Page 2 of 3 FirstFirst 123 LastLast
Results 51 to 100 of 125

Thread: A TREELEAF EXPERIMENT with EVERYONE’S PARTICIPATION REQUESTED: “LAH” (Lend A Hand)

  1. #51
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post

    Do you know that even the sick monk in the monastery hospice is not excused? If it is all he can do, his work becomes to stay in bed, take his medicine and to offer a kind word to those who nurse him.
    Yes, after I got the tip of my finger stitched back on, my work assignment the next day was "self care." I went up to their little cemetery, and swept and tidied while I was there.

    I will admit that I whined a bit to my Ango partner Zenmei during Ango about trying to find time and motivation to do helping deeds, when I already spent my day serving others. To my knowledge, he has kept his promise not to throw me under the bus about that . When I have had Dokusan/Daisan during Sesshin at ZMM, most of my questions surrounded this topic: help with defining "compassion fatigue," how to know when to do self-care vs. helping others, how does compassion originate and manifest... I felt and still feel the need for a teacher to guide me with this, but I am starting to understand that if "self-care" is what you need to do in order to benefit others, then self-care is your practice... if your day is spent helping others, then do it earnestly and perhaps a little better, more kindly and patiently, with awareness of the "sameness" of yourself and the others you are helping, and that is your practice.

    Gassho,
    Jakuden
    SatToday/LAH
    清 道 寂田
    SEIDO JAKUDEN
    I am a novice priest. Any resemblance my posts may have to actual teachings about the Dharma, living or dead, is purely coincidental (and just my attempt to be helpful).

  2. #52
    Quote Originally Posted by Jakuden View Post
    I felt and still feel the need for a teacher to guide me with this, but I am starting to understand that if "self-care" is what you need to do in order to benefit others, then self-care is your practice... if your day is spent helping others, then do it earnestly and perhaps a little better, more kindly and patiently, with awareness of the "sameness" of yourself and the others you are helping, and that is your practice.

    Gassho,
    Jakuden
    SatToday/LAH
    That is right. We try to stay "other directed" on this as best we can, but sometimes all we can manage is to nurse ourselves.

    And because so many folks are already doing so much for others, and have such busy days, all we ask is a second, a minute, a little touch extra, a drop more caring, one act more.

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  3. #53
    Is it me or is there sometimes a confusion between Treeleaf and Treeleaf Monastery? I feel quite happy as a lay Buddhist, accessing Treeleaf as a frequent visitor and practitioner. I try to participate and contribute where I can and I carry the sangha in my heart. I also meditate, clean floors, scrub toilets, cook and wash dishes (just not in a monastery). As Jundo says, ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE. I'm not trying to imitate a monastic experience.

    I'll join in the LAH experiment as an act of solidarity (and to avoid being viewed as the person who isn't cleaning the toilets...) but I do feel it's a shame that what could be a "way of being" is reduced to a daily good deed. I guess I need to be a little more humble and open-minded. I'm also aware others are keen to try it so I don't want to disrupt that.

    Deep bows,
    Enjaku
    Sat
    援若

  4. #54
    Quote Originally Posted by Enjaku View Post
    Is it me or is there sometimes a confusion between Treeleaf and Treeleaf Monastery? I feel quite happy as a lay Buddhist, accessing Treeleaf as a frequent visitor and practitioner. I try to participate and contribute where I can and I carry the sangha in my heart. I also meditate, clean floors, scrub toilets, cook and wash dishes (just not in a monastery). As Jundo says, ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE. I'm not trying to imitate a monastic experience.

    I'll join in the LAH experiment as an act of solidarity (and to avoid being viewed as the person who isn't cleaning the toilets...) but I do feel it's a shame that what could be a "way of being" is reduced to a daily good deed. I guess I need to be a little more humble and open-minded. I'm also aware others are keen to try it so I don't want to disrupt that.

    Deep bows,
    Enjaku
    Sat
    It's a "daily good deed" in the same sense that zazen is "staring at a wall". Yes, it's true on the surface, but there is a universe of depth behind it. We're not reducing kindness to a check mark on a list, we're saying that kindness to others is such a foundational part of our practice that in the same way we encourage sitting, we should encourage kind action. It's just as important to our practice, and it should be emphasized as our way of being.

    That's what it means to me, anyway. I hope we're not setting up a dichotomy of "if you don't do this, you're not pulling your weight", because no one should feel obligated if they choose not to. For me, I need the extra motivation. Some days the only thing that gets me on the cushion is my obligation to Treeleaf, and so far, this lah thing is providing the same push. If it doesn't feel that way to you, don't do it.

    Gassho, Zenmei
    #sat/lah

  5. #55
    Quote Originally Posted by Enjaku View Post
    Is it me or is there sometimes a confusion between Treeleaf and Treeleaf Monastery? I feel quite happy as a lay Buddhist, accessing Treeleaf as a frequent visitor and practitioner. I try to participate and contribute where I can and I carry the sangha in my heart. I also meditate, clean floors, scrub toilets, cook and wash dishes (just not in a monastery). As Jundo says, ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE. I'm not trying to imitate a monastic experience.

    I'll join in the LAH experiment as an act of solidarity (and to avoid being viewed as the person who isn't cleaning the toilets...) but I do feel it's a shame that what could be a "way of being" is reduced to a daily good deed. I guess I need to be a little more humble and open-minded. I'm also aware others are keen to try it so I don't want to disrupt that.

    Deep bows,
    Enjaku
    Sat
    As I spent time perusing the archives of Treeleaf, its history and mission, it always seemed clear to me that Jundo (and Taigu) were attempting to create an online Zen Monastery... but since that term implies a building, Sangha was more appropriate. Jundo has defended Treeleaf to critics by declaring that an online Sangha could indeed replicate the important aspects of a traditional sangha. I have never heard any indication that it was supposed to be "Zen lite" or "layperson easy Zen," although it is meant to be more easily accessible than a brick and mortar monastery. So if someone is not looking for a monastic experience, there will probably be confusion, because Treeleaf is a monastic experience--complete with teachers giving assignments to students, chanting,sitting, vows, samu, sewing, bell-ringing, and service to the Sangha and to ones own life.
    Gassho
    Jakuden
    SatToday/LAH



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    清 道 寂田
    SEIDO JAKUDEN
    I am a novice priest. Any resemblance my posts may have to actual teachings about the Dharma, living or dead, is purely coincidental (and just my attempt to be helpful).

  6. #56
    Jundo,
    I took on your advice from ages ago, and have done pro-bono work, very underpaid work (ie only costs covered, I broke even, essentially donation of labor time.) I've just signed up for another four full days over the next six weeks. Does this count as LAH? Or is it the idea of a little mindful gesture each and every day, when the opportunity presents itself?
    Tom
    Sat Today.
    Not sure if I've LAH.

  7. #57
    Quote Originally Posted by Tom View Post
    Jundo,
    I took on your advice from ages ago, and have done pro-bono work, very underpaid work (ie only costs covered, I broke even, essentially donation of labor time.) I've just signed up for another four full days over the next six weeks. Does this count as LAH? Or is it the idea of a little mindful gesture each and every day, when the opportunity presents itself?
    Tom
    Sat Today.
    Not sure if I've LAH.
    Hi Tom,

    Sure it is LAH! But even there, in that pro-bono work, take one moment or do one thing a little extra each day. Then it sure is LAH for sure!

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  8. #58
    Quote Originally Posted by Enjaku View Post
    Is it me or is there sometimes a confusion between Treeleaf and Treeleaf Monastery? I feel quite happy as a lay Buddhist, accessing Treeleaf as a frequent visitor and practitioner. I try to participate and contribute where I can and I carry the sangha in my heart. I also meditate, clean floors, scrub toilets, cook and wash dishes (just not in a monastery). As Jundo says, ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE. I'm not trying to imitate a monastic experience.

