-part square braid (doubled) and finished with a Turks-head knot (back in the day I was pretty good at marlinspike seamanship)."

    So it is a square braid that is finished off with a Turks-head not. If you google both you can find lots of videos on how to tie them.

    Looking at the knot I think it might also be called a crown knot. Here is a video of someone tying one.



    Here is a page tying something that looks pretty similar to me - but calling it a Turks head

    http://www.paracordguild.com/tie-tur...terminal-knot/

    Gassho, Shinshi

    SaT-LaH
    Last edited by Shinshi; 06-06-2018 at 05:39 PM.
    空道 心志 Kudo Shinshi
    I am just a priest-in-training, any resemblance between what I post and actual teachings is purely coincidental.

  25. #25
    Hello Shinshi,
    thank you for your post. it helped me a lot
    gassho

  26. #26
    Quote Originally Posted by hishiryo View Post
    Hello Shinshi,
    thank you for your post. it helped me a lot
    gassho
    Glad it helped. Good luck with your tying!

    Gassho, Shinshi

    SaT-LaH
    空道 心志 Kudo Shinshi
    I am just a priest-in-training, any resemblance between what I post and actual teachings is purely coincidental.

  27. #27
    If you really, REALLY want to dive into this topic ...

    Prayer Beads in Japanese Sōtō Zen - Michaela Mross
    https://terebess.hu/zen/szoto/prayer-beads.pdf

    He writes:

    When a lay parishioner visits a Buddhist temple, he or she usually carries
    a Buddhist rosary. It marks a parishioner versus the occasional visitor
    and is considered a necessary item of proper attire. For most Japanese,
    not wearing a rosary when putting the hands in prayer or reverence
    seems to be improper. Likewise, the official webpage of the Sōtō Zen
    school instructs lay followers to not forget prayer beads when attending
    funerals or memorial services. Parishioners should further put a rosary
    on the lowest shelf of their home altar, ready to be used during prayers.
    Also, the members of the choirs singing Buddhist hymns at Sōtō temples
    wear short rosaries while singing and playing a bell. Thus, prayer
    beads serve “as sources of identification,” to borrow John Kieschnick’s
    words. The rosary is an especially interesting object because—besides
    the robe or o-kesa—“prayer beads are kept closer to the practitioner than
    any other ritual object. They become physical evidence of faith, devotion,
    and practice.”

    In contrast to Tendai, Shingon, or Pure Land clerics, Sōtō clerics rarely
    use prayer beads in ritual settings. Moreover, images of Zen masters usually
    do not depict monks or nuns holding prayer beads; instead, a fly-whisk
    or another kind of staff signifies their status as a Zen cleric. Therefore,
    Buddhist rosaries are typically not associated with Zen. Nevertheless,
    prayer beads have been used for various purposes in the Sōtō school
    as well.
    A certain emphasis on the Rosary crept into Soto Zen in the centuries after the time of Dogen, as various Pure Land and Esoteric beliefs were brought in during a time when Dogen and Zazen were much more forgotten. For lay people in Soto, the usage has much more to do with attendance at funerals and worship of ancestors at the home Buddhist altar, not Zen practice. So, most westerners will have little need or interest in that aspect of Japanese Buddhism.

    In the west in general, and especially in our Sangha, there is very little emphasis on the beads in Zen groups. Zazen is the centerpiece, and no beads are required for that.

    Also:

    Telling Beads: The Forms and Functions of the Buddhist Rosary in Japan - George J. Tanabe
    https://publikationen.uni-tuebingen....pdf?sequence=1

    Gassho, Jundo

    SatTodayLAH
    Last edited by Jundo; 06-07-2018 at 01:28 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  28. #28
    in Soto, the usage has much more to do with attendance at funerals and worship of ancestors at the home Buddhist altar, not Zen practice. So, most westerners will have little need or interest in that aspect of Japanese Buddhism.
    That's what I had always read. But I've seen a number of people wearing a bracelet mala, perhaps mostly as fashion. I noticed Edward Espe Brown wearing one, as well, which confused me a bit.


    No merit. Vast emptiness; nothing holy. I don't know.

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Todd View Post
    That's what I had always read. But I've seen a number of people wearing a bracelet mala, perhaps mostly as fashion. I noticed Edward Espe Brown wearing one, as well, which confused me a bit.
    I assume that many Westerners (me too sometimes) wear them simply as a re-MIND-er of something ... something wordless and sacred ... as we move through ordinary life. Frankly, not unlike wearing a crucifix on a chain for a Christian, or a "chai" as a Jew.

