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Thread: Bringing back the pollinators

  1. #1

    Bringing back the pollinators

    This is a really fun activity for all ages. I've done it a few times now and it's always a lot of fun and have seen a large influx of bees in my area since all these new wildflowers bloomed. Please only use local wildflower seeds from your area! The other ingredients are clay and soil. It seems every website has different ratios for each and I've done many different ones and they've all turned out fine. (It seems like a 1 part clay to 2 parts soil is usual) You can throw these in areas that are rarely mowed, meadows, clearings, fields, basically any unused place devoid of wildflowers.

    Pollinators need these flowers and we (humans and other sentient beings) need the food produced by pollinators while also helping our pollinator friends who aren't doing well right now. Winter is a good time to make them since the seeds will lie dormant until spring. Please note that throwing these seed balls onto property that isn't yours can be considered trespassing or littering. Please check local laws. FYI, they are commonly called seed bombs because you throw them and they explode into wildflowers. I've opted to just call them seed balls here. Below are some links to get anyone started. Let me know if anyone has any questions!

    https://www.wildlifetrusts.org/actio...make-seed-bomb

    https://www.naturespath.com/en-us/bl...iy-seed-bombs/

  2. #2
    Thanks a lot for sharing this, Tyler!
    This is a very good idea - will definietely try it out!

    Gassho,

    Daitetsu

    #sat2day
    no thing needs to be added

  3. #3
    Member Onka's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2019
    Location
    Rural Queensland, Australia
    I know folk who make seed bombs and distribute them along waterways and other places that are suitable for attracting butterflies and bees. On the property where we live we slash our fire breaks in such a way that there are always interconnected natural areas where native grasses and weeds grow. As well as the pollinators which benefit from this we've seen an increase in small bird life such as quails, three types of finches and two types of fairy wrens. We've also planted native trees and flowers where and when we can although the soil is terrible clay and only certain kinds of eucalyptus trees thrive.
    Thank you for posting this awesome initiative.
    Gassho
    Anna
    ST
    On Ka
    穏 火
    aka Anna Kissed.
    No Gods No Masters.
    Life is too serious to be taken seriously.

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Anna View Post
    I know folk who make seed bombs and distribute them along waterways and other places that are suitable for attracting butterflies and bees. On the property where we live we slash our fire breaks in such a way that there are always interconnected natural areas where native grasses and weeds grow. As well as the pollinators which benefit from this we've seen an increase in small bird life such as quails, three types of finches and two types of fairy wrens. We've also planted native trees and flowers where and when we can although the soil is terrible clay and only certain kinds of eucalyptus trees thrive.
    Thank you for posting this awesome initiative.
    Gassho
    Anna
    ST
    That's beautiful to hear Anna! It really helps show the interconnected ecosystem we are in that a small ball of seeds can lead to flowers -> insects -> and then birds who also need the insects.

    Gassho,

    Tyler

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