    I'll join in the LAH experiment as an act of solidarity (and to avoid being viewed as the person who isn't cleaning the toilets...) but I do feel it's a shame that what could be a "way of being" is reduced to a daily good deed. I guess I need to be a little more humble and open-minded. I'm also aware others are keen to try it so I don't want to disrupt that.

    Deep bows,
    Enjaku
    Sat
    Hi Enjaku,

    I have to disagree with Jakuden a bit. Treeleaf is not a monastery and was never intended as a monastery, as far as a place behind walls where folks do long term, concentrated residential training.

    But Treeleaf is a Community, a Sangha, as is any local Zen Center or group. And there, when people show up for a day's Zazen or a longer Retreat, someone makes the tea, someone puts out the cushions, someone scrubs the floors. Now, as in those places, this LAH is purely voluntary, there is no obligation or requirement at all. However, we are very happy to have members all join in together for the community effort of the work to do. This is part of our Training too.

    For example, here is a typical Soto Zen Center, not a monastery, and the community work is the center of Practice:

    http://www.meditation-zen.org/en/meditation-samu

    The request for "one good deed for a moment" is a minimum request (not even a requirement!). Please feel free to do many good deeds each day, there is no maximum either!

    To not say "LAH" is, as some have pointed out, a kind of humility, not wishing to show off or take credit. That is excellent. But there is also a kind of selfishness to it too, saying that one is so "humble" that one is not willing to encourage others simply by saying "I'm here too." I understand that people do not wish to brag about their good deeds (that is why we created a system asking for anonymity), but by putting "LAH" one encourages others by saying "we are all in this together, we are all sweeping together, we are all a Community." LAH declaring folks do not say anything about WHAT they did, they merely are communicating "I'm in this too."

    Okay, I will go back on what I said at the start, Jakuden was also somewhat right: This place is intended as a new kind of "monastery" in a way, in which our work and family life is our bell ringing and Samu, changing diapers a sacred ceremony, and cooking in the home kitchen is our version of Tenzo. Yes. But we do not have tea to make here, we do not have Treeleaf floors to clean. So, we are asking (no demands, no requirements) our Treeleaf members to do this ...

    ... to help Treeleaf, to help their towns, to help people in need, to help themselves.

    If someone does not want to help, or helps but does not wish to encourage other members by showing the "LAH," that is fine too. All are welcome to sit and participate here, doing what they can or wish, freely, without demand, following their own heart.

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    Last edited by Jundo; 05-21-2017 at 10:17 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  9. #59
    Quote Originally Posted by Jakuden View Post
    So if someone is not looking for a monastic experience, there will probably be confusion, because Treeleaf is a monastic experience--complete with teachers giving assignments to students, chanting,sitting, vows, samu, sewing, bell-ringing, and service to the Sangha and to ones own life.
    Gassho
    Jakuden
    SatToday/LAH
    It's true, I view my practice as being very different from living in a Monastery and I wouldn't choose to live in a Monastery. I see Treeleaf as my local Zen Group and I attend ceremonies and I visit and contribute when I can. I have to be honest, it felt pretty hurtful to see this described as "Zen Lite" and "easy Zen". I know you wouldn't have meant it to be hurtful and I appreciate your honesty.

    Let me also say that you've been one of the warmest and wisest people I've met on this forum and I'm grateful to have this opportunity to practice with you. If I've failed to be clear or sensitive in this thread or elsewhere, please forgive me.

    Quote Originally Posted by Zenmei View Post
    It's a "daily good deed" in the same sense that zazen is "staring at a wall". Yes, it's true on the surface, but there is a universe of depth behind it. We're not reducing kindness to a check mark on a list, we're saying that kindness to others is such a foundational part of our practice that in the same way we encourage sitting, we should encourage kind action. It's just as important to our practice, and it should be emphasized as our way of being.
    This is an interesting point and it helps me see past some of my initial reservations. Thank you for making this clear. I see now that LAH is a small thing but one that also emphasises the equal importance of daily action alongside daily sitting. I couldn't see the wood for the trees.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    To say "LAH" is, as some have pointed out, a kind of humility, not wishing to show off or take credit. That is excellent. But there is also a kind of selfishness to it too, saying that one is so "humble" that one is not willing to encourage others simply by saying "I'm here too."

