Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 8910
Results 451 to 467 of 467

Thread: Chanting & Zazen Circle

  1. #451
    i am a Sasaki fan, Yuki.
    so: good idea!!



    aprapti

    sat

    hobo kore dojo / step, step there is my place of practice


    Aprāpti (अप्राप्ति) non-attainment

  2. #452
    Quote Originally Posted by aprapti View Post
    i am a Sasaki fan, Yuki.
    so: good idea!!



    aprapti

    sat
    Homeless Kodo Sawaki.

    NOT the infamous Joshu Sasaki.

    Gassho, Jundo

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  3. #453
    Member Yuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Chicoutimi, Québec, Canada
    Aprapti, I think you typed the wrong character because you are always the one quoting Kodo Sawaki…



    Yuki (雪)
    Sat today

  4. #454

  5. #455
    Quote Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
    Aprapti, I think you typed the wrong character because you are always the one quoting Kodo Sawaki…
    Homeless Kodo Sawaki.

    NOT the infamous Joshu Sasaki.

    Gassho, Jundo
    aah.. I am glad some people read my posts.. but i meant Sawaki indeed..



    aprapti

    sat

    hobo kore dojo / step, step there is my place of practice


    Aprāpti (अप्राप्ति) non-attainment

  6. #456
    Member Yuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Chicoutimi, Québec, Canada
    Hi everybody !


    Today, reading of the Song of the grass roof hermitage plus our usual chants.

    See you !

    Yuki (雪)
    Sat today

  7. #457
    They sound lovely as ever ! Merci Yuki !


    '' A flower falls, even if we love it;
    the weeds grow, even if we don't love it.''
    - Dogen


    ''Thinking about the past...
    Long days ago
    One after another. All the more
    The spring of my life.''

    - Buson Josa ( 1716-1783)


    Have a Great Week Ahead

    See You


    Deep bows
    STLah

  8. #458
    Have a poem by Rengetsu that reminds me of my friends here.

    Mimegumi no
    fukaki nioi mo
    uchi soi te
    itodo medetaki
    yamazakura kana.

    The deep fragrance
    of your compassion
    accompanied by
    such a wonderful branch
    of mountain cherry blossoms!

    Gassho,
    William
    Sat

  9. #459
    Member Yuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Chicoutimi, Québec, Canada
    Hi everybody !

    Tomorrow, Wednesday, we will celebrate the day of the Buddha’s awakening.
    For this special occasion, we will read the following text during our meditation period :

    ______________________________

    [The Buddha’s Pari-nirvana Admonition Outline Sutra (Buddha’s Willed Teaching Sutra) says:]

    The first awakening is to have few desires. To refrain from widely coveting the objects of the five-sense desires is called “few desires.”

    The Buddha said, “Monks, know that people who have many desires intensely seek fame and gain; therefore they suffer a great deal. Those who have few desires do not seek fame and gain and are free from them, so they are without such troubles. Having few desires is itself worth-while. It is even more so because it creates various merits: Those who have few desires need not flatter to gain others’ favor. Those who have few desires are not compelled by their sense organs; they have a serene mind and do not worry because they are satisfied with what they have and do not have a sense of lack. Those who have few desires experience nirvana. This is called ‘few desires.’ ”

    The second awakening is to know how much is enough. Even if you already have something, you set a limit for yourself for using it, so you should know how much is enough.

    The Buddha said, “Monks, if you want to be free from suffering, you should contemplate knowing how much is enough. By knowing it, you are in the place of enjoyment and peacefulness. If you know how much is enough, you are content even when you sleep on the ground. If you don’t know it, you are discontent even when you are in heaven. You can feel rich even if you are poor. You can feel poor even if you have much wealth. You may be constantly compelled by the five-sense desires and pitied by those who know how much is enough. This is called ‘to know how much is enough.’”

    The third awakening is to enjoy serenity. This is to be away from noise and confusion, and stay alone in a quiet place. Thus, it is called “to enjoy serenity in seclusion.”

    The Buddha said, “Monks, if you want to have the joy of serene nondoing, you should be away from the crowds and stay alone in a quiet place. A still place is what Indra and other devas revere. By leaving behind your relations as well as others’, and by living in a quiet place, you may contemplate the conditions of suffering. If you are attached to the crowds, you will receive suffering, just like a tree that attracts a great many birds and gets killed by them. If you are bound by worldly matters, you will drown in troubles, just like an old elephant who is stuck in a swamp and cannot get out. This is called ‘to enjoy serenity in seclusion.’”

