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Thread: ARTS: Folk Music

  1. #1

    ARTS: Folk Music

    This thread is for any posts on Folk Music. Your music, discussions questions, everything.

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    Last edited by Jundo; 02-15-2021 at 01:44 AM.
    清 Sei (Pure)
    光 Ko (Light)

    Al Garrod, Lincoln, UK.

    Chanting & Zazen Circle.
    All welcome.
    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...g-Zazen-Circle

  2. #2
    Well, this thread is off to rather a slow start. Would you like me to post some examples of music, to find out what you all like?

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    清 Sei (Pure)
    光 Ko (Light)

    Al Garrod, Lincoln, UK.

    Chanting & Zazen Circle.
    All welcome.
    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...g-Zazen-Circle

  3. #3
    I like the old Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie songs.

    Talking Union

    Gassho,
    Jim
    stlah

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Seiko View Post
    Well, this thread is off to rather a slow start. Would you like me to post some examples of music, to find out what you all like?

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    Yes please I'm not familiar with folk music; at least I don't think I am

    Gassho

    Risho
    -stlah

  5. #5
    Hi Seiko!

    I am a big fan of traditional/folk music and play an Irish style flat-backed mandolin made by Ashbury from cedar wood. Mostly I like northern European folk traditions including British/Irish, Breton and Scandinavian music.

    However, for some time I have been learning this Bulgarian dance tune called Mominsko Horo which skips through timings such as 14/8, 13/8, 9/8 and 16/8!



    As for listening, musicians and bands I enjoy include Capercaillie (Scotland), Robin Williamson (Scotland), Catherine-Ann MacPhee (Scotland/Gaelic), Julie Fowlis (Scotland/Gaelic), John Renbourn (England), Martin Carthy (England), Alan Stivell (France/Breton), Jim Moray (England), Planxty (Ireland), Matt Molloy (Ireland), The Bothy Band (Ireland), Myrkur (Denmark), Garmarna (Sweden), Agnes Buen Garnås (Norway), Fairport Convention (England), The Unthanks (NE England).

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  6. #6
    Btw, can anyone remember who was the member we had from The Netherlands who was in a folk band?

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by Kokuu View Post
    Hi Seiko!

    I am a big fan of traditional/folk music and play an Irish style flat-backed mandolin made by Ashbury from cedar wood. Mostly I like northern European folk traditions including British/Irish, Breton and Scandinavian music.

    However, for some time I have been learning this Bulgarian dance tune called Mominsko Horo which skips through timings such as 14/8, 13/8, 9/8 and 16/8!



    As for listening, musicians and bands I enjoy include Capercaillie (Scotland), Robin Williamson (Scotland), Catherine-Ann MacPhee (Scotland/Gaelic), Julie Fowlis (Scotland/Gaelic), John Renbourn (England), Martin Carthy (England), Alan Stivell (France/Breton), Jim Moray (England), Planxty (Ireland), Matt Molloy (Ireland), The Bothy Band (Ireland), Myrkur (Denmark), Garmarna (Sweden), Agnes Buen Garnås (Norway), Fairport Convention (England), The Unthanks (NE England).

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    Ah Kokuu, we have some similar tastes.

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    清 Sei (Pure)
    光 Ko (Light)

    Al Garrod, Lincoln, UK.

    Chanting & Zazen Circle.
    All welcome.
    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...g-Zazen-Circle

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by JimInBC View Post
    I like the old Pete Seeger and Woody Guthrie songs.

    Talking Union

    Gassho,
    Jim
    stlah
    Well Jim,

    When I was growing up (I am English) I "cut my teeth" on The Chieftains.

    There was such a vibrant English, Celtic and European folk scene that we only really heard American singers by accident.


    Most of the English, Irish and Scotish music and song was originally not written down, so many versions of the same tune or song emerged, as musicians changed or misrepeated what they had learned from others.

    I am more familiar with Pete and Peggy Seeger than I am with Woody Guthrie. What would you say are your favourite songs by Pete Seeger and by Woody Guthrie?

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    清 Sei (Pure)
    光 Ko (Light)

    Al Garrod, Lincoln, UK.

    Chanting & Zazen Circle.
    All welcome.
    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...g-Zazen-Circle

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Seiko View Post
    Well Jim,

    When I was growing up (I am English) I "cut my teeth" on The Chieftains.

    There was such a vibrant English, Celtic and European folk scene that we only really heard American singers by accident.


    Most of the English, Irish and Scotish music and song was originally not written down, so many versions of the same tune or song emerged, as musicians changed or misrepeated what they had learned from others.

    I am more familiar with Pete and Peggy Seeger than I am with Woody Guthrie. What would you say are your favourite songs by Pete Seeger and by Woody Guthrie?

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    Hello Seiko,

    Let's see... Some favorite Pete Seeger songs:
    Talking Union
    If I Had a Hammer
    Turn Turn Turn
    Waist Deep in the Big Muddy
    Little Boxes

    Some favorite Woody Guthrie songs:
    Dust Bowl Blues
    John Henry
    Blowing Down That Old Country Road
    This Land is Your Land

    And Woody's son Arlo Guthrie did some great songs:
    Coming into Los Angeles
    The Motorcycle Song
    Alice's Restaurant Massacree

    Gassho,
    Jim
    stlah

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Kokuu View Post
    Btw, can anyone remember who was the member we had from The Netherlands who was in a folk band?

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    Oh, that's Ongen. He still is around from time to time. Here he is with the squeeze box ...



    We also have Byrne, who does great stuff ...



    And I must mention, Seiryu, who is master of the Puerto Rican Quatro (which he is holding) ...



    We have others too.

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  11. #11
    Love me some Arlo. Alice's Restaurant Massacre is a great song.

    Gassho, John
    ST/LAH

  12. #12
    Grateful Dead has some pretty great folk music. Ripple, Friend of the Devil and Uncle John's Band comes to mind immediately as great folk songs. Pretty much anything from the American Beauty and Workingman's Dead albums are great folk tunes. I'm partial though, being a Deadhead myself. Sorry for going over the limit.

    Gassho, John
    ST/LAH

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by GrasshopperMan17 View Post
    Grateful Dead has some pretty great folk music. Ripple, Friend of the Devil and Uncle John's Band comes to mind immediately as great folk songs. Pretty much anything from the American Beauty and Workingman's Dead albums are great folk tunes. I'm partial though, being a Deadhead myself. Sorry for going over the limit.
    As a Deadhead for more than 40 years, I welcome any mention of the band, but I'd not call songs they wrote folk music, in the strict definition of that term. Here's a list of a number of "folk" songs the Dead covered;

    https://folkways.si.edu/roots-of-the...st/smithsonian

    I remember watching the film of Grapes of Wrath back when I was a teenager, and I was stunned to see Henry Fonda playing and singing Going Down the Road Feeling Bad. I hadn't realized it was that old.

    Gassho,

    Ryūmon

    sat
    -----

    流文

    I know nothing.

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by GrasshopperMan17 View Post
    Grateful Dead has some pretty great folk music. Ripple, Friend of the Devil and Uncle John's Band comes to mind immediately as great folk songs. Pretty much anything from the American Beauty and Workingman's Dead albums are great folk tunes. I'm partial though, being a Deadhead myself. Sorry for going over the limit.

    Gassho, John
    ST/LAH
    Hello John,
    Well, everyone's idea of what folk music is, is very different. When I hear the words "folk music", I think of 17th, 18th and 19th century labourers singing to each other - songs they learned by listening to their parents or friends - and music played for dancing on their rare days off work. Stage performance of folk music only really began in the 1960s "folk revival".

    I guess we all think differently. That's not a bad thing.

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    清 Sei (Pure)
    光 Ko (Light)

    Al Garrod, Lincoln, UK.

    Chanting & Zazen Circle.
    All welcome.
    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...g-Zazen-Circle

  15. #15
    I don't pretend to be a great singer, but if anyone wants to hear my songs, you are very welcome to follow me in Instagram. My name there is Branston.Music

    Please concentrate on the stories, though, not the singer.

