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Thread: Just as they are?

  1. #1

    Just as they are?

    I was driving home today listening to the Zen Studies Society podcast ep "The Precious Gifts of the Dharma" and the speaker said something that hit me like a load of bricks. I am paraphrasing but it was to the effect of when you think things shouldn't be in a certain way a light should go on that tells you to stop and practice (such as relying on your practice experience) . Think why it is we think this way and why shouldn't it be just as it is. Just thought I'd share.


    Gassho
    Kaisho

    Stlah

    Sent from my SM-A205U using Tapatalk

  2. #2
    Quote Originally Posted by Kaisho View Post
    I was driving home today listening to the Zen Studies Society podcast ep "The Precious Gifts of the Dharma" and the speaker said something that hit me like a load of bricks. I am paraphrasing but it was to the effect of when you think things shouldn't be in a certain way a light should go on that tells you to stop and practice (such as relying on your practice experience) . Think why it is we think this way and why shouldn't it be just as it is. Just thought I'd share.


    Gassho
    Kaisho
    I like to say that we radically and thoroughly accept all things "just as they are" ... and yet, some thing, we do not. Accepting thoroughly, yet not accepting, as if seeing the world two ways at once out of two eyes (maybe that third eye too ), with all eyes open at once offering clarity.

    So, if one has cancer ... accept it thoroughly and completely without resistance, letting the cancer just be the cancer ...

    ... and also, sit Zazen beyond all cancer or no cancer, dropping all thoughts of sickness vs. health, life and death ... sitting in a place of wholeness beyond all cancer or no cancer, death or no death ...

    ... then do NOT accept one's cancer, give it the good fight, sometimes be sad or afraid, and take one's radiation or chemo ...

    ALL AT ONCE, AS ONE.

    Gassho, J

    STLah

    PS - This is not unrelated to the essay I posted elsewhere today:

    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...-Conclusion%29
    Last edited by Jundo; 02-18-2021 at 03:34 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  3. #3
    Thanks Jundo, I will give it a read.

    Gassho
    Stlah

    Sent from my SM-A205U using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    I like to say that we radically and thoroughly accept all things "just as they are" ... and yet, some thing, we do not. Accepting thoroughly, yet not accepting, as if seeing the world two ways at once out of two eyes (maybe that third eye too ), with all eyes open at once offering clarity.

    So, if one has cancer ... accept it thoroughly and completely without resistance, letting the cancer just be the cancer ...

    ... and also, sit Zazen beyond all cancer or no cancer, dropping all thoughts of sickness vs. health, life and death ... sitting in a place of wholeness beyond all cancer or no cancer, death or no death ...

    ... then do NOT accept one's cancer, give it the good fight, sometimes be sad or afraid, and take one's radiation or chemo ...

    ALL AT ONCE, AS ONE.

    Gassho, J

    STLah

    PS - This is not unrelated to the essay I posted elsewhere today:

    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...-Conclusion%29
    Yes, dropping resistance to the current reality doesn't mean that we don't make an effort to make things better.

    Gassho,
    Sat Today,
    Geerish.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Guish View Post
    Yes, dropping resistance to the current reality doesn't mean that we don't make an effort to make things better.

    Gassho,
    Sat Today,
    Geerish.

    You just described why I avoided the path for many years. It was my misunderstanding of just this.

    Doshin
    St

  6. #6
    I think it's useful sometimes to differentiate between the two kinds of acceptance: acknowledging what's present, and giving up. I think, usually, when we talk about acceptance in Buddhism we mean the first kind (acknowledging what's present) because it's where we begin with anything - we try to clearly assess the present situation and just accept it for what it is. This does not mean we give up, we do nothing (although sometimes it's appropriate to do nothing), or that we just resign our autonomy.

    Gassho
    Kyōsen
    Sat|LAH
    橋川
    kyō (bridge) | sen (river)

  7. #7
    I mean I agree with the expressed main vein of idea here that we radically accept while working to do what needs doing.

    My unexpressed thought was really relating to the idea that just because I think a thing shouldn't be in a certain way or state that I should analyze why through the lense of practice. Really what came to mind is an interaction I had some years ago when I was just beginning to practice with a zendo in Atlanta where I didn't think reciting the Heart Sutra in Japanese was a good idea. I later understood it was because tradition and a tying to the roots of the teacher, culture and practice. It was a wild thought at the time for me.

    Gassho

    Sorry for the length.

    Sat|LAH
    Kaisho

    Sent from my SM-A205U using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    I would say that we so radically accept, so thoroughly allow, so fully drop all demands for change, that nothing is lacking, all is complete, there is not a drop to fix and no work to be done whatsoever ...