    The fourth awakening is diligent effort. It is to engage ceaselessly in wholesome practices. That is why it is called “diligent effort.” It is refinement without mixing in other activities. You keep going forward without turning back.

    The Buddha said, “Monks, if you make diligent effort, nothing is too difficult. That is why you should do so. It is like a thread of water piercing through a rock by constantly dripping. If your mind continues to slacken, it is like taking a break from hitting stones before they spark; you can’t get fire that way. What I am speaking of is ‘diligent effort.’”

    The fifth awakening is not neglecting mindfulness. It is also called maintaining right mindfulness. This helps you to guard the dharma so you won’t lose it. It is called “to maintain right mindfulness” or “not to neglect mindfulness.”

    The Buddha said, “Monks, for seeking a good teacher and good protection, there is nothing like not neglecting mindfulness. If you practice this, robbers of desire cannot enter you. Therefore, you should always maintain mindfulness in yourself. If you lose it, you will lose all merits. When your mindfulness is solid, you will not be harmed even if you go into the midst of the robbers of the five-sense desires. It is like wearing armor and going into a battlefield, so there is nothing to be afraid of. It is called “not to neglect mindfulness.”

    The sixth awakening is to practice meditation. To abide in dharma without being confused is called “stability in meditation.”

    The Buddha said, “Monks, if you gather your mind, it will abide in stability. Then, you will understand the birth and death of all things in the world. You will continue to endeavor in practicing various aspects of meditation. When you have stability, your mind will not be scattered. It is like a house where water is used sparsely, or an embankment that holds water. You practitioners are like this. Because you have the water of wisdom, « you practice stability and the water of wisdom is not wasted. This is called ‘stability in meditation.’”

    The seventh awakening is “to cultivate wisdom.” It is to listen, contemplate, practice, and have realization.

    The Buddha said, “Monks, if you have wisdom, you are free from greed. You will always reflect on yourself and avoid mistakes. Thus, you will attain liberation in the dharma I am speaking of. If you don’t have wisdom, you will be neither a follower of the way nor a lay supporter of it, and there will be no name to describe you. Indeed, wisdom is a reliable vessel to bring you across the ocean of old age, sickness, and death. It is a bright lamp that illuminates in the darkness of ignorance. It is an excellent medicine for all who are sick. It is a sharp ax to cut down the tree of delusion. Thus, you can deepen awakening through the wisdom of listening, contemplation, and practice. If you are illuminated with wisdom, even if you use your physical eyes, you will have clear insight. This is called ‘to cultivate wisdom.’”

    The eighth awakening is not to be engaged in hollow discussions. It is to experience realization and be free from discriminatory thinking, with the thorough understanding of the reality of all things. It is called “not to be engaged in hollow discussions.”

    The Buddha said, “Monks, if you get into hollow discussions, your mind will be scattered. Then, you will be unable to attain liberation even if you have left the household. So, you should immediately leave behind a scattered mind and hollow discussions. If you wish to attain the joy of serenity, you need to cure the sickness of hollow discussions. This is called ‘not to be engaged in hollow discussions.’”

    From
    Treasury of the True Dharma Eye: Zen Master Dogen's Shobo Genzo
    84 : EIGHT AWAKENINGS OF GREAT BEINGS

    _________________________

    See you soon !

    Yuki (雪)
    Sat today

  10. #460

  11. #461
    Member Yuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Chicoutimi, Québec, Canada
    Hi everybody !

    Thanks to you William ! I read the Rengetsu poem today !

    For our new Russian’s friends :
    You can find most of the texts we are using at Chanting and Zazen Circle in those threads. I wish it could be useful for you !

    Thread #12
    Sanki Raimon (English)


    Sandokai can be found in the Treeleaf Chant book - that we use for Weekly and Monthly Zazenkai.

    Maka Hannya Haramita Shin Gyo In thread #31

    Zen Master Hakuin's Chant in Praise of Zazen * (Hakuin Zenji Zazen-Wasan, a traditional Rinzai chant) In thread #70

    HAKUIN ZENJI ZAZEN WASAN (Japanese ) in thread #149

    Sanki Raimon in Japanese. in thread #115

    Shi Gu Sei Gan Mon (The Four Vows in Japanese)

    SHU JO MU HEN SEI GAN DO

    BON NO MU JIN SEI GAN DAN

    HO MON MU RYO SEI GAN GAKU

    BUTSUDO MU JO SEI GAN JO

    The four vows (French) in thread #162

    the Four Vows (Portuguese) in thread # 166

    the Four Vows (Dutch) in thread # 167

    The four vows (Norwegian) in thread #260

    Silent lllumination by Hongzhi Zhengjue (English) #163
    Silent Illumination (French) #169

    Paroles de tous les jours / Words for Each Day (French/English) #295

    And I add this short chant used for opening the Sutra verse :

    « The Dharma is deep and lovely,
    We now have a chance to see it,
    study it, and practice it.
    We vow to realize it’s true meaning. »

    Mujô jinjin mimyô hô
    hyaku senman gô nan sôgû.
    Ga kon kemmon toku juji.
    Gange nyorai shinjitsu gi.

    Song of the Grass-Roof Hermitage (English) In thread #145 and (Japanese) #238

    Contemplating Mind by Hanshan Deqing (English) in thread #174


    Yuki

    See you soon,


    Yuki 雪
    (Sat today)

  12. #462
    Quote Originally Posted by Yuki View Post
    Hi everybody !

    Tomorrow, Wednesday, we will celebrate the day of the Buddha’s awakening.
    For this special occasion, we will read the following text during our meditation period :

    ______________________________

    [The Buddha’s Pari-nirvana Admonition Outline Sutra (Buddha’s Willed Teaching Sutra) says:]

    The first awakening is to have few desires. To refrain from widely coveting the objects of the five-sense desires is called “few desires.”

    The Buddha said, “Monks, know that people who have many desires intensely seek fame and gain; therefore they suffer a great deal. Those who have few desires do not seek fame and gain and are free from them, so they are without such troubles. Having few desires is itself worth-while. It is even more so because it creates various merits: Those who have few desires need not flatter to gain others’ favor. Those who have few desires are not compelled by their sense organs; they have a serene mind and do not worry because they are satisfied with what they have and do not have a sense of lack. Those who have few desires experience nirvana. This is called ‘few desires.’ ”


    _________________________

    See you soon !

    Yuki (雪)
    Sat today
    That is for Buddha's death day (Pari-Nirvana), not his Enlightenment day under the Bodhi Tree. Just so you know. Parinirvana is usually remembered in February.

    The very last time he spoke the Dharma, ... He lay between the twin Sala trees and was about to enter (final) Nirvana.
    It is fine to Chant if you wish, however, as any moment is birth, any moment is death, any moment is enlightenment.

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    Last edited by Jundo; Today at 12:15 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  13. #463
    May I ask a question, to our Chanters?

    When you meet, how much of the period do you spend Chanting, and how much Sitting?

    Gassho, Jundo

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  14. #464
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    May I ask a question, to our Chanters?

    When you meet, how much of the period do you spend Chanting, and how much Sitting?

    Gassho, Jundo

    STLah
    My schedule only allows me to sit on Saturdays with this group, but usually it's a pretty even split. There's usually 5-10 minutes of friendly chatting while everyone joins, and then 20 minutes of chanting (depending on how long the reading is) then there's usually 30 minutes of zazen, with a couple haiku at the end.

    Gassho,
    William
    Sat

  15. #465
    Member Yuki's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2016
    Location
    Chicoutimi, Québec, Canada
    Thanks for this precision Jundo.
    When we met, we sit 27 minutes, chant and do some reading (zen texts and haikus) for around 15 minutes. Usually, the event last around 50 minutes ( or more, if peoples stay for chatting at the end).

    Gassho,

    Yuki 雪
    (Sat today)

  16. #466
    Quote Originally Posted by Shinshin View Post
    My schedule only allows me to sit on Saturdays with this group, but usually it's a pretty even split. There's usually 5-10 minutes of friendly chatting while everyone joins, and then 20 minutes of chanting (depending on how long the reading is) then there's usually 30 minutes of zazen, with a couple haiku at the end.

    Gassho,
    William
    Sat
    That sounds like a good sitting.

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  17. #467
    Hey Jundo,

    Yes the only thing that is really set in stone is the half hour of sitting the rest of it is a bit freeform jazz.



    Gassho

    Ryokudo

    SAT/LAH

Page 10 of 10 FirstFirst ... 8910

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •