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Thread: Sangha's views on Corona Virus?

  1. #101
    Quote Originally Posted by Myogan View Post
    Just re-read this entire thread, funny how the tone has changed.

    Gassho
    (About to) sit (10 am central)
    How is work?


    Gassho, ST

    Sent from my SM-G988U using Tapatalk

  2. #102

    Sangha's views on Corona Virus?

    Does a virus have Buddha nature?

    Jundo - thank you for your daily you tube dharma talks. They bring much clarity and calm to balance the ceaseless anxiety in the public sphere.

    As an aside, I have found chanting the metta verses while washing my hands is a good for cleansing mind and body. Better than Happy Birthday x2 anyway.

    Gassho

    Bokusei

    saTToday


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Last edited by Bokusei; 03-29-2020 at 04:47 PM.

  3. #103
    Quote Originally Posted by Jishin View Post
    How is work?


    Gassho, ST

    Sent from my SM-G988U using Tapatalk
    Slow. Parents are delaying check ups due to fears, and with school out, normal infections are down.had to put my receptionist on decreased hours. Honestly, I’ve spent more time on social media answering questions and trying to protect against misinformation.

    1500 cases in the state, 85 in the county and we had our first death.

    I joke that boredom, not COVID will be the death of me.

    Gassho, sat
    Marc Connery
    明岩
    Myo̅ Gan - Bright Cliff

    I put the Monkey in Monkeymind

  4. #104
    Myogan

    Thanks for the care you are providing your community.

    Doshin
    St

  5. #105
    Quote Originally Posted by Myogan View Post
    Slow. Parents are delaying check ups due to fears, and with school out, normal infections are down.had to put my receptionist on decreased hours. Honestly, I’ve spent more time on social media answering questions and trying to protect against misinformation.

    1500 cases in the state, 85 in the county and we had our first death.

    I joke that boredom, not COVID will be the death of me.

    Gassho, sat
    So far pretty busy in psychiatry. Most of the folks that can aford care (due to the economy) are coming to appointments. People are anxious.

    Gassho, Jishin, __/stlah\__

  6. #106
    just dropping in to wish everyone well. I hope everyone is safe and healthy

    gassho

    risho
    -st

  7. #107
    Quote Originally Posted by Myogan View Post
    Slow. Parents are delaying check ups due to fears, and with school out, normal infections are down.had to put my receptionist on decreased hours. Honestly, I’ve spent more time on social media answering questions and trying to protect against misinformation.

    1500 cases in the state, 85 in the county and we had our first death.

    I joke that boredom, not COVID will be the death of me.

    Gassho, sat
    Thanks to everyone in medicine, not only these days.

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  8. #108
    Reported 03/31: Even one death is a tragedy, but some good news nonetheless ... yeah, science! From the medical journal "The Lancet".

    Of course, no excuse to lower our guard either! Still high for seniors and those with weakening conditions:

    ==============

    The research, published in the medical journal The Lancet Infectious Diseases, estimated that about 0.66% of those infected with the virus will die.

    That coronavirus death rate, which is lower than earlier estimates, takes into account potentially milder cases that often go undiagnosed -- but it's still far higher than the 0.1% of people who are killed by the flu.

    When undetected infections aren't taken into account, the Lancet study found that the coronavirus death rate was 1.38%, which is more consistent with earlier reports. ...
    ... Researchers combined that data on "infection prevalence" with public information on reported cases and deaths, estimating the overall death rate to be about two-thirds of 1%.
    That number, though, went up in older adults, with approximately 7.8% of those 80 or older estimated to die after infection. And deaths were estimated to be exceedingly rare in children younger than 9, with a fatality rate of just 0.00161%.

    For age groups younger than 40, the death rate was never higher than 0.16%, according to the study. Out of 1,000 young adults infected, then, about 1 or 2 could die, with the youngest people facing the lowest risk.

    "There might be outlying cases that get a lot of media attention, but our analysis very clearly shows that at aged 50 and over, hospitalisation is much more likely than in those under 50, and a greater proportion of cases are likely to be fatal," said Azra Ghani, a professor at Imperial College London and an author of the study, in a statement.

    https://us.cnn.com/2020/03/30/health...ate/index.html
    Gassho, J

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  9. #109
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    Reported 03/31: Even one death is a tragedy, but some good news nonetheless ... yeah, science! From the medical journal "The Lancet".

    Of course, no excuse to lower our guard either! Still high for seniors and those with weakening conditions:

    I say this not to be alarmist but as a fact -- my family (elderly) and I are at risk in those sobering statistics.

    And I am very much aware that we are among many.

    Our healthcare workers *must* receive whatever supplies they need -- without the gov't asking why they are using so much. (Yes, I am serious.)

    gassho
    meian st lh
    Not all who wander are lost. (Tolkien)
    Underestimating a warrior, serves the warrior's advantage.
    迷安 - Mei An - Wandering At Rest

  10. #110
    Hi,

    This article is very informative:

    https://www.thelancet.com/journals/l...243-7/fulltext

    This part is also very important:.

    "Assessing the severity of COVID-19 is crucial to determine the appropriateness of mitigation strategies and to enable planning for health-care needs as epidemics unfold. However, crude case fatality ratios obtained by dividing the number of deaths by the number of cases can be misleading.

    First, there can be a period of 2–3 weeks between a person developing symptoms, the case subsequently being detected and reported, and observation of the final clinical outcome. During a growing epidemic, the final clinical outcome of most of the reported cases is typically unknown. Simply dividing the cumulative reported number of deaths by the cumulative number of reported cases will therefore underestimate the true case fatality ratio early in an epidemic.

    This effect was observed in past epidemics of respiratory pathogens, including severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and H1N1
    influenza, and as such is widely recognised. Thus, many of the estimates of the case fatality ratio that have been obtained to date for COVID-19 correct for this effect.

    Additionally, however, during the exponential growth phase of an epidemic, the observed time lags between the onset of symptoms and outcome (recovery or death) are censored, and naive estimates of the observed times from symptom onset to outcome provide biased estimates of the actual distributions. Ignoring this effect tends to bias the estimated case fatality ratio downwards during the early growth phase of an epidemic.

    Second, surveillance of a newly emerged pathogen is typically biased towards detecting clinically severe cases, especially at the start of an epidemic when diagnostic capacity is low (figure 1). Estimates of the case fatality ratio can thus be biased upwards until the extent of clinically milder disease is determined.

    Data from the epicentre of the outbreak in Wuhan have primarily been obtained through hospital surveillance and, thus, are likely to represent patients with moderate or severe illness, with atypical pneumonia or acute respiratory distress being used to define suspected cases eligible for testing.

    In these individuals, clinical outcomes are likely to be more severe, so any estimates of the case fatality ratio will be higher. Elsewhere in mainland China and the rest of the world, countries and administrative regions alert to the risk of infection being imported via travel initially instituted surveillance for COVID-19 with a broader set of clinical criteria for defining a suspected case. These criteria typically included a combination of symptoms (eg, cough and fever) combined with recent travel history to the affected region (Wuhan, or Hubei province).
    Such surveillance is likely to detect clinically mild cases but, by initially restricting testing to those with a travel history or link, might have missed other symptomatic cases."

    Gassho, Jishin, __/stlah\__

  11. #111
    Like falling blossoms reminding me of impermanence, the virus reminds me that I shouldn't be taking things for granted.

    Gassho, BC

    ST

  12. #112

  13. #113
    Quote Originally Posted by Jishin View Post
    Big cats infected..

    https://news.yahoo.com/tiger-nycs-br...205150772.html

    Gassho, Jishin, __/stlah\__
    I had heard that the great apes are actually the greatest worry, because of the genetic similarity to us ...

    https://www.livescience.com/great-ap...irus-risk.html

    And there has been one apparent case involving a house cat, although scientists think that it was unique and will not be common. A test was conducted in China to show that it is possible for cats to be infected and to transmit to each other, but my understanding is that the dose of virus given to the cats was so artificially high that it proves merely a theoretical possibility of cat to cat transmission, unlikely to occur in ordinary circumstances.

    Prof Eric Fèvre, chair of veterinary infectious diseases at the University of Liverpool, said: “People should take usual precautions of hand washing when handling their pets, and avoid overly intimate contact, especially if sick with Covid. It is important to add that this says nothing about how the virus coming out of a cat may or may not be infectious to humans.”

    Prof Jonathan Ball, a virologist at the University of Nottingham, said similar observations of transmission in cats had been made in relation to Sars, which is genetically closely related to Covid-19. “However, it should be remembered that cats are not playing much, if any, role in the spread of this virus,” he said. “Human to human transmission is clearly the main driver, so there is no need to panic about cats as an important source of virus. Obviously, if you think you have Covid-19 and share a house with a cat, then it would be sensible to limit close interactions with your furry friend until you are better.”
    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...se-study-finds

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    Last edited by Jundo; 04-06-2020 at 12:29 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  14. #114
    Jakuden, any comment?

    A veterinary association said Sunday that a tiger’s positive COVID-19 test reinforced its guidelines that call for people infected with the disease to cut contact with animals.

    The American Veterinary Medical Association said in a statement that until more is known about how the virus affects animals, ill pet owners should have others care for their dogs and cats.

    The group added that there had been no reports of pets or livestock developing the disease in the United States. In other countries, four cats and dogs have tested positive for COVID-19, the association said.
    https://www.nbcnews.com/health/healt...96/ncrd1177296

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  15. #115
    My goodness, I hope this is a rare thing!

    Gassho
    Sat today, lah
    求道芸化 Kyudo Geika
    I am just a priest-in-training, please do not take anything I say as a teaching.

  16. #116
    Pet Planning for Covid-19 NYSVMS 3-30-2020.pdf

    Hopefully, the species that can become infected will not be able to pass the virus on to humans. But we just don't know yet. From a small study done by the WHO, it seems like dogs probably can't. Domestic cats are more closely related to us, and may become infected, but no evidence to date that they either get sick from Covid 19 or can transmit it. Ferrets (whom we share most influenza viruses freely back and forth with) have not been studied at all to my knowledge. For now, the advice is that if you are sick, limit your interactions with pets the same way you would with humans.

    Gassho,
    Jakuden
    SatToday
    清 道 寂田
    SEIDO JAKUDEN
    I am a novice priest. Any resemblance my posts may have to actual teachings about the Dharma, living or dead, is purely coincidental (and just my attempt to be helpful).

  17. #117
    Hi everyone,
    Pretty scary stuff, all the more if you have an underlying health issue, or if you work in a hospital (like me!). Everything has changed in the last couple of months, but I try to remind myself that nothing has changed - tomorrow was never promised to me. Still, I am washing my hands way more than I used to, out of precaution my wife and I are 'social distancing' as well. I am not one of the docs or nurses who are at much higher risk...still, working in a hospital does bring the matter home. I hope everyone is being safe - social distancing and handwashing - and taking care of yourself as well. I try to remind myself if I'm in a hurry, perhaps I need to slow down. In many ways what this sangha is doing, I think, has been pretty good practice for the situation we all find ourselves in right now. We can do what we are doing as a group in the same literal room, or alone together as well.
    take care.
    gassho,
    sean
    sat.lah

  18. #118
    I don't believe that this will exactly "cheer folks up," but at least it is an honest statistic which shows that things have not changed all that much from before this epidemic began ...

    No, the coronavirus is not the leading cause of death in the US, CDC says

    Even though the coronavirus pandemic continues to take lives across the United States, Covid-19 has not become the leading cause of death in the nation, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention confirmed to CNN.

    ... False claims declaring that coronavirus has become the leading cause of death in the US have swirled as the US leads the world in coronavirus cases. Those claims are made by some experts comparing how many people die of coronavirus daily with the estimate of how many people may die daily on average of each leading cause of death, using CDC data.

    ... "We have limited data on 2020 deaths by cause, and no final official numbers yet for 2019, but we do know by looking at the final death totals in 2018 for the two leading causes of death in the U.S., Heart Disease and Cancer, there is no way that at this point COVID-19 comes anywhere close to those totals," Lancashire said in the email.

    He noted that between January and April in 2018, more than 234,000 people in the United States died of heart disease and nearly 199,000 died of cancer.

    So far during the coronavirus pandemic, there have been about 16,700 Covid-19 deaths in the United States, according to the latest data from Johns Hopkins University.

    https://us.cnn.com/2020/04/10/health...rnd/index.html
    Hopefully, the pandemic numbers will be as low as possible. Hopefully, we will continue to find treatments and cures for those other causes.

    Of course, even one loss of a loved one whatever the cause is someone's life.

    But, hopefully, we Zen folks will continue to see the light which shines through all sickness and health, life and death too!

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  19. #119
    Here is a more technical explanation of where we are at regarding the Coronavirus among species, for those who are interested and like to wade through medical jargon.


    Coronaviruses in the domestic animal kingdom
    What the zoonotic origin of SARS-CoV-2 implies for pets and livestock


    April 3, 2020 (published)
    By Natalie Slivinski


    The coronaviruses that cause the potent respiratory diseases SARS, MERS and COVID-19 have an important feature in common: They are zoonotic, meaning they first came from animals. What does that mean for people and their pets?

    Since February, four household pets have tested positive for SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus sweeping the globe: two dogs in Hong Kong, a Pomeranian and a German shepherd; a cat in Belgium; and, most recently, a cat in Hong Kong. All the animals' owners had COVID-19. Although they apparently picked up viral particles shed by their human companions, none of the Hong Kong pets showed signs of illness consistent with COVID-19. The Belgian cat, however, did become sick, showing signs about a week after its owner became ill.

    The occurrences raise questions about whether pets could become part of the COVID-19 transmission chain. Veterinarians and other health experts say there is no cause for owners to abandon their animals for fear of catching the disease — if anything, it's the pets who should be kicking us out. There is no evidence that pets can transmit the virus back to people. "I think it's far more likely that they'll get it from the person that's shedding large amounts of virus, rather than the other way around," said Dr. Melissa Kennedy, a virologist at the University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine.

    Medical experts say the real threat lies in human-to-human transmission. While some pet species may be able to pick up infections, that doesn't mean they play a role in spreading the virus. Still, research is ongoing, and owners should include their pets when practicing COVID-19 precautions.

    In his blog Worms & Germs, Dr. J. Scott Weese, a pathobiologist and internal medicine specialist at the University of Guelph's Ontario Veterinary College, advises: "If you're sick, stay away from animals just like you would other people. If you have COVID-19 and have been around your pets, keep your pets inside and away from other people. While the risk of transmission to or from a pet is low, we don't want an exposed pet tracking this virus out of the household (just like we don't want an infected person doing that)."

    Meet the coronavirus family

    Coronaviruses are diverse. They have adapted to occupy a slew of animal species, including birds, cats, dogs, pigs, mice, horses, whales, monkeys, ferrets, camels and cows. There are hundreds of known coronaviruses, which fall into four genetically different genera, or subgroups: alpha and beta, which mainly infect mammals; and gamma and delta, which mainly infect birds. Often, they don't make their host sick, and most cannot transmit from one species to another. But occasionally, when a virus evolves a mutation that benefits its ability to thrive, it can jump species, or "spill over." If the mutated virus can replicate to high enough levels, it can cause an outbreak among humans or other animals.

    Seven known coronaviruses infect people. Four of these are endemic — that is, regularly found in a particular region — and usually cause what we call a common cold.

    Three of the seven coronaviruses that afflict humans have evolved within the past two decades and can make some people severely ill. These are SARS-CoV, MERS-CoV and, most recently, SARS-CoV-2.

    All three are thought to have come from bats, whose specially adapted immune systems enable them to carry coronaviruses without becoming sick. The coronavirus that caused severe acute respiratory syndrome in 2002 may have passed directly from bats, but is thought to have been transmitted to humans largely through intermediate animals — likely masked palm civets and raccoon dogs, both common in Chinese live-animal markets. The coronavirus that causes Middle East respiratory syndrome exists comfortably in dromedary camels without causing them obvious signs of illness. To this day, camels occasionally pass the virus to the humans who handle them. Experts suspect that SARS-CoV-2, the cause of COVID-19, also may have made the journey from bats to humans through an unknown intermediate animal, perhaps the pangolin.

    What makes the SARS and MERS viruses special? How can they transmit to humans when other members of their family cannot?

    The answer lies in the name. The coronavirus is named for the crown, or corona, of spikes on its surface, which the virus uses to attach to the outside of host cells and insert its RNA. These spike proteins have binding sites that stick to a specific cell receptor protein on the host cell's surface. Many viruses recognize only receptors that are specific to one animal species.

    Others are generalists. A recent study in the Journal of Virology found that the spikes of both SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2 bind to a host cell receptor called angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, or ACE2. ACE2 is found in many different animals, and if the spike protein can form a strong enough bond with an animal's ACE2, the virus can successfully infect that animal's cells. According to the study authors, the SARS virus evolved mutations in its spike protein to better stick to human ACE2 during the 2002 epidemic.

