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Thread: What to do with tiny Buddhas?

  1. #1

    What to do with tiny Buddhas?

    Since joining Treeleaf, I have become more aware of what it's like to live in a world in which the dominant expressions of faith are not sensitive to people of other faiths. To be less oblique: I see the Buddha referenced by people and in contexts that feel like a total misuse. For example, my company offers a mindfulness class over lunch. You can already guess that their idea of mindfulness is different from what we might say--but that doesn't bother me. What bothers me is that the leader gave out tiny jade Buddhas and told people to put him on their windshields so that the Buddha could keep them safe while they drove.

    I thought, "why is that okay?" If the leader gave out tiny jade Jesus statues, people would complain to HR. But somehow tiny mystical driving Buddhas for everyone is fine?

    I made a fuss and my friend put her tiny jade Buddha away. But I did not go to HR. Partly because I'm still not sure what I think. Buddha is everywhere. He sits in he corner of my local yoga studio even though there is nothing overtly Buddhist about hot power workout yoga. Buddha is on jewelry at the mall. Buddha is on notebooks and t-shirts and garden stores.

    I've very glad to see Buddha wherever I go, and I don't mind that many of the people who've placed him there are not Buddhist. Maybe it's just that little green safe driving Buddha that irks me.

    Please let me know what you think.

    Gassho,

    Kate
    Sat today / lah
    Kate

  2. #2
    Well, I see no problem with it. I would think that one of the Christian folks would be more likely to object. I personally don't have a tiny Buddha in my car, but my wife and mother-in-law do put protective Shinto amulets on our kids' school bags. They look like this, and are found all over Japan ... some are even cute ...


    Personally, I don't think that they do much, nor the little Buddha in the windscreen, but they do make people feel better.

    In some places in Asia, such as Thailand and Taiwan, this is very common ...


    Also, some temples do this in Japan ...


    Not my cup of tea ... but the wife totaled our car last month, and I had a fender bender ... so maybe I should consider it!

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    Last edited by Jundo; 05-09-2019 at 02:28 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  3. #3
    In Thailand, however, it is illegal to misuse images of Buddha. Such as these.

    Of course, for Zen people, "Buddha" is found everywhere, head to toe and in the clean and dirty ... so not so much a problem. Still, I can see how some folks would object ...

    https://rendezvous.blogs.nytimes.com...at-the-buddha/





    Here in Japan, there was a minor uproar because they were selling a candy called "Buddha Snot" ...

    The package says ":Boogers from the nose of the Lord Buddha", and it was apparently sold at the gift shops near one of the most famous Buddhist temples in Japan.

    The Telegraph reports that priests at one of Japan's most famous temples have taken steps to block the sale of a sweet marketed as the "Snot from the nose of the Great Buddha". They have prevented the name being registered as a trade mark office, but have been unable to stop vendors selling the sweets to hordes of tourists who flock to see the giant Buddha in the ancient capital, Nara, in western Japan. Yamamoto Bussan, the company that launched the sweet three years ago, has said that in a recession a product name needs to make a strong impact. A spokesman said some employees had doubts about the name, so it was decided to attach the ultra-polite suffix sama to Buddha's name. But the sweet's packaging shows an irreverent picture of Buddha picking his nose.


    You may enjoy the rest of the below old thread, which also featured the God-Jesus Robot windup toy ...



    https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/show...ll=1#post28365

    Gassho, J
    Last edited by Jundo; 05-09-2019 at 02:44 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Kate View Post
    What bothers me is that the leader gave out tiny jade Buddhas and told people to put him on their windshields so that the Buddha could keep them safe while they drove.

    I thought, "why is that okay?" If the leader gave out tiny jade Jesus statues, people would complain to HR. But somehow tiny mystical driving Buddhas for everyone is fine?
    Please let me know what you think.

