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Thread: [Ecodharma) ACTIVE HOPE Chapter Six (part two)

  1. #1

    [Ecodharma) ACTIVE HOPE Chapter Six (part two)

    This week’s section is p108 to the end of chapter six (p115)

    Here Joanna talks about the power of emergence that come from ‘power with’:

    1. The power of our inner strength
    2. The power arising from co-operation with others
    3. The subtle power of small steps leading to a large impact
    4. The energising power of an inspiring vision

    She sees these emergences of power as not always being predictable and contribute to not needing to know the outcome. As we say in Zen, the action itself is enough, if it comes with good intention, and we let the outcome take care of itself. We let the power flow through us rather than having an egoic ownership of it, and shift our thinking from one of ‘I’ to a more collective ‘we’ as we work together with others towards a shared vision of the future.

    Joanna says that the three ways we can open to ‘power with’ are

    1. To hear a call to action and answer it
    2. To understand power as a verb
    3. Drawing on the strengths of others


    This leads to three suggestions for exercises. If you wish, use one of these (or more if you would like) as an exploration for this week:

    1. A letter from Gaia

    The Australian rain forest activist John Seed suggests an exercise called ‘a letter from Gaia’ in which we imagine the earth talking to us and telling us what she needs. If you prefer just to use ‘the earth’ or ‘mother earth’ rather than Gaia, feel free to do that.

    2. Open sentences that empower

    Use these sentences for self-reflection:
    “I empower myself by…”
    “What empowers me is…”

    3. Identify your own strengths or the strengths of others

    Write about strengths you have found in yourself as you do this work. As Joanna says, this is not a self-centered exercise but rather a way of helping others see the same strengths within themselves. Also, think about strengths you see in others which helps you to continue this work.


    I would like to say that something that empowers me is this group and you all coming here each week to respond to prompts and share your ideas and answers. Having that gives me strength to continue.

    Deep bows for your practice
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  2. #2
    reading this chapter made me remember a saying by William of Orange. He was the leader of the revolt of the small Dutch republic against the Spanish:

    One need not hope to undertake, nor succeed to persevere (translation Dutch to English by Google)

    aprapti


    sat

    hobo kore dojo / 歩歩是道場 / step, step, there is my place of practice

    Aprāpti (अप्राप्ति) non-attainment

  3. #3
    One need not hope to undertake, nor succeed to persevere
    I like that quote a lot! Thank you for sharing.

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  4. #4
    Thank you Kokuu

    Ill consider this chapter and respond to later but for now

    She sees these emergences of power as not always being predictable and contribute to not needing to know the outcome. As we say in Zen, the action itself is enough, if it comes with good intention, and we let the outcome take care of itself. We let the power flow through us rather than having an egoic ownership of it, and shift our thinking from one of I to a more collective we as we work together with others towards a shared vision of the future.
    The more we talk about this the more I think this is the key for me. As Ive said elsewhere I tend toward being a perfectionist and one of the classic traits of a perfectionist is that we tend to be hesitant to start unless we know we can have an optimal (perfect) outcome. Which to say we tend to procrastinate and delay any actions for fear of doing it wrong.

    I can not solve the crisis we are in by myself and I can not know at this moment the outcome of any actions. Rather than wait for all this clarity I know I just need to start doing what needs to be done.


    Tairin
    Sat today and lah

  5. #5
    I can not solve the crisis we are in by myself and I can not know at this moment the outcome of any actions. Rather than wait for all this clarity I know I just need to start doing what needs to be done.
    Yes! It is taking me time to get this one as well. Action is better than no action and tends to accumulate momentum so we don't have to wait for that perfect opportunity to get involved.

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  6. #6
    Reading some of the comments above reminds me of the following quote from Pirkei Avot (Ethics of our Fathers) which is part of the Mishnah, the Jewish oral Torah:

    "He [Rabbi Tarfon] used to say: It is not your duty to finish the work, but neither are you at liberty to neglect it.."

    I also came across the following Maori phrase recently when reading something about regenerative farming which seems it would fit with John Seed's teachings:

    “Ko au te whenua, ko te whenua ko au – I am the land and the land is me.”.

    Drawing on the readings from this and the previous section I've been thinking about how we are building the groundswell of support for change in environmental policies. I realised that almost all areas of my life are taking steps my across society to address this. At work all the projects have to submit plans to show how they are minimising impact. At my daughter's school this is being taught to the kids from their first years, and my wife just returned from helping with their eco club. As I mentioned previously, we are constantly trying to implement policies that protect our environment through the town council I am a member of.

    Yesterday my mother in law, who gets her news from right wing British newspapers and TV channels, tried to tell us that climate change is natural but as she spoke those words I realised how out of place they sounded with how almost everyone else I know would think and speak.

    We need to speed up change but even reading the business pages of the newspaper I realised they are full of stories about big corporations trying to outperform each other in getting electric vehicles on our roads, and how governments are being forced to re-think their reliance on fossil fuels. While this isn't necessarily changing the way people think about themselves in relation to the planet, change is happening and that groundswell is building thanks to the small acts we're all taking.

    Gassho,

    Heiso

    StLah

  7. #7
    Thank you, Kokuu.
    I imagine if Gaia wrote to me, they would say, “we need only for you to realize who and what you are. All follows from that.”
    What empowers me is connecting with others and being inspired by them.
    Gassho,
    Naiko
    stlah
    (Sorry for the brevity; I’m a bit unwell this week.)

  8. #8
    I imagine if Gaia wrote to me, they would say, “we need only for you to realize who and what you are. All follows from that.”
    Yes! I remember a Native American elder being asked how we could heal the Earth and he said that she is perfectly capable of healing herself, we just need to stop making her sick.

    I hope you feel less unwell soon, Naiko.

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  9. #9
    Reading some of the comments above reminds me of the following quote from Pirkei Avot (Ethics of our Fathers) which is part of the Mishnah, the Jewish oral Torah:

    "He [Rabbi Tarfon] used to say: It is not your duty to finish the work, but neither are you at liberty to neglect it.."

    I also came across the following Maori phrase recently when reading something about regenerative farming which seems it would fit with John Seed's teachings:

    “Ko au te whenua, ko te whenua ko au – I am the land and the land is me.”.
    I really like both of those, Heiso! Thank you for sharing.


    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

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