    The researchers found that SARS-CoV-2 spikes also appear to bind well to ACE2 — and not just in humans but also in other primates, bats, pigs, ferrets and cats. Other studies have suggested that it also recognizes ACE2 in pangolins, civets, raccoon dogs, camels and, possibly, domestic dogs.

    The veterinary and research communities remain vigilant. But although domestic animals such as cats and dogs may be infected, viral transmission in household pets is considered unlikely. Based on current evidence, Kennedy believes that dogs are not "epidemiologically important" for COVID-19. That's because there's more to a successful infection than sticking to host cells. And while humans provide a very comfortable environment for SARS-CoV-2, Kennedy said, dogs apparently do not.

    'Infected' versus 'infectious'

    The dogs that tested positive in Hong Kong were found to have viral RNA in the mouth and nose. When the Hong Kong Agriculture, Fisheries and Conservation Department performed serological tests to measure antibodies against COVID-19 in the blood of the Pomeranian, the final result came back positive, indicating a bona fide infection. However, the dog never showed any clinical signs.

    In fact, you can be infected with a virus without feeling sick. When you feel ill, it's the result of the virus replicating to high enough levels to do two things: first, to destroy large numbers of healthy cells; and second, to trigger inflammation that can cause unpleasant symptoms such as fever and coughing. But if the virus can't replicate efficiently, it can't muster enough copies of itself to pose much of a challenge to the body's immune system, which mounts a coordinated attack and clears out the invader before its host notices symptoms.

    It seems likely, Kennedy said, that dogs are not a hospitable host for SARS-CoV-2. "The host specificity of a virus is determined, basically, by two factors," she explained: "One, that the cells the virus is infecting have a receptor that it can attach to. And then, once the virus is inside the cell, that cell has to be able to provide everything that the virus needs in order to replicate."

    While dogs' cells might have a fitting ACE2 receptor, Kennedy suspects that SARS-CoV-2 isn't happy enough in the canine cellular environment to replicate to high levels. There must also be a large enough dose of virus to breach the frontline defenses of every new host. Without the ability to replicate efficiently, the virus has nowhere to go.

    Vaccinating against coronavirus

    Alphacoronaviruses Host
    Canine enteric coronavirus (CCoV) Dog
    Feline coronavirus (FCoV) Cat
    Porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus (TGEV) Pig
    Porcine epidemic diarrhea virus (PEDV) Pig
    Ferret enteric coronavirus (FRECV) Ferret
    Ferret systemic coronavirus (FRSCV) Ferret
    Mink coronavirus (MCoV) Mink
    Betacoronaviruses
    Bovine coronavirus (BCoV) Cow
    Canine respiratory coronavirus (CRCoV) Dog
    Equine coronavirus (ECoV) Horse
    Porcine hemagglutinating encephalomyelitis virus (PHEV) Pig
    Deltacoronaviruses
    Porcine deltacoronavirus (PDCoV) Pig
    The table shows selected pathogenic coronaviruses in domestic animals. Vaccines exist for a few, including canine enteric coronavirus, feline coronavirus, porcine transmissible gastroenteritis virus, and bovine coronavirus. More are in production. However, none protects against SARS-CoV-2.

    Existing vaccines for coronaviruses are thought to boost the animal's immunity, at least partly, to the viral spike proteins. Spikes are genetically and structurally different among coronavirus genera. Therefore, antibodies produced in response to a vaccine for one genus of coronavirus won't recognize spikes from a different genus of coronavirus.

    It's not only the spikes that differ. Bovine coronavirus is a beta coronavirus, for which there is a vaccine. BCoV and the SARS viruses are in the same genus. But SARS-CoV, the virus that causes SARS, and SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, belong to yet another genetically different subgenus — a subgroup within a subgroup. BCoV is a group 2a beta coronavirus, while SARS viruses are group 2b beta coronaviruses. The subgenera are genetically different enough that they stimulate the production of completely different antibodies that don't cross-react.

    Even existing coronavirus vaccines are not especially effective, and in some cases have caused adverse reactions. Some have been reported to cause their target coronaviruses – which are unusually genetically adaptable – to mutate into a new pathogenic strain. This is why experts recommend practical measures as a first-line defense against coronavirus transmission. That means adequate surveillance, rapid diagnostic testing and swift quarantines, if necessary.

    In humans, there's no doubt: Our bodies are like a five-star hotel for SARS-CoV-2. We can transmit the disease even without symptoms, perhaps because our cells are quite permissive to the virus. This effect is amplified in cities, where the high density of people means that a large population is being exposed to particularly high levels of virus.

    As for dogs, Kennedy believes they are likely a dead end for SARS-CoV-2 — meaning they can catch the virus but they cannot give it back. While human cells are permissive for some reason, canine cells may not be. "From what we know thus far, the dog is not providing everything that virus needs in order to replicate to significant enough levels to make it important in the spread of the virus," she said. "There may not be enough permissive cells. But that's under investigation now."

    The cells of cats and ferrets, however, appear to be more receptive to coronaviruses. Scientists at Harbin Veterinary Research Institute in China, in a study not yet peer reviewed, found that "SARS-CoV-2 replicates poorly in dogs, pigs, chickens and ducks, but efficiently in ferrets and cats. We found that the virus transmits in cats via respiratory droplets."

    The finding on cats and ferrets is consistent with the SARS virus from 2002. For that reason, Weese, who is a zoonotic disease expert at Ontario Veterinary College, anticipated some weeks ago that cats and ferrets might become infected by the virus that causes COVID-19. "With the original SARS virus, cats ... were able to grow enough virus to pass it on to another cat," he said.

    Weese was therefore unsurprised by the news about the Belgian cat, which had both a positive test result and clinical signs. According to an article in The Brussels Times, the cat had diarrhea, vomiting and difficulty breathing. Researchers found virus in the cat's feces, the newspaper reported. The cat in Hong Kong, which has not shown any signs of the disease, also had virus in its rectal samples, as well as in its mouth and nose, according to the government statement.

    Ferrets, too, have been found to have ACE2 receptors and are permissive to a number of viruses that infect humans, including some types of bird flu and seasonal flu, according to Kennedy. Early studies have shown that SARS-CoV-2 replicates well in ferret cells. However, Weese believes their transmission risks are low, at least from an epidemiological standpoint.

    "If you put a cat and a ferret in front of me and ask me which one I want to get in close contact with, I'd pick the cat, because ferrets are high risk at that one-on-one level," he said. "But for me, cats are still a bigger concern because there are a lot more cats than ferrets."

    While the susceptibility of ferrets may be worrisome for ferret owners, it could be a boon for COVID-19 research. According to the New York Times, scientists at the University of Pittsburgh recently found that a ferret in their lab developed a high fever after being exposed to SARS-CoV-2. The strong immune response suggests ferrets likely are vulnerable to illness, which makes them a promising animal model for developing a COVID-19 vaccine.

    Assessing risk

    Despite the ferret finding, experts believe the likelihood of catching COVID-19 from a pet ferret or cat is low. Even if transmission to individual owners is theoretically possible, both Weese and Kennedy believe the risk does not translate to large-scale spread.

    "An infected cat isn't a big concern in the household, since the person who exposed the cat in the first place is the main risk," Weese wrote last week in his blog. "The virus is being transmitted very effectively person to person, so animals likely play little role, if any, in the grand scheme of things."

    Other than the Belgian cat, there are no other reports of domestic animals, including livestock, getting sick with COVID-19. That could change, of course; more animals from households with COVID-19 cases need to be tested to form a clearer picture.

    Furthermore, viruses are apt to mutate, and coronaviruses have unusually large genomes, predisposing them to a large number of mutations. Such genetic "mistakes" are what drive their evolution. "Those mistakes are purely random," Kennedy explained, "but if they give that virus selective advantage over its comrades, then that mutation will be maintained in the virus population."

    If SARS-CoV-2 were to mutate such that the virus became more able to infect and spread, domestic animals could become reservoirs. That would have major implications for a world full of pet and livestock owners. It's also theoretically possible the virus could find a way to spill over from cats or ferrets back into humans. But there's no evidence to date that this is happening.

    A call for common sense

    Weese is working on testing more animals from COVID-19-positive households. "We're trying to do active surveillance of animals that are in contact with infected people," he said.

    If many more positive tests emerge in pets, public-health experts will review the transmission risks. But routinely testing large populations of domestic animals would be impractical and probably not very informative, Weese said: "Testing is useful to use from a research standpoint, but testing your average animal isn't something we want to get done."

    His focus is on practical protective measures. For pig farmers, for example, simply exercising caution may effectively prevent transmission. "If you've got COVID and you've got pigs but you don't go near the barn, then we don't have to worry about it," Weese said. "And with farmers, it's actually probably easier [than with pet owners], because a pig farmer realizes that if someone reports a pig being positive, pork prices are going to plummet."