    Gassho,

    Kate
    Sat today / lah
    Sounds like the leader was a convert buddhist, because that's just like the christian St. Christoper medals everybody in my catholic area used to have in their car.
    That is until St Christopher got demoted officially to just a mythological figure.

    sat/lah

    Kyousui - strong waters 強 水

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post

    In some places in Asia, such as Thailand and Taiwan, this is very common ...

    ...
    70% of taxi dashboards in Ho Chi Minh City look just like that, except with indigenous and Chinese deities alongside Buddha. The other 30% have crucifixes and Virgins Mary instead.

    Gassho,
    Kyōshin
    Satlah

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

  6. #6
    That's an interesting question that I hadn't considered. I'm not sure I'm personally that bothered about statues of the Buddha, I think I get more puzzled by the constant out of context use of the word 'Zen'.

    Gassho,

    Neil

    STLaH

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by EnlistedHipster View Post
    That's an interesting question that I hadn't considered. I'm not sure I'm personally that bothered about statues of the Buddha, I think I get more puzzled by the constant out of context use of the word 'Zen'.

    Gassho,

    Neil

    STLaH
    Same here. I'm a much more irritated by indiscriminate use of the word 'Zen' than I am by little Buddha figurines. People see a Buddha statue on my shelf and say "how nice." People hear the word Zen and suddenly I'm explaining for the millionth time, no my religion does not involve taking bong rips in front of said Buddha statue and being blissed out all the time, and yes I am actually allowed to have the full range of human emotions even the cranky ones.

    Gassho,
    Kyōshin
    Satlah

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Kate View Post
    Since joining Treeleaf, I have become more aware of what it's like to live in a world in which the dominant expressions of faith are not sensitive to people of other faiths. To be less oblique: I see the Buddha referenced by people and in contexts that feel like a total misuse. For example, my company offers a mindfulness class over lunch. You can already guess that their idea of mindfulness is different from what we might say--but that doesn't bother me. What bothers me is that the leader gave out tiny jade Buddhas and told people to put him on their windshields so that the Buddha could keep them safe while they drove.

    I thought, "why is that okay?" If the leader gave out tiny jade Jesus statues, people would complain to HR. But somehow tiny mystical driving Buddhas for everyone is fine?

    I made a fuss and my friend put her tiny jade Buddha away. But I did not go to HR. Partly because I'm still not sure what I think. Buddha is everywhere. He sits in he corner of my local yoga studio even though there is nothing overtly Buddhist about hot power workout yoga. Buddha is on jewelry at the mall. Buddha is on notebooks and t-shirts and garden stores.

    I've very glad to see Buddha wherever I go, and I don't mind that many of the people who've placed him there are not Buddhist. Maybe it's just that little green safe driving Buddha that irks me.

    Please let me know what you think.

    Gassho,

    Kate
    Sat today / lah
    My take on this is that object is not sacred in and of itself - it is our interaction with the object that makes it sacred or secular. So the whole world can be (is) sacred if we view it that way and it can be secular at the same time - depending on how we engage with it.

    So, for me, I don't get upset by people who do things like put Buddha statues in their car or house as long as they aren't malicious in their intent. If someone is using a religious symbol as a way of expressing hate or intolerance that is something completely different.

    It can be an opportunity for a little education, or to open a dialogue with that person about what Buddhism meas to you.

    And maybe having the Buddha around will make them feel a little better. Or maybe even spark in interest in learning more about Buddhism.


    This reminded me of when I was in my 20s and just learning about Buddhism. There was a Japanese Restaurant in Minneapolis that served drinks in mugs like this:



    I always wondered what people would do if a restaurant started to serve drinks with a straw coming out of the Pope's belly.

    Gassho, Shinshi

    SaT-LaH
    空道 心志 Kudo Shinshi
    I am just a priest-in-training, any resemblance between what I post and actual teachings is purely coincidental.

  9. #9
    [хлопки]
    [Gassholook]:Будда:: TL:

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by EnlistedHipster View Post
    That's an interesting question that I hadn't considered. I'm not sure I'm personally that bothered about statues of the Buddha, I think I get more puzzled by the constant out of context use of the word 'Zen'.

    Gassho,

    Neil

    STLaH
    Neil,
    I'm the same. I go to the grocery store and see zen shampoo, zen soft drinks, etc. If you asked these marketing execs who came up with this for a definition of zen I doubt they could do it. Even some of the people closest to me don't even know I practice. Some have some vague idea that it is some kind of relaxation technique or something. I just cant be bothered explaining.
    A few weeks ago I went to pick up some Chinese take out food and at the cash register they have some little buddha statues. I bought one and the Chinese woman behind the counter said, Oh yes, for good luck! Sigh.

    Gassho, STlah
    James

  11. #11
    I must say that that would bother me just a bit too. Just like it slightly bothers me lately to find that mala have become a fashion accessory and devoid of meaning. For example, this one which is made as apparel for fans of University of Virginia sports. That said, seeing the comments by Jundo and others, this helps me to have a better view of it and I think in time, I'll be able to let it stop bothering me

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
    "Heaven is right where you are standing, and that is the place to train"-Ueshiba Morihei

  12. #12
    Commercialization of religion has always bothered me, both when I was a Baptist and now that I'm a Buddhist. "Jesus and the money changers" was and is one of my favorite stories, naturally!

    Lion's Roar used to have a column called "Dharma Burgers" that pointed out, with some amusement, the mainstream adoption of Buddhist terms.

    What to do? Smile and move on. If the moment is suitable, as Shinshi suggests take the opportunity to teach.

    EDIT: I was recently on vacation in Sedona, AZ. The whole place is a "New Age" spiritual tourism Mecca and I've never seen so many Buddhas in an American town. I had very mixed feelings about it, but it generated multiple conversations about my Buddhism with my in-laws. Which was a good thing!

    Sat today. Gassho.
    Last edited by Ryushi; 05-09-2019 at 04:37 PM.


    No merit. Vast emptiness; nothing holy. I don't know.

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Ryushi View Post
    Commercialization of religion has always bothered me, both when I was a Baptist and now that I'm a Buddhist. "Jesus and the money changers" was and is one of my favorite stories, naturally!

    Lion's Roar used to have a column called "Dharma Burgers" that pointed out, with some amusement, the mainstream adoption of Buddhist terms.

    What to do? Smile and move on. If the moment is suitable, as Shinshi suggests take the opportunity to teach.

    EDIT: I was recently on vacation in Sedona, AZ. The whole place is a "New Age" spiritual tourism Mecca and I've never seen so many Buddhas in an American town. I had very mixed feelings about it, but it generated multiple conversations about my Buddhism with my in-laws. Which was a good thing!

    Sat today. Gassho.
    You'd definitely have some mixed feelings about Asheville, NC then! Particularly downtown.

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
    "Heaven is right where you are standing, and that is the place to train"-Ueshiba Morihei

  14. #14
    That is an interesting question. Personally, I would rather be pleased that Buddha is so well accepted, rather than upset that Buddha is not being shown religious reverence. I think Buddha meant to be a teacher more than a founder of a religion. People may be more inclined to look into his teachings when Buddhist traditions and art are an ingrained part of mainstream culture. Baby steps.

    Buddhism lends itself to the secular world more so than Christianity and most other religions. Maybe because today it is less fantastical and uniquely practical. Maybe because its history is not so controversial.

    Everybody likes a little Buddha. I put a Buddha next to my outdoor bonsai tree and a bird took it. Even the birds like a little Buddha.

    Gassho,
    Wuyi
    Sat/LAH
    無依 Mui
    "Relies on Nothing"

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by Shinshi View Post

    This reminded me of when I was in my 20s and just learning about Buddhism. There was a Japanese Restaurant in Minneapolis that served drinks in mugs like this:


    Since Buddha wishes to quench our thirsts in life, I have no problem with this. (Maybe only if there were booze inside).

    Here, by the way, is a little information on "Hotei", the "pudgy Buddha" sometimes said to be Maitreya that is probably best known from Chinese restaurants and such ...

    The image of Hotei is almost always seen carrying a cloth or linen sack. It is usually filled with many precious items, including candy for children, food, or the woes of the world. Sometimes it can be filled with children, as they are seen as some of those precious items of this world. In some scenes he may be found sitting on a cart drawn by boys.

    The large, fat belly is a symbol of happiness, luck, and generosity.

    The name Hotei actually means "cloth bag" or "glutton." A legend has it that if a person is to rub his belly, it brings forth wealth, good luck, and prosperity.

    The Laughing Buddha, also known as Hotei in Japan, Pu-Tai in China, embodies the ideals of the good life: health, happiness, prosperity and longevity.

    Monks and commercial travelers spread the Buddhist message throughout the East, northward into Afganistan and Tibet, eastward to China and Japan, as well as south into Ceylon and Indonesia. As with any religious message, changes in the nature of Buddhist practice and understanding were inevitable as the religion was absorbed within different cultures.

    Scholars have long commented on the contrast between India’s penchant for lofty idealisms as against the Chinese focus on the practicalities of the here-and-now. Over the centuries within China, Buddhist notions of happiness based on self-mastery and enlightened insight were fused with popular Chinese life-ideals of happiness through material prosperity.

    Iconographers in the 10th century summed up these various elements of happiness in a representation of the fat Laughing Buddha, clutching his prayer beads in one hand and with a bag of gold in the other. The large number of children usually surrounding him illustrates another Chinese virtue - a large family consisting of many children.

    Moreover, there is belief, that the Laughing Buddha is in fact modeled on an historical figure, a fat wandering Zen monk named Pu Tai, who possibly claimed to be an incarnation of the future Buddha Maitreya (Chinese Mi-lo-fo; Japanese Miroku). One poem attributed to him reads:

    Mi-lo, true Mi-lo
    Reborn innumerable times
    From time to time manifested to men
    The men of the age do not recognize you
    More here ...

    http://www.newsfinder.org/site/more/...ughing_buddha/
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  16. #16
    I understand how you feel Kate, and I also understand how folk feel about misappropriated use of the Zen word. But in recent years I've come to see it this way; if curiosity about a garden statue or a loo seat cover or a little jade protection Buddha ignites an interest in Buddhism, if a small dharma seed is sown, that's a blessing.
    Same with the word Zen, although people may not understand what it really means, some of them might be curious enough to look a little bit deeper - they might even end up here at Treeleaf and that's wonderful.
    On a lighter note (and yes I do think there's a funny side to all of this) a while ago I bought a non slip mat for the shower, which I chose because it was white with a pretty design of bamboo leaves. Only when I got home did I notice the Z word amongst the leaves so now I'm reminded of my practice every time I step in the shower and that's not a bad thing!
    Gassho
    Meitou
    Satwithyoualltoday lah and had a Zen shower
    命 Mei - life
    島 Tou - island

  17. #17
    Wonderful! Thank you, Meitou.

    Gassho
    Kyōshin
    Satlah

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

  18. #18
    Hi,

    I don’t enjoy swimming upstream.

    Gasho, Jishin, _/st\_

  19. #19
    Member Getchi's Avatar
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    Thankyou Jundo for this teaching

    Since mind is king, no-one is our "master". Kind thoughts and fusses are both appropriate if inline with buddhist intention, i think?.

    And thankyou HoTei


    GAssho,
    Geoff.

    SatTOday
    LaH
    Nothing to do? Why not Sit?

  20. #20
    Treeleaf Unsui Geika's Avatar
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    I'm with Meitou, they are each little seeds that might plant something good.

    At the same time, even something considered offensive doesn't really bother me. But that's just me. I'd rather not suffer over it. There is a beer that is sold in glass bottles shaped like Buddha. Highly inappropriate concerning the precepts, but at the same time, a really cool looking bottle. My old roommate bought some and after we drank them we turned them into lamps.

    Gassho

    Sat today, lah
    求道芸化 Kyudo Geika
    I am just a priest-in-training, please do not take anything I say as a teaching.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Geika View Post
    There is a beer that is sold in glass bottles shaped like Buddha. Highly inappropriate concerning the precepts, but at the same time, a really cool looking bottle. My old roommate bought some and after we drank them we turned them into lamps.
    That’s awesome 😂 Any pics?

    Gassho,
    Jakuden
    SatToday/LAH

  22. #22
    Treeleaf Unsui Geika's Avatar
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    I wish I had pics, Jakuden, but that was a long time ago. Attached is a photo of the bottle. What we did was use paper clips to attach them to white Christmas lights. It was lovely, and after google searching the product I saw that a lot of people on Etsy have been doing stuff with them. It's called Lucky Buddha.

    Gassho

    Sat today, lah
    Attached Images Attached Images
    求道芸化 Kyudo Geika
    I am just a priest-in-training, please do not take anything I say as a teaching.

  23. #23

  24. #24
    On the other side of tiny Buddhas, there are giant Buddhas.

    According to Wikipedia, always reliable, in the town next to our home in Tsukuba, the "Ushiku Great Buddha" is 120 meters (394 feet) tall, including the 10m high base and 10m high lotus platform. Yes, there may now be a couple of bigger Buddhas other places in Asia, but we don't mention those guys here in the greater Tsukuba-Ushiku region of Ibaraki, Japan. I ask you formally as a member of Treeleaf to PAY NO ATTENTION to any challenger.



    The "little Buddha" on the right is the famous "Great Buddha" statue in Kamakura. Ours has an elevator and is fully air conditioned!

    (anyway, since when is Buddha a matter of big or small, tall or short?)



    One other fascinating fact about our Great Buddha in our next town ... someone thought to build an outlet mall nearby, that although in Japan,has all the usual stores like the Gap.

    And the Buddha presides over. If standing in just the right place, Great Buddha Blesses the Gap ... I do not make this up ...




    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLah
    Last edited by Jundo; 05-18-2019 at 12:03 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  25. #25
    Here in Vietnam (Da Nang), we have a giant statue too, affectionately known as "Lady Buddha." She's about 30 stories high and has a 2 meter tall seated Buddha on her hat. She's situated on a little peninsula overlooking the ocean. Very beautiful.

    Gassho
    Kyōshin
    Satlah

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk

  26. #26
    Now THAT is amazing! And the GAP story is hilarious!

    Sent from my Pixel using Tapatalk
    "Heaven is right where you are standing, and that is the place to train"-Ueshiba Morihei

  27. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by Meitou View Post
    I understand how you feel Kate, and I also understand how folk feel about misappropriated use of the Zen word. But in recent years I've come to see it this way; if curiosity about a garden statue or a loo seat cover or a little jade protection Buddha ignites an interest in Buddhism, if a small dharma seed is sown, that's a blessing.
    Same with the word Zen, although people may not understand what it really means, some of them might be curious enough to look a little bit deeper - they might even end up here at Treeleaf and that's wonderful.
    On a lighter note (and yes I do think there's a funny side to all of this) a while ago I bought a non slip mat for the shower, which I chose because it was white with a pretty design of bamboo leaves. Only when I got home did I notice the Z word amongst the leaves so now I'm reminded of my practice every time I step in the shower and that's not a bad thing!
    Gassho
    Meitou
    Satwithyoualltoday lah and had a Zen shower
    Yes, Meitou, such trifles, if I may say so, are like ... a "reminder" program on the phone; something like anchors

    Gassho,
    Oleg
    Sat today, Lend a Hand
    [Gassholook]:Будда:: TL:

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Kyoshin View Post
    Here in Vietnam (Da Nang), we have a giant statue too, affectionately known as "Lady Buddha." She's about 30 stories high and has a 2 meter tall seated Buddha on her hat. She's situated on a little peninsula overlooking the ocean. Very beautiful.
    With all due respect, your "Lady Buddha" (who actually is Kannon /Kwan Yin Bodhsattva, or i will eat my hat) is a mere 67meters.

    http://ladybuddha.org/

    https://www.pinterest.com/pin/508484...65886/?lp=true

    Our Ushiku Great Buddha comes in at 100m even without the base ...

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ushiku_Daibutsu

    That is to say, our Big Buddha could kick your Buddha's butt in a Dharma wrestling match.

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post

    That is to say, our Big Buddha could kick your Buddha's butt in a Dharma wrestling match.
    Maybe so, but ours is prettier.

    Gassho
    Kyōshin
    Satlah


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    Last edited by Kyoshin; 05-13-2019 at 08:46 AM.

  30. #30
    PS - Wiki (on whom we can always rely) and the Atlantic have our Ushiku Buddha as the world 5th Tallest statue, and the 3rd Tallest Buddha.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_tallest_statues

    https://www.theatlantic.com/photo/20...-world/574531/

    We were number one until 2008 ... and i contest some of the measurements of these other Buddha. Of course, size is not everything and, anyway, it all depends how one places the tape measure on the base. Teehee.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  31. #31
    I've somehow fallen into a wikipedia tall statue wormhole, how mindful!

    China and Japan are really going toe to toe on the tall statue front and then up pops India out of nowhere!

    Gassho,

    Neil

  32. #32
    Haha oh my goodness, I love this Sangha! Haha

    Gassho

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    "Heaven is right where you are standing, and that is the place to train"-Ueshiba Morihei

  33. #33
    Well, my dear Treeleaf, you again remind me of the importance of Sangha. It looks as though I am well in the minority and because your opinions matter to me, I am trying out a more relaxed view. I have even thought that perhaps I should get my hands on one of those tiny Buddhas to remind me to keep an open mind. But on the internet, there seem to be no end to these "Hear no evil, see no evil, speak no evil" Buddha sets, which heretofore, I've seen depicted only as monkeys--and I get angry all over again! So. . . I'm working on it.

    Gassho,
    Kate

    SAT/lah/laughed
    Kate

  34. #34
    My main thing is that I wish that Buddha statues weren't generally so expensive

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    "Heaven is right where you are standing, and that is the place to train"-Ueshiba Morihei

  35. #35
    I heard it was once said if you see the buddha outside of yourself kill him... i guess me a d sledge-o-matic should go to the mall.

    Sent from my SAMSUNG-SM-J727AZ using Tapatalk
    --Washu
    和 Harmony
    秀 Excellence

    "Trying to be happy by accumulating possessions is like trying to satisfy hunger by taping sandwiches all over your body" George Carlin Roshi

  36. #36
    Hi Kate,

    I know what you mean. Sometimes people do things that might be offensive to the hardcore Buddhist inside us, but the way I see it, that's just part of the experience. Being a Zen Buddhist is, among other things, to be relaxed when seeing how others relate to our practice. Buddhism has survived this long because it adapts to cultures and helps us to adapt to cultures and changes.

    Here in Mexico you can buy a Buddha statuette in markets, at witchcraft stands (very popular). Usually you can find a Buddha right next to the African deities, Santeria items, the Holy Death and Aztec gods.

    Can you spot the Buddha and Kanzeon here?

    proxy.duckduckgo.jpgproxy.duckduckgo1.jpg

    So I take it all lightly because people don't seem to care or do this on purpose.

    Gassho,

    Kyonin
    Sat/LAH
    Hondō Kyōnin
    奔道 協忍

  37. #37
    Tiny Buddha, a gift, travels with me and here is presiding over terror-inducing handwork, perhaps offering metta.

    IMG_1101.JPG

    Guanyin, two dollars from the local thrift, presides over shop. She has missing fingers, a constant reminder of what can happen.

