Results 1 to 18 of 18

Thread: Juzu beads

  1. #1

    Juzu beads

    I know from previous discussions here that juzu beads are not a thing in Soto zen. I'm learning the shakuhachi, and some performers in videos I've seen wear a rakusu when performing, and I've even seen a couple wearing juzu beads, such as Kifu Mitsuhashi here:

    Screen Shot 2019-05-14 at 4.42.39 PM.jpg

    He's also got beads around his wrist.

    I haven't found anything about him to say which flavor of zen he's involved in, but from his garb, does he look like a Soto practitioner?

    Kirk

    Sat today
    I know nothing.

  2. #2
    Hi kirkmc!

    Hard to say from that pic alone, but judging by the rakusu style and what seem to be small logos on the sleeves, I would say it is more like Jodo Shinshu's wisteria logo. See pic below:

    cmn_footerlogo.jpg

    Also, I'm no expert on juzu, but traditionally, the Soto Zen ones have a small metal ring on them, like this:

    jyu-s233_1_w360.jpg

    But it's hard to say because he covers the one on the neck with his hands, and those on his wrist look like generic juzu beads.

    Cheers!

  3. #3
    i looked at several pages in Japanese with his biography, but i cannot see where he received Jukai. However, the Rakusu is more in a formal, and very fancy, Rinzai style. The beads are also large. However, the Shakuhachil folks may also bestow Rakusu wilthin the Shakuhachi lineages. l am not sure.

    The mon on his haori is probably his own family crest, or his school of Shakuhachi, rather than Buddhist.

    Gassho, J

    STLah

    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by ESMP View Post

    Also, I'm no expert on juzu, but traditionally, the Soto Zen ones have a small metal ring on them, like this:

    jyu-s233_1_w360.jpg
    That is true. However, average Japanese don't tend to follow such sect distinctions these days, and tend to wear a generic Juzu. Most lay people wear them just for funerals and memorial services for the ancestors, or (as in the one on his wrist made of some crystal) as a protective amulet for the "power."

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  5. #5
    PS - The family crest on his robes look like the one for Jodo Shinshu, but is different if you look closely. Actually, there are many many that look similar except for tiny differences ...

    http://www.hari-kamon.com/plant/Page/FUJI/index.html
    Last edited by Jundo; 05-15-2019 at 11:54 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  6. #6
    Hi Kirk

    I have no idea about the rakusu or lineage but interesting that you are learning the shakuhachi! How are you finding it?

    Some years ago, I had a sick day on a retreat and spent the time in bed reading a short book I found in the library. It was about an English guy who learned to play the shakuhachi through an accidental meeting with a Japanese master. I really enjoyed it and it was especially interesting about how part of learning was building up his lung capacity and stamina through running up hills!

    You may know it already - Blowing Zen (https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/...16-blowing-zen).

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  7. #7
    Kokuu,

    Yes, I've read that book. It's quite interesting.

    I had long been fascinated by the sound of the shakuhachi, and started playing a bit more than a year ago. It's not easy, but it's a fascinating instrument. What I really like is the way it connects my body and my breath, and becomes all-encompassing. I'm still at the very early stages, but it's taught me a lot about frustration, expectations, and the slow, gradual path of learning.

    Gasho,

    Kirk

    sat
    I know nothing.

  8. #8
    Hi Kirk,

    I've seen a very similar Rakusu worn by a Ukrainian Shakplayer, named Un Ryuu (雲龍)
    He received his Rakusu from his Meian (Myoan) style teacher Ejun Lechika from a Rinzai lineage.


    Gassho,
    Kotei sat/lah today.
    Last edited by Kotei; 05-15-2019 at 01:42 PM.
    古庭 KoTei / Ralf

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by kirkmc View Post
    Kokuu,

    Yes, I've read that book. It's quite interesting.

    I had long been fascinated by the sound of the shakuhachi, and started playing a bit more than a year ago. It's not easy, but it's a fascinating instrument. What I really like is the way it connects my body and my breath, and becomes all-encompassing. I'm still at the very early stages, but it's taught me a lot about frustration, expectations, and the slow, gradual path of learning.

    Gasho,

    Kirk

    sat
    Hi Kirk, are you teaching yourself or have you found a teacher? Such a beautiful instrument, keep us up to date with your progress. I'm going to take a look at the book Kokuu mentioned.
    Gassho
    Meitou
    Satwithyoualltoday lah
    命 Mei - life
    島 Tou - island

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by ESMP View Post
    Hi kirkmc!

    Hard to say from that pic alone, but judging by the rakusu style and what seem to be small logos on the sleeves, I would say it is more like Jodo Shinshu's wisteria logo. See pic below:

    cmn_footerlogo.jpg

    Also, I'm no expert on juzu, but traditionally, the Soto Zen ones have a small metal ring on them, like this:

    jyu-s233_1_w360.jpg

    But it's hard to say because he covers the one on the neck with his hands, and those on his wrist look like generic juzu beads.

    Cheers!

    What is the difference between Juzu versus mala beads, or are they different names for the same concept?

    gassho
    kim
    st
    "Not all those who wander are lost." (J.R.R. Tolkien)

  11. #11
    I have a teacher. There are a number of people who teach via Skype. My teacher is in Denmark.

    I've made a small website about my journey, though I haven't posted in a while;

    https://www.honkyoku.com

    Gassho,

    Kirk

    sat
    I know nothing.

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by allwhowander View Post
    What is the difference between Juzu versus mala beads, or are they different names for the same concept?

    gassho
    kim
    st
    Hi Kim!

    Juzu is the Japanese word for mala if I remember correctly. There are several different styles and bead numbers, although 108 is the more common. You may also encounter it as Nenju in Japanese. I don't remember if there is a difference between Nenju and Juzu. Perhaps Jundo could elaborate on that.

    Here are pictures of both my 108 bead mala and my smaller Juzu (Commonly used in Jodo Shinshu) I began my journey in the Shin school before gradually migrating toward Zen!



    Gassho,
    Junkyo
    SAT

    Sent from my SM-G955W using Tapatalk

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by allwhowander View Post
    What is the difference between Juzu versus mala beads, or are they different names for the same concept?

    gassho
    kim
    st
    Yes, Juzu is just the Japanese name, same as the Catholic prayer beads, by the way, on the other side of the silk road. All the nerve endings in the finger tips are hypnotic.

    Here is more information than you probably want or need, from a recent thread.

    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...l=1#post239026

    Gassho, Jundo

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    Yes, Juzu is just the Japanese name, same as the Catholic prayer beads, by the way, on the other side of the silk road. All the nerve endings in the finger tips are hypnotic.

    Here is more information than you probably want or need, from a recent thread.

    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...l=1#post239026

    Gassho, Jundo

    STLah

    To the contrary, Jundo -- as we say in autism world, this (prayer beads and related sacramentals) is one of my "special interest" topics I even have dorje's for my beads -- for the Tibetan tradition, but I do tend to collect these items.

    You have given me a link to a wealth of information to explore and enjoy; I love topics like this. It's another reason why monasteries and temples fascinate me.

    Much appreciated.

    gassho
    kim
    st. lh
    "Not all those who wander are lost." (J.R.R. Tolkien)

  15. #15
    Hello!

    I have a question that I feel fits in this discussion. If not, please don't hesitate to point me in the right direction!

    I know that the Heart Sutra has a mantra within its text, and I've read several accounts of profound impacts it can have on people who chant it regularly. How does one in the Soto tradition chant mantras? Is it radically different than using a mala to count repetitions?

    Gassho,

    Dylan
    Sat today
    Last edited by dylank91; 05-31-2019 at 02:52 AM.

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by dylank91 View Post
    Hello!

    I have a question that I feel fits in this discussion. If not, please don't hesitate to point me in the right direction!

    I know that the Heart Sutra has a mantra within its text, and I've read several accounts of profound impacts it can have on people who chant it regularly. How does one in the Soto tradition chant mantras? Is it radically different than using a mala to count repetitions?

    Gassho,

    Dylan
    Sat today
    Hi Dylan,

    We had this come up just recently in another thread.

    Personally, I am a pretty down to earth guy who does not take such things for any "hocus-pocus," but who does recognize that there may be some soothing hypnotic or psychological effects in such activities. I also feel that the Teachings on "Emptiness" (the Wisdom) are the real Mantra of the Heart Sutra if one looks closely, not so much the words at the end. You can read the whole thread here.

    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...l=1#post238892

    Gassho, Jundo

    SatTodayLAH

    PS - When you get a chance, please introduce yourself to the folks here. Thank you.

    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...8June%29/page2
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  17. #17
    I'm sure this has been addressed elsewhere here - sorry if this is repetition. You can find prayer beads, juzu, rosaries, etc. etc. made out of wood, stone, string (I will have to post one of my favorites I call it the "flaming lips" rosary!) and these things are used in Buddhism, Islam, Christianity - pretty much of all forms. Are repeating 'matram' superstitious? I suppose it can be, but if it creates peace I'm not sure if that's all bad...also I've seen people grow...from "I'm doing this so I can get what I want" to "I'm doing this to get in accord, be one with ok with?? how things are..."
    gassho,
    sean
    sat.lan

  18. #18
    Rosary.jpg

    Behold...I'm sure Wayne Coyne would approve.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •