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Thread: "Simple Living" - Chapters 9 and 10

  1. #1

    "Simple Living" - Chapters 9 and 10

    Just jump in if joining, no "catch up" ... just today is today ...

    Chapter 8 - A few times, offer vibrant greetings (Good Morning!) to people, really conscious of your breath coming from deep in the diaphragm, back straight. Or, if you are offering a Chant such as the 'Verse of Atonement' or 'Four Vows," and are usually a quiet chanter, do so at least once in a loud and vigorous voice in the same way. Or you might recite a poem like so. (We have some members with breathing problems: Just breathe one's best, but be conscious of how the breath and words merge).

    Chapter 9 - Have one meal this week in which you put the phone or reading material down, just eat in silence, experiencing the food. If you think about something, leave the politics and personal problems completely aside, and just think about the food ... where it came from, the ground and sun and rain, the farmers and truck drivers, the life it brings etc ...

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    Last edited by Jundo; 07-17-2019 at 02:25 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  2. #2
    Thank you Jundo, I will be adding these actions to my day tomorrow and throughout the week. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    Sat/LAH
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

  3. #3
    Once a week I chant in a group (taoist chants) in a loud voice, no problem, I eaven chant the “lead” at times. But at home, chanting alone, it feels a bit awkward to chant out loud. But I will try

    Gassho/SatToday
    流道
    Ryū Dou

  4. #4
    Member Seishin's Avatar
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    Aug 2016
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    La Croix-Avranchin, Basse Normandie, France
    Initial observations on Chapter 8.

    Although I chant Atonement and Four Vows daily, due to household logistics and my wife's health (chanting is when sitting first thing when she is still resting) I tend to be very quiet, almost a whisper. Strangely, if I am putting on my Rakusu I will chant the Robe Verse in Japanese and offer the Three Vows in Japanese when taking it off. For these chants I tend to be more vocal (from low down inside trying to emulate Rev Taigu ) although controlling the volume and this seems to create a greater affinity to my actions. I would be extremely interested to hear and learn a Japanese version of Treeleaf's Verse of Atonement and The Four Vows. I did try translating The Verse of Atonment via Google Translation and creating a recording and tweaking it in my Digital Audio Workstation software but both the original and "mixed" version still remain robotic and mechanical. And being Google I'd probably question the translation as well.

    すべての有害な言葉の考えや行動
    昔から私が犯したことがある
    初心者なしの欲、怒りと無知のゆえに
    私の体、口、そして心から生まれました
    今、私は彼ら全員を贖った

    Subete no yūgaina kotoba no kangae ya kōdō mukashikara
    watashi ga okashita koto ga aru shoshinsha nashi no yoku,
    ikari to muchi no yueni watashi no karada,-guchi,
    soshite kokorokara umaremashita ima,
    watashi wa karera zen'in o aganatta
    Food for thought ...........................ah and on to Chapter 9


    Seishin

    Sei - Meticulous
    Shin - Heart

  5. #5
    Hello,
    4 days a week, I am running in the mornings and greeting everyone (not that many), I meet with a vibrant 'Moin' (Northern Germany's version of Hello).
    Interestingly different reactions ;-).
    I got used to chanting the (japanese) robe verse in a vibrant low voice. Three times with three deep breaths. Followed by the Heart Sutra. After sitting, the Verse of Atonement and Four Vows.

    Will practice Oryoki tomorrow with the mentioned mindset.

    Gassho,
    Kotei sat/lah today.
    古庭 KoTei / Ralf

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Seishin View Post
    Initial observations on Chapter 8.

    Although I chant Atonement and Four Vows daily, due to household logistics and my wife's health (chanting is when sitting first thing when she is still resting) I tend to be very quiet, almost a whisper. Strangely, if I am putting on my Rakusu I will chant the Robe Verse in Japanese and offer the Three Vows in Japanese when taking it off. For these chants I tend to be more vocal (from low down inside trying to emulate Rev Taigu ) although controlling the volume and this seems to create a greater affinity to my actions. I would be extremely interested to hear and learn a Japanese version of Treeleaf's Verse of Atonement and The Four Vows. I did try translating The Verse of Atonment via Google Translation and creating a recording and tweaking it in my Digital Audio Workstation software but both the original and "mixed" version still remain robotic and mechanical. And being Google I'd probably question the translation as well.