    LAH putting folks do not say anything about WHAT they did, they merely are communicating "I'm in this too."
    Thank you Jundo. I've taken this on board. As with many things, I see now that I've been a little narrow-minded when I could have been curious and just given this a try.

    I'd like to bow out of this thread at this point. I've already said far too much and I fear I've not been as sensitive as I could have been. These discussions are not so easy sometimes but often the most valuable lessons are "between the lines".

    Gassho,
    Enjaku
    Sat
    援若

  10. #60
    Thanks Enjaku. Give it a try and, in a couple of months, we will reassess how the experiment has gone.

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  11. #61
    Quote Originally Posted by Enjaku View Post
    It's true, I view my practice as being very different from living in a Monastery and I wouldn't choose to live in a Monastery. I see Treeleaf as my local Zen Group and I attend ceremonies and I visit and contribute when I can. I have to be honest, it felt pretty hurtful to see this described as "Zen Lite" and "easy Zen". I know you wouldn't have meant it to be hurtful and I appreciate your honesty.

    Let me also say that you've been one of the warmest and wisest people I've met on this forum and I'm grateful to have this opportunity to practice with you. If I've failed to be clear or sensitive in this thread or elsewhere, please forgive me.



    This is an interesting point and it helps me see past some of my initial reservations. Thank you for making this clear. I see now that LAH is a small thing but one that also emphasises the equal importance of daily action alongside daily sitting. I couldn't see the wood for the trees.



    Thank you Jundo. I've taken this on board. As with many things, I see now that I've been a little narrow-minded when I could have been curious and just given this a try.

    I'd like to bow out of this thread at this point. I've already said far too much and I fear I've not been as sensitive as I could have been. These discussions are not so easy sometimes but often the most valuable lessons are "between the lines".

    Gassho,
    Enjaku
    Sat
    Sincere apologies Enjaku, I can see where my words could be hurtful. It was an unskillful way to try to make a point. As usual, we react to the things we see of ourselves in others, ( which is another Zen experience) so in seeing your reluctance I'm sure I was arguing with my own. Zenmei's reply above was closer to what I should have said.
    Gassho
    Jakuden
    SatToday


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    清 道 寂田
    SEIDO JAKUDEN
    I am a novice priest. Any resemblance my posts may have to actual teachings about the Dharma, living or dead, is purely coincidental (and just my attempt to be helpful).

  12. #62
    P.S. The above illustrates how IMHO yes, being less of an as****e may qualify some days! As a 50-year-old female, I have days where I want to bite everyone's head off from the get-go and on those days I consciously struggle, at work, home, and the grocery store, to not be crabby. It also makes me much more aware of the battles my fellow human beings are fighting that I do not see.

    Gassho,
    Jakuden
    SatToday and will try not to hurt anyone else's feelings.
    清 道 寂田
    SEIDO JAKUDEN
    I am a novice priest. Any resemblance my posts may have to actual teachings about the Dharma, living or dead, is purely coincidental (and just my attempt to be helpful).