    Japanese folks also believe that their are protective properties, that certain materials are more "powerful" than others. I don't buy that at all. or believe in some special powers to them beyond the mind. Some can cost the equivalent of hundreds of dollars.
    https://ssl.yasuda-nenju.com/eng/pro...ail.php?no=151

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  30. #30
    I wear a Juzu from time to time, but I neither use it for any practice nor do I think it holds a special power.
    IMHO one should not wear it in order to demonstrate something, as for me Zen is about being oneself without any masks, so for me this should be nothing to "show off".

    However, like Jundo said, it can act as a reminder. I got my latest Juzu during a visit in the Buddhist Centre in Manchester (UK).
    So when I am somewhere there are situations in which I notice the Juzu and it makes me stop and take a deep breath (i.e. I become mindful of the current situation). And other times I think about that nice visit in Manchester. ;-)

    Gassho,

    Daitetsu

    #sat2day
    no thing needs to be added

  31. #31
    IMHO one should not wear it in order to demonstrate something, as for me Zen is about being oneself without any masks, so for me this should be nothing to "show off".
    Good point. I've probably taken this to an extreme. Aside from my Zafu, my Zabuton, and my Rakusu I have no other artifacts that represent my practice. I've thought, from time to time, of getting a Buddha statue or some how decorating an altar but I know it would be a source of attachment for me. Maybe someday if I find a Buddha statue that really speaks to me I'll get it. (side note: I used a stone in the place of a Buddha statue during Jukai)

    Meanwhile if all of life is really our temple then everything is significant in its own way. I actually find it to be a reminder of my practice to NOT have an anchor.

    Not judging. Just sharing my perspective.


    Tairin
    Sat today
    Last edited by Tairin; 06-08-2018 at 03:11 PM.

  32. #32
    Member Seishin's Avatar
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    Think I must be the opposite to Tairin, as we've a house (and garden) full of varying Buddha statues, mainly picked up by my wife who only has a passing interest (but likes ornaments and went through an oriental phase some years back). My altar was finished after Jukai.

    As to mala/juzu I wear a few on each wrist which I find acts as a reMINDer for me as Jundo puts it but they are not used during sitting or ceremonies. Interestingly, reading this post, I thought I'd count each juzu as I was sure they all had 18 beads and one mother/Buddga bead/block/bead+tassle. No doubt due to the vagaries of eBay I found the those with the blocks only have 17 smaller beads so I guess these do not count. No doubt there will be another Japanese bad luck number I've fallen foul of, if I added up the totals .................................


    Seishin

    Sei - Meticulous
    Shin - Heart

  33. #33
    Like Tairin, I've resisted my interest in getting a juzu because I fear it's just a desire to outwardly project an attachment to Zen (which may or may not be a good thing, depending).

    But, then yesterday, I was talking to someone who suggested I should have some reminder to hold my tongue when I am tempted to impulsively critique my work colleagues.

    Hmm. A re-MIND-er. Where have I heard that before?


    No merit. Vast emptiness; nothing holy. I don't know.

  34. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Todd View Post
    Like Tairin, I've resisted my interest in getting a juzu because I fear it's just a desire to outwardly project an attachment to Zen (which may or may not be a good thing, depending).

    But, then yesterday, I was talking to someone who suggested I should have some reminder to hold my tongue when I am tempted to impulsively critique my work colleagues.

    Hmm. A re-MIND-er. Where have I heard that before?
    Anything can be a desire/attachment; anything can be a reminder. It all depends on whether we allow it or not. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    Sat/LAH
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

  35. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Todd View Post
    Like Tairin, I've resisted my interest in getting a juzu because I fear it's just a desire to outwardly project an attachment to Zen (which may or may not be a good thing, depending).

    But, then yesterday, I was talking to someone who suggested I should have some reminder to hold my tongue when I am tempted to impulsively critique my work colleagues.

    Hmm. A re-MIND-er. Where have I heard that before?
    I feel that it is okay to be "attached" to Zazen and the Dharma, but then again, one holds even such attachment so lightly that the word "attachment" does not really apply. Perhaps "cherishing" and "taking refuge" would be a better description.

    Also, although we do not proselytize so much in western Zen (I can't say that for all Zen folks everywhere today or in the past ... the Buddha, Ta Hui, Dogen, Master Keizan, the folks who wrote the Platform Sutra and others were big proselytizers ... but most western Zen folks are pretty low key), there is no reason not to show others what is in one's heart if one wishes. I would not hide it either if one does not wish to hide. Neither hide nor brag, neither be excessively prideful nor fail to take some moderate pride. For example, in the work place, I might not talk overly or at all about Buddhism any more than I would want to hear about Jesus and Moses from my Christian or Jewish co-workers. However, what is wrong with putting a bumper sticker on one's car, a t-shirt or wearing Juzu if one wishes? I mean, Buddhist temples don't hide ... Buddhist priests don't wear a disguise ... so what is really wrong about showing that one is Buddhist a bit?

    Moderate "pride" is not a problem if one also feels that everything in the universe, every star and grain of sand, can shine in being that star or grain of sand and feels your "pride" about them too. I think even Dogen and Buddha must have felt a certain "pride" in the communities they built and in their teachings. Just keep it low key, and mix with vast amounts of humility about oneself too.



    NOTE: No endorsement for the above, by the way, just examples. Also, I discovered the Buddhists need funnier bumper stickers.

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    Last edited by Jundo; 06-10-2018 at 12:05 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  36. #36
    there is no reason not to show others what is in one's heart if one wishes.
    Thank you, Jundo. This was very helpful.


    No merit. Vast emptiness; nothing holy. I don't know.

  37. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by Todd View Post
    Like Tairin, I've resisted my interest in getting a juzu because I fear it's just a desire to outwardly project an attachment to Zen (which may or may not be a good thing, depending).
    Hmmm... I feel obliged to respond to this. I never said anything about “outwardly project an attachment”. My Zen practice is not anything I advertise or hide. When I referred to “attachment” in my post above it was addressing my predilection towards attaching undue significance to things. I find it easier and more appropriate to my practice to keep it simple. I don’t think there is anything wrong with having statues or figures of Buddha around. If it helps your practise then go for it. If a juzu helps your practice then go for it. For me though I find the absence of this things better to focus my practice. Even then perhaps I am attached to my austerity

    There is no one right way here but it certainly wasn’t my goal to attack or diminish what works for others.


    Tairin
    Sat today & LAH
    泰林 - Tai Rin - Peaceful Woods

  38. #38
    I might not talk overly or at all about Buddhism any more than I would want to hear about Jesus and Moses from my Christian or Jewish co-workers.
    This is generally how I think when I get the urge to reach out to others about Buddhist practice, or make mine more overt. I keep hearing about simple everyday anxieties my co-workers or friends have, and immediately want to open up with the Four Noble Truths or Emptinesand figure that's no different to their ears as someone suggesting they should pray to Jesus. One of the things that actually drew me to Buddhism is how, at least in the west, there's no one drawing me to it. Buddhists write books that make it into the "Eastern Spirituality" section of the bookstore but not much else.

    Having random buddha statues in your house is actually completely normalized in western society now so I find it amusing that if people saw one in my house or on my desk at work, they'd probably not suspect a thing. Just today I passed by a home decor store with a giant buddha head in the window, the size of a small table. I think the most I might ever do is 3D print a buddha statue (made of PLA, a cheap and common 3D printing plastic which can be directly recycled and easily biodegrades, knowing it will someday be discarded) since the crafting of the object might work around my personal aversions.

    3D printing also opens the door to some really unique designs:
    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2007063
    And even... more... unique... designs...........
    https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2938548

    Gassho,
    Kenny
    Sat Today

  39. #39
    I suppose I don't have a traditional use or meaning to my 4 mala.
    I've a Rudraksha seed mala to remind me of my connection to the earth and universe.
    I have a sandalwood mala that I modified by removing the "swastika" bead from the middle and sewing 2 spokes to the 6 sided wheel to make a dharmachakra. This mala reminds me of my ego. (It wasn't good enough, so "I" changed it)
    My third mala is made of yak bone. It reminds me of my connection to the cycle of life and death.
    My last mala is small, made of sandalwood. I wear it to remind me of my connection with my daughter. She is an extension of my soul, a close tether on a web that connects us all.
    I have used them to chant. I've used them to focus on my breath. I've held them close in moments of immense personal pain and moments of pure joy. The most important thing is to do whatever helps your practice. Everything else is just fluff

    Gassho,
    Alexander
    ST/LAH

  40. #40
    Sorry if I misinterpreted your words or projected my own dilemma onto what you were saying, Tairin.