    Food for thought ...........................ah and on to Chapter 9
    Maybe everyone is overthinking this one. This is not chanting practice. Just say "Good Morning!" (Buenos Dias!) to you wife/husband/dog once or twice with a nice deep breath. You are done.

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  7. #7
    8) On my commute to work the past couple of mornings I've taken to waving (which is just lifting your hand up, palm out here) at anyone I pass driving along the city park I go through. I usually get a wave back and sometimes a smile. I'm hoping it brightens their day - it certainly made me feel nice. At work, I told everyone Good Morning / exchanged greetings before settling down at my desk. I didn't rush back and forth but took my time walking around the floor and office. Ready for the day.

    Gassho
    Kendrick
    SAT

  8. #8
    Done and done. Thank you!

    gassho
    doyu sat today
    特別な人ではない

  9. #9
    Treeleaf Unsui Geika's Avatar
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    Jan 2010
    Location
    San Diego County, California
    "Good morning!" is part of my job, but it has lead to me saying it to pretty much anyone I pass in the AM. There are a lot of things that working in customer service makes you more confident about in daily life...

    Gassho

    Sat today, lah
    求道芸化 Kyudo Geika
    I am just a priest-in-training, please do not take anything I say as a teaching.

  10. #10
    Member Seishin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    Maybe everyone is overthinking this one. This is not chanting practice. Just say "Good Morning!" (Buenos Dias!) to you wife/husband/dog once or twice with a nice deep breath. You are done.

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    Jundo

    While out walking our dog I offer many vibrant Bonjours to those I encounter and as one would expect, get mixed receptions from an equally vibrant response, a grunt or complete blank. Interestingly where I am walking many of those I encounter are on holiday and visiting the nearby Mont St Michel. Oddly so many are grumpy and miserable despite being on their jollies. Where has the joy and happiness gone in the world ?

    As to the chanting you did ask
    Or, if you are offering a Chant such as the 'Verse of Atonement' or 'Four Vows," and are usually a quiet chanter, do so at least once in a loud and vigorous voice in the same way.
    ..........................


    Seishin

    Sei - Meticulous
    Shin - Heart

  11. #11
    Hey folks,

    I have a funny story to tell you. Where I live, which is a small townish kind of place everyone says hello to everyone, it is actually very nice. But when I first came here from the big city of Calgary, no one said hello to anyone, especially not to strangers walking down the street. It is weird when I go back to the big city and I still have that small town attitude ... looking at people wanting to say hello, good morning, how's it going. Instead, most folks look away.

    So I really like this practice when in the moment of our day we can take a moment, look at someone, and give them a warm and genuine greeting. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    Sat/LAH
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    Chapter 9 - Have one meal this week in which you put the phone or reading material down, just eat in silence, experiencing the food. If you think about something, leave the politics and personal problems completely aside, and just think about the food ... where it came from, the ground and sun and rain, the farmers and truck drivers, the life it brings etc ...
    I like this one, in part because I have long known farmers. My ex-wife's father was a farmer (fruits and vegetables, in Provence), and I currently live next to a farm in England. My landlord farms 200 acres, and there is a wheat field across the road from me that I see out of the window in my home office. In addition, I have known other farmers who raise livestock and grow things.

    I guess this is pretty basic for me, though when I was growing up in New York City, I wouldn't have understood things the same way. It's a good idea for people to see farms every now and then; perhaps take a vacation to a rural area and see how things grow.

    Gassho,

    Kirk
    I know nothing.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Seishin View Post

    While out walking our dog I offer many vibrant Bonjours to those I encounter and as one would expect, get mixed receptions from an equally vibrant response, a grunt or complete blank. Interestingly where I am walking many of those I encounter are on holiday and visiting the nearby Mont St Michel. Oddly so many are grumpy and miserable despite being on their jollies. Where has the joy and happiness gone in the world ?
    One thing about France is that it is relatively common for people to say Bonjour, monsieur, or Bonjour, madame, or even the one I like best, Bonjour messieurs-dames, when going into stores. This is less common in big cities, but as I lived in a rural area in France for a long time, it was de rigueur.