  13. #63
    Been chewing on this. I think my reservation is based in Jundo’s description that LAH would be a special extra act or deed of some kind, that you dedicate to this "Lend A Hand" Project”. Many of us have chosen Treeleaf as our Sangha and place of practice because we live complicated lives or in isolated communities. Both diminish the opportunity to formally engage in charitable projects. This morning a friend of mine posted on FB one of those Thai Government videos that promote loving kindness in the community and within families. Taking the belief that we strive for loving kindness and compassion in our lives, we really only have to add one thing I draw from my years in emergency services, that of situational awareness. By adding the last factor to our daily lives we will see the person dropping their groceries or the old man struggling to carry out a simple task, the person in a wheelchair unable to negotiate rough ground. So I think compassion and loving kindness is not enough, but by adding situational awareness we will find and engage LAH opportunities at every turn in daily lives.
    Shozan

  14. #64

    A TREELEAF EXPERIMENT with EVERYONE’S PARTICIPATION REQUESTED: “LAH” (Lend A Hand)

    I have mixed feelings about this mostly because it feels like an added obligation. Something to check off the to do list and more pressure in my already busy life. I completely support compassionate giving and I do participate in it. I get motivated to do so when touched emotionally by someone or some situation. It comes from a place of love not obligation. I will sit with it for awhile and maybe I can find a way to channel the proper emotional motivation. Also, I don't give of myself everyday. There are days I have nothing to give, some days I am socially withdrawn and other days I am total jerk. The most I can do on those days is to mitigate the damage I cause to others. I applaud the effort of trying to bring this community together in away that encourages acts of compassion.


    sat2day

    Troy
    Last edited by Troy; 05-21-2017 at 05:30 PM.

  15. #65
    I have found, in my life, that I subconsciously do more to help out when I am spending more time being present. It is almost a side effect of a solid zazen practice for me. In fact I can tell that I need to practice more when I float through life taking, taking, taking while not giving back. So for me this experiment is an extension of our normal everyday practice.

    Gassho,
    Paul

    Sattoday/LAH

    Sent from my SM-G920P using Tapatalk

  16. #66

    A TREELEAF EXPERIMENT with EVERYONE’S PARTICIPATION REQUESTED: “LAH” (Lend A Hand)

    Quote Originally Posted by pdharness View Post
    I have found, in my life, that I subconsciously do more to help out when I am spending more time being present. It is almost a side effect of a solid zazen practice for me. In fact I can tell that I need to practice more when I float through life taking, taking, taking while not giving back. So for me this experiment is an extension of our normal everyday practice.

    Gassho,
    Paul

    Sattoday/LAH

    Sent from my SM-G920P using Tapatalk
    So true. Thank you for that.


    sat2day

    Troy
    Last edited by Troy; 05-21-2017 at 06:22 PM.

  17. #67
    P.S. The above illustrates how IMHO yes, being less of an as****e may qualify some days! As a 50-year-old female, I have days where I want to bite everyone's head off from the get-go and on those days I consciously struggle, at work, home, and the grocery store, to not be crabby. It also makes me much more aware of the battles my fellow human beings are fighting that I do not see.
    Would never have guessed that!! Thank you for sharing, Jakuden.

    ...that LAH would be a special extra act or deed of some kind, that you dedicate to this "Lend A Hand" Project”. ... we really only have to add one thing I draw from my years in emergency services, that of situational awareness. By adding the last factor to our daily lives we will see...
    This is what I'm experiencing, thank you Shozan.
    Had three situations this weekend where I simply saw a situation to help "naturally".
    No thought of Treeleaf, or being a good Buddhist. Just being myself with my eyes open on an non-ass...e day.

    It's the same difference as having a salad because it is healthy and one should eat more plants, or having a salad because it's delicious.
    Same result, but I prefer the second.

    Gassho
    Jika
    #sattoday
    治 Ji
    花 Ka

  18. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by Jika View Post
    It's the same difference as having a salad because it is healthy and one should eat more plants, or having a salad because it's delicious.
    Same result, but I prefer the second.
    Yes, this is true Jika. We are all eating and all may be doing kind things.

    But one way supports the group and communicates to others in the Community, "Well, we are all eating the salad together out of the same bowl." It is a good thing to support the Sangha by saying, "I am part of the team, and we are all helping. I support the others and they support me, and that is what Sangha is about." Doing something secretly might be very good works, but it does not encourage others so well in their efforts.