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    清 Sei (Pure)
    光 Ko (Light)

    Al Garrod, Lincoln, UK.

    Chanting & Zazen Circle.
    All welcome.
    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...g-Zazen-Circle

  16. #16
    I suppose for music from Americans, the closest thing to the sort of English folk song that we know here in UK, is probably the old Appalachian songs or the genre we now call American Roots. For example, the Stanley brothers. I think Ralph and Carter Stanley began performing around 1946.

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    Last edited by Seiko; 02-07-2021 at 03:36 PM.
    清 Sei (Pure)
    光 Ko (Light)

    Al Garrod, Lincoln, UK.

    Chanting & Zazen Circle.
    All welcome.
    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...g-Zazen-Circle

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by Risho View Post
    Yes please I'm not familiar with folk music; at least I don't think I am

    Gassho

    Risho
    -stlah

    Hi Risho,

    YouTube is a good place to start. Here are 5 of my favourites:
    The Dubliners
    The Chieftains
    The Watersons
    Barry Dransfield
    Kathryn Tickell.

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    清 Sei (Pure)
    光 Ko (Light)

    Al Garrod, Lincoln, UK.

    Chanting & Zazen Circle.
    All welcome.
    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...g-Zazen-Circle

  18. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Seiko View Post
    I suppose for music from Americans, the closest thing to the sort of English folk song that we know here in UK, is probably the old Appalachian songs or the genre we now call American Roots. For example, the Stanley brothers. I think Ralph and Carter Stanley began performing around 1946.

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    Thank you. That's a useful pointer.

    I'm curious - would you consider early African-American blues folk music? In the early 20th century it starts to influence much American commercial music. But my understanding is the roots go back to the mid-1800s. Thanks for your thoughts.

    Gassho,
    Jim
    stlah

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryumon View Post
    As a Deadhead for more than 40 years, I welcome any mention of the band, but I'd not call songs they wrote folk music, in the strict definition of that term. Here's a list of a number of "folk" songs the Dead covered;

    https://folkways.si.edu/roots-of-the...st/smithsonian

    I remember watching the film of Grapes of Wrath back when I was a teenager, and I was stunned to see Henry Fonda playing and singing Going Down the Road Feeling Bad. I hadn't realized it was that old.

    Gassho,

    Ryūmon

    sat
    Thank you for that reminder. Yes, the Grateful Dead covered a bunch of traditional folk songs, and put some staples in the folk revival as well, although i understand that in the strictest sense it can't really be called traditional folk. Still love the Dead and respect their contributions into the genre.

    Respectful Gassho, John
    ST/LAH

  20. #20
    Can'o'worms...

    When Dylan reached New York, and clashed with the hard-core folkies, there were almost wars between the purists and the others. Here's a definition of "folk music" from the Oxford Dictionary:

    music that originates in traditional popular culture or that is written in such a style. Folk music is typically of unknown authorship and is transmitted orally from generation to generation.


    That's how the Greenwich Village folkies thought of it, and any attempt to make "folk" music that didn't fit with that idea was considered anathema.

    Since then, we've broadened the definition to include things like the Delta blues, which were written for non-commercial performance, at first, until the "race records" purveyors saw that there was a market for radio.

    As Wikipedia points out:

    The terms folk music, folk song, and folk dance are comparatively recent expressions. They are extensions of the term folklore, which was coined in 1846 by the English antiquarian William Thoms to describe "the traditions, customs, and superstitions of the uncultured classes"

    While people in the UK tend to think of folk music as what Seiko said above, in the US it's a bit different. And in the 1950s, with the genrefication of music, and the rise of the LP, folk music became a label to put on anything from true performers of anonymous, tradition music, and groups like Peter, Paul, and Mary, who were put together by a record producer to perform "folk" tunes for the masses.