    Living in a rural area in England, it is relatively common to at least nod when you walk past someone, though people don't say hello in stores. What did bother me when I first moved to this country is that people working in a store will come up to you and say, "Are you all right?" as a way to engage you and see if you need help. That phrase, however, makes me think there's something wrong with me that I can't see.

    Gassho,

    Kirk
    I know nothing.

  14. #14
    In considering Jundo’s tasks for this week, I find one just fits in fine with a small West Texas town. Each morning the local Post Office is a meet and greet place. Have something in your arms, the door will open, struggling to get packages into your pickup, arms will reach out to help, and for everyone, it is a face to face, sincere “Morning”, or “howdy”. It's interesting that our community is changing and is mostly tied to ranching however a vibrant art community is becoming part and full-time residents hailing from New York, Huston, and other large metro areas. Funny to see how uncomfortable those folks are with familiarity. The good thing, it is not the old community that is changing, but slowly you see bewilderment “who are you” expressions change to at least a shy smile. As far as mindful meals go, that is going to take some thought. My wife and I certainly have slipped into lazy eating routines since retirement!

    SAT TODAY (and said “howdy” to my neighbor.
    Shozan

  15. #15
    Member Seishin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by kirkmc View Post
    One thing about France is that it is relatively common for people to say Bonjour, monsieur, or Bonjour, madame, or even the one I like best, Bonjour messieurs-dames, when going into stores. This is less common in big cities, but as I lived in a rural area in France for a long time, it was de rigueur.

    Living in a rural area in England, it is relatively common to at least nod when you walk past someone, though people don't say hello in stores. What did bother me when I first moved to this country is that people working in a store will come up to you and say, "Are you all right?" as a way to engage you and see if you need help. That phrase, however, makes me think there's something wrong with me that I can't see.

    Gassho,

    Kirk
    Kirk

    Have to agree with you as I always found that an odd greeting. I'd rather they say "Can I help you with anything ?" would better but a simple hello would also suffice. As for England and my first 55 years there, I found the friendliness and greetings diminished over time. Before heading over here we lived on a "nice" estate on the outskirts of Wakefield for 18 years, as now I would always greet people and try and engage them but so many so called neighbours, even a few doors either side of us, remained aloof and cold. I know thats not true of all the UK having moved around the country over the years but going back last year, it seemed to have got worse. Kinda head down stare at the sidewalk and say nothing, so refreshing to get back home and embrace the engagement of my fellow "country men and women". A smile and a Hello cost nothing and returns huge dividends, so simple.


    Seishin

    Sei - Meticulous
    Shin - Heart

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Seishin View Post
    Kirk

    Have to agree with you as I always found that an odd greeting. I'd rather they say "Can I help you with anything ?" would better but a simple hello would also suffice. As for England and my first 55 years there, I found the friendliness and greetings diminished over time. Before heading over here we lived on a "nice" estate on the outskirts of Wakefield for 18 years, as now I would always greet people and try and engage them but so many so called neighbours, even a few doors either side of us, remained aloof and cold. I know thats not true of all the UK having moved around the country over the years but going back last year, it seemed to have got worse. Kinda head down stare at the sidewalk and say nothing, so refreshing to get back home and embrace the engagement of my fellow "country men and women". A smile and a Hello cost nothing and returns huge dividends, so simple.
    I live on the edge of a small village, and people do say hello. Next to my house are some holiday cottages, run by my landlord, and the guests generally say hello as well. But once I go into the bigger town nearby, everything changes. (To be fair, it's Stratford-upon-Avon, quite a touristy town.)

    But it generally ends with hello, how's the weather. There's not much interaction beyond that. The British are a bit skittish about making friends.

    To be fair, it's not that easy to make friends anywhere. In France, when raising a child, I made a number of friends among other parents of kids at my son's schools, but never really among neighbors.

    Gassho,

    Kirk
    I know nothing.

  17. #17
    Quote Originally Posted by kirkmc View Post
    I live on the edge of a small village, and people do say hello. Next to my house are some holiday cottages, run by my landlord, and the guests generally say hello as well. But once I go into the bigger town nearby, everything changes. (To be fair, it's Stratford-upon-Avon, quite a touristy town.)

