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Thread: Rage-o-Meter 1 Zen Buddhism Practice 0

  1. #1
    Member Onka's Avatar
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    Rural Queensland, Australia

    Rage-o-Meter 1 Zen Buddhism Practice 0

    My body is in overall pretty ordinary shape at the moment but I'm particularly enjoying swollen feet and legs that are so swollen and hurting that I'm ever so tempted to take a razor to them to ease the pressure.
    Of course I won't because although I'm an idiot I'm not so silly to think that this will result in anything other than another trip to hospital and risk of another recovery complication.
    So there I was, shuffling along with The Game Changer, my new mobility walker that is tall enough for me to walk with as straight spine. I was following a horse track towards the front paddocks of our place when I came across what I saw as complete disrespect for myself, my partner and the environment.
    We lost literally everything including vehicles when 3 metres of water went through our place in the 2011 floods. It completely devastated the environment and literally all biodiversity for 7 years. Since then we have worked hard to provide green corridors of native grasses and weeds while maintaining important fire breaks. We prefer to work WITH nature than against it.
    Long winded bollocks later myself and The Game Changer made it to the front paddock where I was faced with what I perceived as utter carnage.
    I was exhausted so sat for around 15 minutes on The Game Changer both crying and raging at the same time. I genuinely exhausted so could do nothing but call my partner by phone and alternate between tears and rage.
    Our neighbour had taken liberties while I've been out of action for 2 months and had completely cleared almost exactly half of our front paddock. A paddock that homed a family of Wallabies, a shedload of bird species, native bees, butterflies, native hares, introduced rabbits and more than I'll ever know amount of skinks and other reptiles as well as frogs of many different species.
    My rage-o-meter was particularly active as I have lost count of how many times in how many ways I had explained to this bloke that he was NEVER to slash our paddocks and if we did actually need help I would do a thorough walk around with him guiding him as to where and what was to be left untouched. I stressed in no uncertain terms the reasons as to why we do what we do in OUR paddocks.
    Anyway rant over. Rage-o-Meter 1 Zen Buddhism 0 and this is the thing that hurts me the most.

    Gassho
    Onka
    ST
    On Ka
    穏 火
    aka Anna Kissed.
    No Gods No Masters.
    Life is too serious to be taken seriously.

  2. #2
    I think one would have to be pretty much dead to not feel some anger in that situation.

    Gassho
    Jakuden
    SatToday/LAH


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    清 道 寂田
    SEIDO JAKUDEN
    I am a novice priest. Any resemblance my posts may have to actual teachings about the Dharma, living or dead, is purely coincidental (and just my attempt to be helpful).

  3. #3
    I am sure he had the best of intentions. It is natural to feel frustration and upset, but don't be too angry if he was foolish. Explain again. Yes, okay to put up a "no tresspassing" sign too. Did he do it for some reason, such as it interferes with his land? Can it grow back?

    I gather that, if he cleared half, you still have half your front paddock. Is the paddock half full or half empty?

    I will sit for all the animals who found a home there.

    For all the folks feeling some frustration at the little "missteps" in fine work or attachment to some object that is impermanent, I usually tell this story ...

    It is about a group of Tibetan monks invited to create a sand mandala at an American museum. After days of precise, careful work ... one grain and one grain for hundreds of thousands of grains ... a passing child, as the mandala neared completion, jumped into it and, kicking his feet, destroyed the fruits of all that effort! The museum staff was aghast!

    But not the monks. What did they do?

    They cleaned the floor, bowed, and began again ... one grain, and one grain, and just one grain ... impermanence ...

    At the end of the show, the monks swept away the Mandala anyway, which was never meant to last.

    I used to think the story was a Buddhist urban legend, until I found this video:



    Gassho, J

    STLah
    Last edited by Jundo; 05-16-2020 at 11:24 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  4. #4
    Member Onka's Avatar
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    Rural Queensland, Australia
    Yes Jakuden I too believe that my reaction was justified but in all honesty I don't want to be captain of the confrontation anymore. These past 2 months have been a tremendous physical and psychological struggle and until this morning I was pretty proud of how I'd managed and dealt with some pretty heavy stuff. My Zen Buddhism Practice came to the fore naturally and words could never encapsulate how valuable these challenges have been in terms of practice. I'm so fricken disappointed with myself but also thankful that I'm still so incredibly unwell that I couldn't bring out Ye Olde Captain Confrontation cap.
    Thank you for your realness Jakuden
    Gassho
    Onka
    St
    On Ka
    穏 火
    aka Anna Kissed.
    No Gods No Masters.
    Life is too serious to be taken seriously.

  5. #5
    Member Onka's Avatar
    Join Date
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    Location
    Rural Queensland, Australia
    I hadn't heard that particular story Jundo but have read of the sand mandala practice and its teaching of impermanence.
    I will sit a LOT with this situation before approaching the neighbour in a few weeks when (a) I hope to have the strength to walk with The Game Changer over to his house, and (b) approach the subject with a less emotionally charged frame of mind that would serve no one well.
    Thank you for your constant teachings Jundo. I don't think you'll ever appreciate how much I value yours and everyone else's presence here at Treeleaf. We're so diverse andd daily teach each other.
    Gassho
    Onka
    St
    On Ka
    穏 火
    aka Anna Kissed.
    No Gods No Masters.
    Life is too serious to be taken seriously.

  6. #6
    I have encountered this as well and i know well the rage you feel. I have spent a lot of time thinking and studying on this topic and although i can find peace and hope now i doubt the hurt can ever be truly erased. I have since channeled it into passion to protect nature. A few things i have found. One is that fortunately life is adaptable and can shift and move with events. Life will regrow and animals move back in. People also have created protected areas which cannot be touched legally. There are also groups which will try to save endangered species. People can learn. Companies will destroy what they feel like if they can get away with it and some habitats and species will never return but there are many stories of success as well. Look for the good. Sometimes a tragedy can be a blessing jn disguise. Perhaps it neans more fertile soil or ecosystem changes where different life can thrive where it couldnt before. Fires and beavers are good examples. It takes a lot to build and little to destroy. Take pleasure in what is present in the present and sow for the future. I am sad to hear yet another story of habitat loss but glad to know i am not alone in this experience. I would like to discuss your progress over time with this as i still need to heal as well.
    Gassho
    David
    Sat/lah

  7. #7
    Member Onka's Avatar
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    Rural Queensland, Australia
    Thank you for your response David. I'm always open to talking about habitat loss, ecological adaption and regeneration with help from folk who do their best to tread lightly.
    Gassho
    Onka
    ST

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