    Stage performance of folk music only really began in the 1960s "folk revival".
    In the UK, perhaps, but in the US, it was much earlier. You could probably go back to the 19th century to find folk music performances in vaudeville shows and other venues, and I'd bet that in the UK (about which I know less music history) it was probably similar. If anything, the "folk revival" was the monetization of folk music, and the attempt to create contemporary folk music, in the style of what was olde and anonymouse.

    Gassho,

    Ryūmon

    sat
    -----

    流文

    I know nothing.

  21. #21
    Oh, and to bring us back to zen, one could argue that honkyoku, the oldest, solo works for shakuhachi, is folk music. I don't know enough about Japanese music to know about other kinds, but I'm sure that there is plenty. However, I would think that court music - gagaku - was not folk music.

    Gassho,

    Ryūmon

    sat
    -----

    流文

    I know nothing.

  22. #22
    We all have our own ideas of what we think the folk genre includes. It is interesting to hear so many points of view. Certainly my understanding is that for music to be considered as 'folk' it must be passed from musician to musician orally, without being written down. If you prefer a subdivision, my interests lie in *Traditional* folk, where others may prefer *Contemporary* folk. It is definitely a minefield, but good music is good music, however you classify it.

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    清 Sei (Pure)
    光 Ko (Light)

    Al Garrod, Lincoln, UK.

    Chanting & Zazen Circle.
    All welcome.
    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...g-Zazen-Circle

  23. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by JimInBC View Post
    Thank you. That's a useful pointer.

    I'm curious - would you consider early African-American blues folk music? In the early 20th century it starts to influence much American commercial music. But my understanding is the roots go back to the mid-1800s. Thanks for your thoughts.

    Gassho,
    Jim
    stlah

    Hello Jim,
    My preferred definition is here https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...6-Introduction.
    But it is by no means the only one!

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    清 Sei (Pure)
    光 Ko (Light)

    Al Garrod, Lincoln, UK.

    Chanting & Zazen Circle.
    All welcome.
    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...g-Zazen-Circle

  24. #24
    I am eager to learn more about folk music. I am a beginning (very) mandolin player and hope to explore Irish and other folk music. Is Pentangle considered folk music (folk revival?)?
    Gassho,
    (Naiko) Krista
    st

  25. #25
    Funny, I was just reading a book about Bob Dylan in London, and I came across this, talking about folk music in the 1950s:

    "Factions had started to appear, each holding strong opinions – not just about which songs were legitimate to sing, but the way in which they should be sung. Some decreed that all folk songs should be sung unaccompanied, frowning upon the use of musical instruments. Others considered that only songs from the British Isles were acceptable. The policy at the influential Singers’ Club, started by Ewan MacColl as the Ballad and Blues Club in 1953, was that songs should be from the singer’s own heritage or region of birth."


    Gassho,

    Ryūmon

    sat
    -----

    流文

    I know nothing.

  26. #26
    Is Pentangle considered folk music (folk revival?)?
    Hi Naiko

    Pentangle were definitely part of the 60s/70s folk revival which included Fairport Convention, Martin Carthy and Steeleye Span among others. Although primarily folk, they also took influences from jazz and rock, but many of their songs, such as Sovay and Willy O'Winsbury are traditional folk pieces.

    Two members of the band, John Renbourn and Bert Jansch, were incredible guitarists, both of folk and other genres.

    As regards folk tunes for the mandolin, I really like these two resources and you can often find the tunes on You Tube to play along with or at least listen to:

    Mandolin Tablature Library at the Mandolin Café
    Mandolin Tab

    The Irish reel The Star of Munster is a fun one to play! http://www.mandolintab.net/tabs.php?...nster&id=02255



    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  27. #27
    Morrison's is a nice jig, too, and a little easier than The Star of Munster: https://www.mandolincafe.com/tab/morrisons.txt



    Btw, I am sure you know but for other folk, a jig is in 2/2 or 4/4 time. a reel is in 6/8. Basically, count the notes each time you tap your feet and if you are counting in threes, it is probably a reel, in fours it is a jig.

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    Last edited by Kokuu; 02-08-2021 at 01:56 PM.
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryumon View Post
    Funny, I was just reading a book about Bob Dylan in London, and I came across this, talking about folk music in the 1950s:

    "Factions had started to appear, each holding strong opinions – not just about which songs were legitimate to sing, but the way in which they should be sung. Some decreed that all folk songs should be sung unaccompanied, frowning upon the use of musical instruments. Others considered that only songs from the British Isles were acceptable. The policy at the influential Singers’ Club, started by Ewan MacColl as the Ballad and Blues Club in 1953, was that songs should be from the singer’s own heritage or region of birth."


    Gassho,

    Ryūmon

    sat
    Hi Ryumon,
    If you use Instagram, take a look at my poor offerings. You'll see I am a traditionalist. But there's room for us all.

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    清 Sei (Pure)
    光 Ko (Light)

    Al Garrod, Lincoln, UK.

    Chanting & Zazen Circle.
    All welcome.
    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...g-Zazen-Circle

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Kokuu View Post
    Hi Naiko

    Pentangle were definitely part of the 60s/70s folk revival which included Fairport Convention, Martin Carthy and Steeleye Span among others. Although primarily folk, they also took influences from jazz and rock, but many of their songs, such as Sovay and Willy O'Winsbury are traditional folk pieces.

    Two members of the band, John Renbourn and Bert Jansch, were incredible guitarists, both of folk and other genres.

    As regards folk tunes for the mandolin, I really like these two resources and you can often find the tunes on You Tube to play along with or at least listen to:

    Mandolin Tablature Library at the Mandolin Café
    Mandolin Tab

    The Irish reel The Star of Munster is a fun one to play! http://www.mandolintab.net/tabs.php?...nster&id=02255



    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    Thank you for the resources, Kokuu! That reel is lovely, and well beyond my current capabilities. Goals! I love this version of Pentagle’s Cruel Sister on the octave mandolin. (I do love a good murder song. It seems that tradition hopped the pond and is popular in Appalachian folk songs too.)

    Gassho,
    Naiko
    st

  30. #30
    Hi Naiko!

    The Star of Munster was one of the tunes I started playing mandolin with and it is not as hard as it looks.

    Love that mandola version of Cruel Sister! The extra octave makes for much softer accompaniment. I used to have a bouzouki which is the next octave down. Can you play it okay on the mandolin?

    Murder songs are popular in folk, aren't they? I remember watching a film about Appalachian folk traditions (Songcatcher released in 2000) and recognised a few tunes that had come from England/Ireland/Scotland and given a bluegrass makeover!

    Jim Moray did a modern version of the Cruel Sister/Two (Twa) Sisters a while back on his first album...



    Loreena McKennit also has a version of the same story/song called The Bonny Swans and it appears there are many more (also here and here)!

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    Last edited by Kokuu; 02-08-2021 at 05:38 PM.
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  31. #31
    To relate back to Zen (somewhat!). What does everyone know about Japanese folk songs and traditions? I have found music for a few tunes with names like sakura (cherry blossom) but they are unfamiliar to me.

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  32. #32
    Hello,
    before practicing Shakuhachi with Honkyoku ('original pieces', once played by Komuso 'Zen monks'),
    I practiced some simple Min'yo (folk songs) and children melodies as first steps. My teacher had Koto recordings as backing.
    Sadly, I don't know much about that genre.
    Sakura, very popular in Japan, was among them. Also Kojo no Tsuki (The Moon over the Ruined Castle), Oedo-Nihonbashi (O-Edo Bridge) and such ;-).

    Gassho,
    Kotei sat/lah today.


    Quote Originally Posted by Kokuu View Post
    To relate back to Zen (somewhat!). What does everyone know about Japanese folk songs and traditions? I have found music for a few tunes with names like sakura (cherry blossom) but they are unfamiliar to me.

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    Last edited by Kotei; 02-08-2021 at 07:25 PM.

    義道 冴庭 / Gidou Kotei.
    Being a novice priest doesn't mean that my writing about the Dharma is more substantial than yours. Actually, it might well be the other way round.

  33. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Kotei View Post
    Hello,
    before practicing Shakuhachi with Honkyoku ('original pieces', once played by Komuso 'Zen monks'),
    I practiced some simple Min'yo (folk songs) and children melodies as first steps. My teacher had Koto recordings as backing while practicing.
    Sadly, I don't know much about that genre.
    Sakura, very popular in Japan, was among them. Also Kojo no Tsuki (The Moon over the Ruined Castle), Oedo-Nihonbashi (O-Edo Bridge) and such ;-).

    Gassho,
    Kotei sat/lah today.
    Hello Kotei,
    It sounds beautiful, and perhaps something that I might like to try (I play many blown instruments).
    Can we hear you play please?

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    清 Sei (Pure)
    光 Ko (Light)

    Al Garrod, Lincoln, UK.

    Chanting & Zazen Circle.
    All welcome.
    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...g-Zazen-Circle

  34. #34
    Quote Originally Posted by Seiko View Post
    Hello Kotei,
    It sounds beautiful, and perhaps something that I might like to try (I play many blown instruments).
    Can we hear you play please?
    Trying to remember and stumbling along wouldn't be a pleasure to listen to

    but here is a version of Kojo no Tsuki played by Goro Yamaguchi:


    and here a westernized version of it, played by Thelonious Monk:


    Gassho,
    Kotei sat/lah today.

    義道 冴庭 / Gidou Kotei.
    Being a novice priest doesn't mean that my writing about the Dharma is more substantial than yours. Actually, it might well be the other way round.

  35. #35
    I had a go at Scarborough Fair



    Gassho,
    Gareth

    Sat today
    Last edited by bad_buddha_007; 02-15-2021 at 12:03 AM.

  36. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by bad_buddha_007 View Post
    I had a go at Scarborough Fair



    Gassho,
    Gareth

    Sat today
    this was wonderful. I really love the vibrato. very well done. I'd love to hear more from you.

    Gassho
    krissy
    sat
    Thank you for teaching me.

    I am very much a beginner and appreciate any words you may give me.

  37. #37
    Quote Originally Posted by krissydear View Post
    this was wonderful. I really love the vibrato. very well done. I'd love to hear more from you.

    Gassho
    krissy
    sat
    Thank you very much! I really like the song.

    Gassho,
    Gareth

    Sat today

  38. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Kokuu View Post
    Hi Seiko!

    I am a big fan of traditional/folk music and play an Irish style flat-backed mandolin made by Ashbury from cedar wood. Mostly I like northern European folk traditions including British/Irish, Breton and Scandinavian music.

    However, for some time I have been learning this Bulgarian dance tune called Mominsko Horo which skips through timings such as 14/8, 13/8, 9/8 and 16/8!



    As for listening, musicians and bands I enjoy include Capercaillie (Scotland), Robin Williamson (Scotland), Catherine-Ann MacPhee (Scotland/Gaelic), Julie Fowlis (Scotland/Gaelic), John Renbourn (England), Martin Carthy (England), Alan Stivell (France/Breton), Jim Moray (England), Planxty (Ireland), Matt Molloy (Ireland), The Bothy Band (Ireland), Myrkur (Denmark), Garmarna (Sweden), Agnes Buen Garnås (Norway), Fairport Convention (England), The Unthanks (NE England).

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    Wow, Kokuu, that's great, and those meter changes are wonderful. I play mandolin as well (American A style), but mostly straightforward bluegrass. I'd love to give this tune a shot, thanks for posting.

    Shinshou (Daniel)
    Sat Today

  39. #39
    Here's a nice song. Shame about the poor quality of the singer (me). https://www.instagram.com/tv/CLtZR9i...=1fcv8qglxn91n

    In Gassho
    Seiko
    stlah
    清 Sei (Pure)
    光 Ko (Light)

    Al Garrod, Lincoln, UK.

    Chanting & Zazen Circle.
    All welcome.
    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...g-Zazen-Circle

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