    1-IMG_0907.jpg

    gassho
    doyu
    sat today
    特別な人ではない

  38. #38
    Member Getchi's Avatar
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    Please, do not argue amonsgt friends over the appearance of a temporal image!!!!

    Though humans appear short, or tall; in Buddha there is not short or tall, no best, no second and no competition.

    Simply because, as you can see, AUSTRALIA HAS LARGEST GEMSTONE BUDDHA STATUE IN WORLD!!!!

    http://https://www.stupa.org.au/jade-buddha-2/
    3802729214_7a3f6a6496.jpg 3802729214_7a3f6a6496.jpg


    And its JADE!!! extra points for bringing this thing back to OP's material of choice.


    One thought produced without clinging is Freedom itself.
    Last edited by Getchi; 05-14-2019 at 11:09 PM. Reason: Canine/Temporal anomoly while writing.
    Nothing to do? Why not Sit?

  39. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by Getchi View Post
    Please, do not argue amonsgt friends over the appearance of a temporal image!!!!

    Though humans appear short, or tall; in Buddha there is not short or tall, no best, no second and no competition.

    Simply because, as you can see, AUSTRALIA HAS LARGEST GEMSTONE BUDDHA STATUE IN WORLD!!!!

    http://https://www.stupa.org.au/jade-buddha-2/
    3802729214_7a3f6a6496.jpg 3802729214_7a3f6a6496.jpg


    And its JADE!!! extra points for bringing this thing back to OP's material of choice.



    Gassho, Shinshi

    SaT-LaH
    空道 心志 Kudo Shinshi
    I am just a priest-in-training, any resemblance between what I post and actual teachings is purely coincidental.

  40. #40
    Member bayamo's Avatar
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    I'm curious. Are they taped or glued down? How do they keep them from shifting all over the place with the movement of the car?
    thanks
    #sattoday
    Oh, yeah. If I didn't have inner peace, I'd go completely psycho on all you guys all the time.
    Carl Carlson

  41. #41
    Quote Originally Posted by bayamo View Post
    I'm curious. Are they taped or glued down? How do they keep them from shifting all over the place with the movement of the car?
    thanks
    #sattoday
    Sticky tape I would imagine! Glue would work, but only if you plan to sell the car some day to another Buddhist.

    By the way, just came across this online ...



    Gassho, J

    STLah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  42. #42
    Member bayamo's Avatar
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    I like that springy Buddha! Thanks!!

    Sent from my SM-G610M using Tapatalk
    Oh, yeah. If I didn't have inner peace, I'd go completely psycho on all you guys all the time.
    Carl Carlson

  43. #43
    Member bayamo's Avatar
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    Know what I'd like? Remember those "insta-mold" plastic tchotchkes you could get on the Florida Turnpike, made right before your eyes for a buck? You'd whine till your Pop broke down and gave you the coins... A insta-mold Buddha would be neat.

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    Oh, yeah. If I didn't have inner peace, I'd go completely psycho on all you guys all the time.
    Carl Carlson

  44. #44
    Quote Originally Posted by bayamo View Post
    Know what I'd like? Remember those "insta-mold" plastic tchotchkes you could get on the Florida Turnpike, made right before your eyes for a buck? You'd whine till your Pop broke down and gave you the coins... A insta-mold Buddha would be neat.
    Aha ....

    http://moldville.arcade-museum.com/03--hotei.html






    And that is when "a quarter" was "a buck!"

    Gassho, J

    STLah
    Last edited by Jundo; 05-17-2019 at 11:14 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  45. #45
    Member bayamo's Avatar
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    Thank you. From the bottom of my heart, thank you.

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    Carl Carlson

  46. #46
    Member bayamo's Avatar
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    I was hoping for the "sitting Siddhartha, Indian type" or even the "sitting fat Buddha" (pardon my ignorance, at the local bar and too lazy to Google the names), but I'd settle for that. But again, thank you!!!