    Gassho


    No merit. Vast emptiness; nothing holy. I don't know.

  41. #41
    Daily I wear a neck mala and a wrist mala. They serve as a reminder for patience, being open minded, listening more than talking etc... The wrist mala also serves as a "fidget" toy as I will often do some silent mantra during meetings or when I am waiting on something.

    I have a small alter at home and a micro buddha statue at work. Keeping these things as a reminder has never been an issue.

    The only time I feel religion or practice can be an issue is when it is being forced on others. This is what pushed me so far from Christianity to begin with. Telling someone "your going to hell unless you believe X" is never going to open a good and healthy line of communication.

    It is not the items but the keeper of them that create issues.

    James F
    Sat

    Sent from my SM-G920V using Tapatalk

  42. #42
    Quote Originally Posted by Todd View Post
    Sorry if I misinterpreted your words or projected my own dilemma onto what you were saying, Tairin.

    Gassho

    Tairin
    Sat today
    泰林 - Tai Rin - Peaceful Woods

  43. #43
    Iíve had several strings, and even made one with kukui nuts (since they were used by polynesian culture for lamp oil, they are symbolic of enlightenment) Iíve given two away, one that I ordered an extra one by accident, another, a half mala, when the full one broke and I couldnít find all the beads to repair. One made of bodhi seeds I left on my motherís casket before burial.
    At first, before becoming more adept at shinkantaza, I used one to count my breaths, though now when I do it like that it is for defusing anger or stressful moments. Mostly I wear it as a reminder as others have said.

    Gassho
    Sat
    Marc Connery
    明岩
    Myo̅ Gan - Bright Cliff

    I put the Monkey in Monkeymind

  44. #44
    Hi Jundo,

    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    Also, I discovered the Buddhists need funnier bumper stickers.
    I remember we had a Treeleaf T-Shirt years back. Wouldn't it be nice to have a revival of those (besides bumpber stickers)?


    Gassho,

    Daitetsu

    #sat2day
    no thing needs to be added

  45. #45
    Shingen, didn't we put the t-shirts up somewhere? On the donations page? I forget, and can't find them now. Anyone is welcome to download, donation or not, and make a t-shirt. It is a gift for donors, although no requirement to donate either.



    Gassho, Jundo

    SatTodayLAH
    Last edited by Jundo; 06-11-2018 at 11:02 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  46. #46
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    Shingen, didn't we put the t-shirts up somewhere? On the donations page? I forget, and can't find them now. Anyone is welcome to download, donation or not, and make a t-shirt.



    Gassho, Jundo

    SatTodayLAH
    Hey Jundo,

    Yes we used to have a section for that, but it seems to have faded into the universe. In any event, here is the AI (Illustrator) file and layout file if anyone would like to take it and make a t-shirt for themselves. Special thanks for Kyonin for the design. =)

    [Jundo: Scroll down our donation page and you will find the link]
    http://www.treeleaf.org/donations-to-treeleaf-sangha/

    If you run into any issues, please let us know. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    Sat/LAH
    Last edited by Jundo; 06-11-2018 at 11:00 PM.
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

  47. #47
    Thanks Shingen.

    Sorry about the upcoming war with Canada.

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  48. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    Thanks Shingen.

    Sorry about the upcoming war with Canada.

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    Your welcome ... and no worries, we will just charm our Southern neighbours with politeness. LOL



    Gassho
    Shingen

    Sat/LAH
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

  49. #49
    Treeleaf Unsui / Engineer Sekishi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Hello all,

    The Illustrator file has also been added to the donation page: http://www.treeleaf.org/donations-to-treeleaf-sangha/

    And incidentally, many of us south of the Canadian border are actually pretty kind and polite ourselves. Sorry for the mess. Hopefully we will get it cleaned up soon...

    Deep bows,
    Sekishi
    #sat #lah
    sekishi
    石志

    As a novice priest-in-training, this is simply an expression of my opinion. Please take it with a grain of salt.

  50. #50
    Quote Originally Posted by Sekishi View Post
    And incidentally, many of us south of the Canadian border are actually pretty kind and polite ourselves.
    I think this statement is applicable to more then just out borders ... but world ones. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    Sat/LAH
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

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