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Thread: ARTS: Thirteen Ways of Reading a Haiku

  1. #1

    ARTS: Thirteen Ways of Reading a Haiku

    Hi all

    A very lovely piece by haiku poet Michael Dylan Welch which cuts to the heart of what haiku are about.

    http://www.graceguts.com/essays/thir...-reading-haiku

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday/lah-
    Last edited by Jundo; 01-24-2021 at 02:36 AM.
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  2. #2
    Member Onka's Avatar
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    May 2019
    Location
    rural queensland australia.
    Quote Originally Posted by Kokuu View Post
    Hi all

    A very lovely piece by haiku poet Michael Dylan Welch which cuts to the heart of what haiku are about.

    http://www.graceguts.com/essays/thir...-reading-haiku

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday/lah-
    Thank you Kokuu

    I have already worked out when I will read this essay tomorrow. I very much look forward to it.

    Gassho
    Anna

    Sat today
    穏 On (Calm)
    火 Ka (Fires)
    aka Anna Kissed.
    Pronouns She/Her They/Them.
    Life's too serious to be taken seriously.
    No Gods No Masters No Borders

  3. #3
    Thank you Kokuu

    Gassho
    Washin
    sattoday
    Kaido (有道) Every Way
    Washin (和信) Harmony Trust
    ----
    I am a novice priest-in-training. Anything what I say must not be considered as teaching
    and should be taken with a 'grain of salt'.

  4. #4
    Thank you Kokuu. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    Sat/LAH

  5. #5
    Kyotai
    Guest
    Wonderful. I must admit, poetry just doesnt speak to me, it never has. Perhaps I am just a simple fellow

    Gassho Kyotai
    ST LaH

    Sent from my SM-G950W using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    Thank you Kokuu!

    Gassho, Shinshi

    SaT-LaH
    空道 心志 Kudo Shinshi
    I am just a priest-in-training, any resemblance between what I post and actual teachings is purely coincidental.

  7. #7
    I must admit, poetry just doesnt speak to me, it never has. Perhaps I am just a simple fellow
    Some people like it, some people don't.

    There are plenty of art forms to go around and Zen has been expressed in words, images, sound and doubtless many other ways that can speak to people.

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday/lah-
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  8. #8
    Thank you Kokuu.

    Quote Originally Posted by Kyotai View Post
    Wonderful. I must admit, poetry just doesnt speak to me, it never has. Perhaps I am just a simple fellow
    In your sound- and land- scapes, I find something, that I am searching and finding in poetry, too.
    Thank you for making this kind of poetry ;-)

    I don't get tired, repeating these words from Muso Soseki:

    'The sounds of the stream splash out the Buddha's sermon.
    Don't say that the deepest meaning comes only from ones mouth.
    Day and night 80.000 poems arise one ofter the other
    and in fact, not a single word has ever been spoken.'

    Gassho,
    Kotei sat/lah today.

    義道 冴庭 / Gidou Kotei.
    Being a novice priest doesn't mean that my writing about the Dharma is more substantial than yours. Actually, it might well be the other way round.

  9. #9
    Thank you Kokuu, I loved this article and some of the examples of different haiku the author gives us particularly:

    Listening . . .
    After a while,
    I take up my axe again

    —Rod Willmot

    I don't know why it resonates with my so much but I can feel, hear and smell the forest when I read it. On the Realizing Genjokoan thread Shinshi made the point that reading Dogen is often like playing music - the space between the words (or notes) create the beauty - it seems the same with haiku and the author makes that point in that we the reader have to fill in the gaps and complete the picture. Beautiful.

    Deep bows.

    Neil

    StLah

  10. #10
    Hi Kokuu, this piece was a great find, there are some wonderful haiku there. Thanks for sharing.
    On a not wholly tangential note, do you recall if this thread has ever been used to write renga? Might be fun...
    Gassho,
    Mark
    Sat/LAH

  11. #11
    Thank you, Kokuu, for sharing this with us. I was having trouble relating to most haiku, but some of the haiku in the article resonated strongly for me. I also feel for Richard Wright's haiku (in Haiku: The Last Poems of an American Icon), although he wrote in the 5-7-5 syllable pattern. Haiku is gradually becoming more accessible to me overall.

    Gassho,
    Onkai
    Sat/lah
    On (Warm)
    Kai (Sea)
    I have a lot to learn; take anything I say that sounds like teaching with a grain of salt.

  12. #12
    Hi Onkai

    I think that like with any form of poetry or other art form, it is a question of finding material you like as a way in. Richard Wright is a great writer.

    I don't mind 5-7-5 poetry when it is done well. The reason I steer people away from it at first is that many writers tend to focus more on syllable counting rather than the content of the poem. Once they have learned how haiku are written, they can do as they like!

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

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