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  47. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by bayamo View Post
    ... those "insta-mold" plastic tchotchkes you could get on the Florida Turnpike
    I did not know that "tchotchkes" was Portuguese!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tchotchke
    Last edited by Jundo; 05-17-2019 at 11:22 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  48. #48
    Member bayamo's Avatar
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    Well, I live in Brazil, but I'm American. That word I picked up from Mr. Maisel, my grandparents' neighbor. He observed the Sabbath and I was their "house goy" when I stayed over. That's what he'd call the little things I'd buy from those red vending machines at the supermarket.

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    Oh, yeah. If I didn't have inner peace, I'd go completely psycho on all you guys all the time.
    Carl Carlson

  49. #49
    Well... As far as appropriation of imagery, it's the same old same old everywhere. Imagine, someone like Madonna wearing a Catholic rosary as a fashion accessory! It's kind of silly. I'm not saying that to be judgmental with her, but I'm thinking of her behavior and what it represents in juxtaposition to the meaning of the thing around her neck. And, of course, all the Lucky Charms and whatnot that people have in their cars and all... On the one hand, I agree that it's just annoying to see Buddhist iconography used in such silly ways as making lucky charms out of sacred images, or fashion accessories out of Malas. (All for profit, of course...) On the other hand, it also makes it obvious that people have become increasingly comfortable with Buddhism here in the West, and that such images and whatnot are so common and prevalent that they're being taken for granted. As for the statues, I think any Buddhist Would agree that a Statue is just a statue. You can meditate in front of a beautiful statue, you can meditate in front of a broken light bulb. It's YOUR activity and non activity, your practice... not the object in front of you. As such, the statue is just a statue. It's not going to protect you. Not going to do anything but sit on the dashboard of a car, no matter where YOU happen to drive. Isn't that how it is with all our sacred images? just a statue... Just inanimate objects.
    It's where YOU take it that matters. You are the one driving.
    Of course, it's possible that such a statue sitting on someone's dashboard might actually cause them to be a little more mindful in the car ... And anything that keeps people's minds engaged in the activity at hand when they're hurtling down the road at 80 miles an hour in a 2000 pound weapon can only be a good thing...

    Gassho. Sat today.
    Ankai

  50. #50
    Member bayamo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by KvonNJ View Post
    Well... As far as appropriation of imagery, it's the same old same old everywhere. Imagine, someone like Madonna wearing a Catholic rosary as a fashion accessory! It's kind of silly. I'm not saying that to be judgmental with her, but I'm thinking of her behavior and what it represents in juxtaposition to the meaning of the thing around her neck. And, of course, all the Lucky Charms and whatnot that people have in their cars and all... On the one hand, I agree that it's just annoying to see Buddhist iconography used in such silly ways as making lucky charms out of sacred images, or fashion accessories out of Malas. (All for profit, of course...) On the other hand, it also makes it obvious that people have become increasingly comfortable with Buddhism here in the West, and that such images and whatnot are so common and prevalent that they're being taken for granted. As for the statues, I think any Buddhist Would agree that a Statue is just a statue. You can meditate in front of a beautiful statue, you can meditate in front of a broken light bulb. It's YOUR activity and non activity, your practice... not the object in front of you. As such, the statue is just a statue. It's not going to protect you. Not going to do anything but sit on the dashboard of a car, no matter where YOU happen to drive. Isn't that how it is with all our sacred images? just a statue... Just inanimate objects.
    It's where YOU take it that matters. You are the one driving.
    Of course, it's possible that such a statue sitting on someone's dashboard might actually cause them to be a little more mindful in the car ... And anything that keeps people's minds engaged in the activity at hand when they're hurtling down the road at 80 miles an hour in a 2000 pound weapon can only be a good thing...

    Gassho. Sat today.
    Ankai
    Madonna wore that rosary to fame... (yeah, with that I'm dating myself)

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    Oh, yeah. If I didn't have inner peace, I'd go completely psycho on all you guys all the time.
    Carl Carlson

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