    ... all while we (from another eye) do not accept what is wrong, do not allow faults or injustice, want change for problems and illness, know that some things are lacking and we need to fill the hole, realize that there is more work to do to get to our target ...

    ALL AT ONCE

    ... as if knowing life two ways at once, as one way out of two eyes, both eyes open at once providing perspective and clarity.

    "Accepting" and "not accepting" are not, as most folks believe, either/or propositions. Instead, Zen practice teaches us that the two seemingly contradictory perspective can be held at one.

    It is something like seeing dust in a filthy house, realizing each grain of dust as a shining jewel, seeing that each grain of dust is in exactly its beautiful spot in the universe with no place to move, realizing that the filthy house is lusciously and glowingly filthy ...

    ... yet grabbing a broom and sweeping up the house because, well, it is filthy and needs to be cleaned.

    (Sorry for running long)

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    I would say that we so radically accept, so thoroughly allow, so fully drop all demands for change, that nothing is lacking, all is complete, there is not a drop to fix and no work to be done whatsoever ...

    ... all while we (from another eye) do not accept what is wrong, do not allow faults or injustice, want change for problems and illness, know that some things are lacking and we need to fill the hole, realize that there is more work to do to get to our target ...

    ALL AT ONCE

    ... as if knowing life two ways at once, as one way out of two eyes, both eyes open at once providing perspective and clarity.

    "Accepting" and "not accepting" are not, as most folks believe, either/or propositions. Instead, Zen practice teaches us that the two seemingly contradictory perspective can be held at one.

    It is something like seeing dust in a filthy house, realizing each grain of dust as a shining jewel, seeing that each grain of dust is in exactly its beautiful spot in the universe with no place to move, realizing that the filthy house is lusciously and glowingly filthy ...

    ... yet grabbing a broom and sweeping up the house because, well, it is filthy and needs to be cleaned.

    (Sorry for running long)

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    Beautiful. You could have that as a paragraph in your book, Jundo. I like using the garden analogy too. Like unweeding the garden won't stop more weed to appear in the future. Yet, we do clean them off and see the weed as a perfect opportunity to practise cleaning while understanding that we need to weed off too.

    Gassho,
    Sat today,
    Lah,
    Geerish.

    Sent from my PAR-LX1M using Tapatalk

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    I would say that we so radically accept, so thoroughly allow, so fully drop all demands for change, that nothing is lacking, all is complete, there is not a drop to fix and no work to be done whatsoever ...

    ... all while we (from another eye) do not accept what is wrong, do not allow faults or injustice, want change for problems and illness, know that some things are lacking and we need to fill the hole, realize that there is more work to do to get to our target ...

    ALL AT ONCE

    ... as if knowing life two ways at once, as one way out of two eyes, both eyes open at once providing perspective and clarity.

    "Accepting" and "not accepting" are not, as most folks believe, either/or propositions. Instead, Zen practice teaches us that the two seemingly contradictory perspective can be held at one.

    It is something like seeing dust in a filthy house, realizing each grain of dust as a shining jewel, seeing that each grain of dust is in exactly its beautiful spot in the universe with no place to move, realizing that the filthy house is lusciously and glowingly filthy ...

    ... yet grabbing a broom and sweeping up the house because, well, it is filthy and needs to be cleaned.

    (Sorry for running long)

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    I believe I've commented this before, but to me it's like the old red and blue 3D glasses. If you close one eye, the whole world is red (working to change things). If you close another eye, the whole world is blue (wholeness and acceptance). But it's not until both eyes are open that you get context and depth. With both eyes open someone could say "the world is blue" and it would still be true. Another could say "the world is red" and that would also still be true. We can live our lives with one eye closed, but opening both and seeing the reality that both are indeed real and true is a blessing.

    Shinshou (Daniel)
    Sat Today

  11. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Shinshou View Post
    I believe I've commented this before, but to me it's like the old red and blue 3D glasses. If you close one eye, the whole world is red (working to change things). If you close another eye, the whole world is blue (wholeness and acceptance). But it's not until both eyes are open that you get context and depth. With both eyes open someone could say "the world is blue" and it would still be true. Another could say "the world is red" and that would also still be true. We can live our lives with one eye closed, but opening both and seeing the reality that both are indeed real and true is a blessing.

    Shinshou (Daniel)
    Sat Today
    Official notice that I will be stealing this.

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  12. #12
    Shinshou, this is a great example and I'm going to write it down on my journal, to remember. I have been thinking about acceptance a lot lately (lots of stress at work) and I struggle to put it into action. Any suggestions?

    Gassho,
    Mags
    ST

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    Official notice that I will be stealing this.

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    Duly noted!

    Shinshou (Daniel)
    Sat Today
    Last edited by Shinshou; 02-24-2021 at 08:38 PM.