    But it generally ends with hello, how's the weather. There's not much interaction beyond that. The British are a bit skittish about making friends.

    To be fair, it's not that easy to make friends anywhere. In France, when raising a child, I made a number of friends among other parents of kids at my son's schools, but never really among neighbors.

    Gassho,

    Kirk
    Quote Originally Posted by Seishin View Post
    Kirk

    Have to agree with you as I always found that an odd greeting. I'd rather they say "Can I help you with anything ?" would better but a simple hello would also suffice. As for England and my first 55 years there, I found the friendliness and greetings diminished over time. Before heading over here we lived on a "nice" estate on the outskirts of Wakefield for 18 years, as now I would always greet people and try and engage them but so many so called neighbours, even a few doors either side of us, remained aloof and cold. I know thats not true of all the UK having moved around the country over the years but going back last year, it seemed to have got worse. Kinda head down stare at the sidewalk and say nothing, so refreshing to get back home and embrace the engagement of my fellow "country men and women". A smile and a Hello cost nothing and returns huge dividends, so simple.
    Hey there folks,

    Thank you for your views on this topic, but can you please remember the "Sat today" and "LAH" rule ...

    Gassho
    Shingen

    Sat/LAH
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

  18. #18
    Member Seishin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2016
    Location
    La Croix-Avranchin, Basse Normandie, France
    Quote Originally Posted by Shingen View Post
    Hey there folks,

    Thank you for your views on this topic, but can you please remember the "Sat today" and "LAH" rule ...

    Gassho
    Shingen

    Sat/LAH
    Sorry Shingen

    Just dropped them from my signature and getting into the habit of typing it for each post.

    Sat / lah


    Seishin

    Sei - Meticulous
    Shin - Heart

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Seishin View Post
    Sorry Shingen

    Just dropped them from my signature and getting into the habit of typing it for each post.

    Sat / lah
    All good Seishin, thank you. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    Sat/LAH
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

  20. #20
    I am in the habit of saying good morning but this week Iíve tried to put a little bit more presence behind it rather than just being routine.

    I like the exercise of sitting to a meal without distractions. This is generally on of my yearly Ango commitments to sit and eat at least one meal this way. Focusing on the meal and reflecting on all the sentient and non-sentient beings past and present that contributed so that I can be nourished is humbling. I find it really connects me with the Meal Gatha (which I recite regularly) and brings into focus how truly interconnected we are with that around us.


    Tairin
    Sat today and lah
    泰林 - Tai Rin - Peaceful Woods

  21. #21
    Started greeting my wife and pets with loud voice in the morning.
    Commuted to one meal fully present per day this week. Kind of zazen while eating; constantly having to return to eating when my mind go elsewhere.
    Gassho,
    Mateus
    Sat today/LAH

  22. #22
    When I woke up two days ago I greeted my wife with a deep good morning from the tanden area. She laughed and asked me what that was about. I told her it was Buddhist practice from Treeleaf . I've been applying chapter nine to each dinner. Yesterday I remembered when I was already halfway. Will continue tomorrow.

    Gassho,
    Jack
    Sattoday/lah

  23. #23
    GOOD MORNING, TREELEAF!

    gassho
    doyu sat and lah today
    特別な人ではない

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Doyū View Post
    GOOD MORNING, TREELEAF!

    gassho
    doyu sat and lah today
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Doyū View Post
    GOOD MORNING, TREELEAF!

    gassho
    doyu sat and lah today
    Love!

    Here in small town Italy, it's absolutely the norm to say Hello to everyone when you enter a shop, and to say Hello/Goodbye to everyone else who enters and leaves. People often say Hello in the street once they've seen you a couple of times, as well as this being a small town, the area in which you live tends to be like a small village, thanks to lots of small shops and services, so all very friendly - all this despite the fact that I'm an immigrant and would never be taken for an Italian, no matter how long I live here So I'll just amp it up a bit now! I do sometimes chant at a normal volume, I'll do that more often too.

    I very rarely eat alone, so complying with the second practice could be difficult - I do try to keep up my oryoki practice once a week, so that counts for the good.
    Gassho
    Meitou
    satwithyoualltoday
    命 Mei - life
    島 Tou - island

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