    For pet owners, it's about managing animals the same way we manage people, Weese said. This means staying separated from pets if you're sick, as painful as it may be to deny yourself snuggle therapy. It also means including pets in social distancing. If you are under local stay-at-home orders and keeping a distance from others, keep your pet distant from others, too. Even if pets can't get COVID-19, viral particles can get on their mouth, nose, fur or skin and be picked up by the next person who touches them. Think of pets as another surface that can be contaminated, like a countertop or door handle. The overall message, Weese said, is simple: "Just use common sense."

    The best defense against transmission by household pets is to keep exposed animals in the home but sometimes this is impossible; for instance, if someone who lives alone needs to be hospitalized. In a blog post Thursday, Weese discusses options for such situations. The best scenario, he writes, is for someone who has recovered from COVID-19 to come into the household to continue caring for the pet. If no one is available, not even a benevolent low-risk neighbor, owners may be able to temporarily house their pet with a shelter or clinic that has the facilities and capacity. Weese's own hospital is positioned to house animals from COVID-19 households. Space is limited, and the option is intended as a last resort. "We're set up to handle those animals," he said, "but our focus is to keep animals in the household or find alternative approaches rather than see them in clinics."

    Corrections: This story has been changed from the original to remove a repetitive passage. The article also has been changed to remove an incorrect statement about coronavirus genetic replication and proofreading enzymes. The latest research suggests some coronaviruses do possess a proofreading enzyme.

    URL: https://www.vin.com/doc/?id=9580718

    Gassho,
    Jakuden
    SatToday
    清 道 寂田
    SEIDO JAKUDEN
    I am a novice priest. Any resemblance my posts may have to actual teachings about the Dharma, living or dead, is purely coincidental (and just my attempt to be helpful).

  20. #120
    Member Onka's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Rural Queensland, Australia
    Hi Jakuden
    Thank you for this. My partner and I prefer to read scholarly articles and science based information in general but at the moment in particular.
    If only calls for so-called "common sense" could be viewed by all and that "common sense" was indeed common.
    Our so-called political leaders across the globe have been found out. Without their politically driven scripts that they fall back on verbatim when called upon for leadership many have been left sucking their thumb while rocking in the corner.
    Thankfully the Medical and Scientific community carry on doing what they do best and we are able to get regular, ongoing, verifiable, often peer reviewed information within a dynamic environment that can be trusted.
    Thank you Jakuden for sharing this with us lay folk. Dissemination of Science based facts is the only way to dispel the fear mongering, agenda driven rubbish that is filling our mainstream information sources.
    It is however interesting to hear that there are calls for the US President's daily Coronavirus press conferences to be scrapped because he can't be trusted to deliver facts and seems more interested in how his ratings are on Facebook and Fox.
    Perhaps the US population, realising the severity of the situation they find themselves in have decided to start bypassing fools and listening to fact.
    Again, thank you for this Jakuden and thank you for the service that you're continuing to provide.
    Gassho
    Onka Anna
    On Ka
    穏 火
    aka Anna Kissed.
    No Gods No Masters.
    Life is too serious to be taken seriously.

  21. #121
    I should be patient about human ignorance and imperfection, I know ... but this is just very sad and dangerous ...

    Despite evidence from infectious disease experts suggesting otherwise, nearly 30% of Americans in a new Pew poll said they believe the novel coronavirus was likely created in a lab.

    The latest poll from the public opinion fact tank shows that misinformation around the virus is still king, even as fact checkers and public health officials work furiously to dispel it and save American lives.
    A total of 23% of adults polled said they believe the virus was created intentionally. This is almost certainly not true, according to the genetic detectives studying the virus's origins.
    And 43% -- a plurality, but not an overwhelming majority -- said the virus likely came about naturally. This is most likely the truth, according to virus experts.

    https://us.cnn.com/2020/04/13/us/cor...rnd/index.html
    The conspiracy linking 5G to coronavirus just will not die

    One of the most recent, baseless conspiracy theories surrounding the virus is that 5G networks -- the next generation of wireless technology that's steadily being rolled out around the world -- are fueling the global coronavirus pandemic. They are not.

    Unfounded claims about a supposed link between 5G and Covid-19 began circulating on the fringes of the internet, where New Agers and QAnon followers perpetuated the hoax that global elites were using 5G to spread the virus.