  14. #14
    Member
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    Jan 2021
    Location
    Johannesburg, South Africa
    I experienced this radical acceptance today myself. It arose within me like a flash of insight. Iíve been quite miserable with my job situation as being a school educator during the Covid era has been quite taxing, and along with family members experiencing health issues, the socio-political issues in SA... itís been a bit of a rough time, and Iíve been feeling an intense inner resistance. I became acutely aware of that inner resistance today in a flash and felt all the tension and anger and upset melt away and I smiled as I felt a deep sense of inner peace arise. Iím not here on Treeleaf nearly as much as I should be but I am very dedicated to Shikantaza and it has produced amazing results for me in the short time that Iíve been practicing it since becoming a member of this Sangha.

    Thank you Jundo and all the Treeleaf Sangha 🙏🏻

    Gassho ✨💫
    Clinton

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Shinshou View Post
    I believe I've commented this before, but to me it's like the old red and blue 3D glasses. If you close one eye, the whole world is red (working to change things). If you close another eye, the whole world is blue (wholeness and acceptance). But it's not until both eyes are open that you get context and depth. With both eyes open someone could say "the world is blue" and it would still be true. Another could say "the world is red" and that would also still be true. We can live our lives with one eye closed, but opening both and seeing the reality that both are indeed real and true is a blessing.

    Shinshou (Daniel)
    Sat Today
    I think this accurately reflects what I've been thinking about. I've been going with the red lense for quite a bit. How does one do the - insert activity- is really what is missing for me I think.

    Gassho
    St
    Kaisho (Seachel | Chelsea)

    Sent from my SM-A205U using Tapatalk

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Doshin View Post
    You just described why I avoided the path for many years. It was my misunderstanding of just this.

    Doshin
    St
    That resonates with me Doshin - and I still fall into a resistance/misunderstanding from time to time. I think our minds are so wired to a binary opposites way of operating - (this thing is bad, or good, or nice, or horrid,etc ) that its difficult to adopt a spacious response that encompasses 'nothing to change/ action needed'. I think its hard to express that spaciousness in words and it can only really be experienced/understood by sitting.

    Gassho

    Jinyo

    ST
    Last edited by Jinyo; 02-23-2021 at 10:39 PM.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by T@r0 View Post
    I experienced this radical acceptance today myself. It arose within me like a flash of insight. I’ve been quite miserable with my job situation as being a school educator during the Covid era has been quite taxing, and along with family members experiencing health issues, the socio-political issues in SA... it’s been a bit of a rough time, and I’ve been feeling an intense inner resistance. I became acutely aware of that inner resistance today in a flash and felt all the tension and anger and upset melt away and I smiled as I felt a deep sense of inner peace arise.
    Yes, problem is still there, and yes, on some level we still don't like it at all ... and yet, the world is seen in new light, and it is just not the same problem as before ...

    Gassho, J

    STlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Kaisho View Post
    ... when you think things shouldn't be in a certain way a light should go on that tells you to stop and practice ...
    I have a snarky quote from Sawaki Roshi* tucked away that I always remind myself of when I fall into that trap of thinking "it shouldn't be like this!" or "this isn't right!":

    There is no reason to expect the reality of immeasurable and unbounded life to satisfy your puny little thoughts
    But, once you've accepted that the universe is not designed to fulfill your expectations, as Jundo notes, you can clear away that unhelpful mental clog and get to work fixing it! (Not that I'm skilled at doing so...)

    -satToday

    *I find myself going back to Sawaki's writings more than anyone the longer I've been practicing. He has a way of cutting through so much hogwash in making his points
    Thanks,
    Kaishin (Open Heart aka Matt)
    Please take this layman's words with a grain of salt.

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Kaishin View Post
    There is no reason to expect the reality of immeasurable and unbounded life to satisfy your puny little thoughts
    But, once you've accepted that the universe is not designed to fulfill your expectations, as Jundo notes, you can clear away that unhelpful mental clog and get to work fixing it! (Not that I'm skilled at doing so...)
    Ah, but if ya can't beat em, join em!

    If the universe as it is does not please one's personal likes, one can change one's personal likes to be pleased by the universe as it is!

    Oh, I don't mean that we need to like the ugly parts, such as war, sickness, cruelty and such. That is not my meaning at all.

    But we can see through the world's ugly to the grand balance and harmony of the entire dance, beyond small earthly war and peace, sickness vs. health, beautiful and ugly. There is this which sweeps it all in as just acts of the grand show.

    And here on earth, we can do what we can to end the war, cure the disease, replacing the ugly with something beautiful.

    Gassho, J

    STLah

    I am reminded of this song ...

    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

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