    Unsophisticated algorithms amplified those voices and ushered unsubstantiated theories into the mainstream.
    Officials in the United Kingdom have expressed concerns that recent attacks on cell phone towers were motivated by false conspiracy theories. Meanwhile, actor Woody Harrelson and singer M.I.A. are among celebrities and influencers spreading such claims to their millions of followers.

    There's no evidence to support the theory that 5G networks cause Covid-19 or contribute to its spread. But still, it refuses to die.
    https://us.cnn.com/2020/04/08/tech/5...rnd/index.html
    Just for the record ...

    The coronavirus did not escape from a lab. Here's how we know

    Kristian Andersen, an associate professor of immunology and microbiology at Scripps Research, and his colleagues looked at the genetic template for the spike proteins that protrude from the surface of the virus. The coronavirus uses these spikes to grab the outer walls of its host's cells and then enter those cells. They specifically looked at the gene sequences responsible for two key features of these spike proteins: the grabber, called the receptor-binding domain, that hooks onto host cells; and the so-called cleavage site that allows the virus to open and enter those cells.

    That analysis showed that the "hook" part of the spike had evolved to target a receptor on the outside of human cells called ACE2, which is involved in blood pressure regulation. It is so effective at attaching to human cells that the researchers said the spike proteins were the result of natural selection and not genetic engineering.
    https://www.livescience.com/coronavi...de-in-lab.html
    5G is not linked to the coronavirus pandemic in any way. Here's the science.

    https://www.livescience.com/5g-coron...-debunked.html
    Gassho, J

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  22. #122
    My wife’s uncle is one of those that believes that the virus was human made ... likely in China. It is pointless arguing with him about it and I have better things to do with my time. My feeling is “so what?” Whether it natural or man made doesn’t change the fact that we are dealing with it right now.

    Just my 2 cents


    Tairin
    Sat today and lah

  23. #123
    Unfortunatly, many people in Brazil (28% of the population according to one poll) don't even believe the SARS-Cov-2 is a real thing. My father-in-law, for exemple , just said to my wife that there is a medical communist conspiracy against Bolsonaro's government and the death certificates are forged by the doctors to undermine our far-right President. It really is difficult to argue against these guys. Last week a group just stopped some ambulances from bringing sick people to the hospital. And now it is a matter of patriotism and fidelity to the government to ignore the lockdown.
    I'm having difficulty reciting metta to these people, but I do it any way.
    Gassho,
    Mateus
    Sat/LAH

  24. #124
    Quote Originally Posted by mateus.baldin View Post
    Unfortunatly, many people in Brazil (28% of the population according to one poll) don't even believe the SARS-Cov-2 is a real thing. My father-in-law, for exemple , just said to my wife that there is a medical communist conspiracy against Bolsonaro's government and the death certificates are forged by the doctors to undermine our far-right President. It really is difficult to argue against these guys. Last week a group just stopped some ambulances from bringing sick people to the hospital. And now it is a matter of patriotism and fidelity to the government to ignore the lockdown.
    I'm having difficulty reciting metta to these people, but I do it any way.
    Gassho,
    Mateus
    Sat/LAH
    Some folks are filled with greed, anger and divided (e.g., us/them, we/not me, right/wrong) thinking ... and some folks are really REALLY REALLY filled with greed, anger and ignorance ...

    ... plus basic ignorance (not to be confused with Buddhist ignorance of divided thinking, although they often overlap) due simply to lack of education, critical reading skills and/or belief in misinformation.

    It has been so since we our ancestors crawled out of the oceans.

    Gassho, J

    ** Right now I am at home finishing the manuscript for my future book "ZEN of the FUTURE!" in which I make the daring prediction that the human race will soon get things right! (Assuming, of course, that we don't just keep getting things so very wrong!)
    Last edited by Jundo; 04-14-2020 at 12:35 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  25. #125
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    ** Right now I am at home finishing the manuscript for my future book "ZEN of the FUTURE!" in which I make the daring prediction that the human race will soon get things right! (Assuming, of course, that we don't just keep getting things so very wrong!)


    Mateus
    Sat/LAH

  26. #126
    When I encounter someone who doesn't believe, I just feel sad that they are so frightened that they must cling to a lie.

    Gassho
    Sat today, lah
    求道芸化 Kyudo Geika
    I am just a priest-in-training, please do not take anything I say as a teaching.

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