    We are not a monastery, but any Zen group is the same, for monks or lay folks. Notice that the monks all see each other washing the floors, which brings group energy! Look at how many of these activities are communal, visible, support all. Watch the floor cleaning at 2:00 mark.



    (By the way, the descriptionn of Zazen in the film is a bit over the top but, well, it s a film maker's dramatic touch)

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    Last edited by Jundo; 05-22-2017 at 10:57 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  19. #69
    I have to admit, when I first read this request I clenched a little. Sadly I am not a naturally generous person. Early on in life I learned to be self-reliant. As a consequence I assume others should be too. This means that I have trouble both accepting help as well as giving it (giving is easier but again it isn't instinctual).

    Many years ago my wife suggested that at supper each night we take a turn describing what we are grateful for that day. Some days it is easy but some days it is really hard to find something to be grateful for. The routine is a good reminder to find something in each day. That's how I see this LAH request too. Before I post I must consider whether I LAH or not. Maybe I shouldn't post if I haven't.

    Thank you Jundo. This exercise is a good practise for me.

    Gassho
    Warren
    Sat today and LAH to my wife who is recovering from surgery and an unfortunate infection that came as a result.

  20. #70
    Sitting for your wife, Warren.

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH

    PS - You can post without a LAH, but try to do some small LAH before posting! That answers the problem right there.
    Last edited by Jundo; 05-23-2017 at 02:50 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  21. #71
    Quote Originally Posted by awarren View Post
    I have to admit, when I first read this request I clenched a little. Sadly I am not a naturally generous person. Early on in life I learned to be self-reliant. As a consequence I assume others should be too. This means that I have trouble both accepting help as well as giving it (giving is easier but again it isn't instinctual).

    Many years ago my wife suggested that at supper each night we take a turn describing what we are grateful for that day. Some days it is easy but some days it is really hard to find something to be grateful for. The routine is a good reminder to find something in each day. That's how I see this LAH request too. Before I post I must consider whether I LAH or not. Maybe I shouldn't post if I haven't.

    Thank you Jundo. This exercise is a good practise for me.

    Gassho
    Warren
    Sat today and LAH to my wife who is recovering from surgery and an unfortunate infection that came as a result.
    Very sorry to hear about your wife, Warren. Wishing her a full recovery.
    I feel the same way, it doesn't come naturally to me. But it's a part of me that I have wanted to change for a while now. It's geologic, the change comes from slow, steady pressure over time, and I see this as a tool to apply that pressure.

    Gassho, Zenmei
    #sat/lah

  22. #72
    Hi All,

    Sending metta your way Warren, hoping for a good recovery for your wife.

    I so appreciate the generosity of those who have shared their thoughts about this LAH exercise. This is great practice! I mean aside from the “good deeds” themselves. This discussion -- thinking about service and how it fits into the moments of our day -- is so beneficial. The Buddha said to test everything and try it out for yourself, and that’s what’s happening right here. Figuring out what works for your life and your practice.

    Looking at what comes up in your mind and heart when the Teacher sets a task can be as important as the actual task. Working with what arises can be more work than doing the thing itself! I’m guessing we all have some mixed feelings for and against this new thing.

    Anyone who feels resistance... I say that’s great! Here, then, is something new to look at, to be with, and to puzzle out: where is that resistance coming from? Is there fear, defiance, feelings of overwhelm? Is there a wholesome reason to abstain from this practice, a benefit to your particular practice, a valid reason to draw a boundary line? After looking deeply, that resistance may fade. Or it may not fade at all, but may bring you to a clearer understanding of how service fits into your life and what’s important and essential to your practice now. And what’s not. This seems like a very good thing.

    Same for those who embraced LAH quickly... that’s something to look at too. We all benefit from looking at our motivations. From pleasing the teacher, to feeling good about ourselves, to atonement, to gratitude, to saving all sentient beings, to peer pressure, self-image, attaining merit, challenging oneself, or whatever; looking at your motivation to take on this experiment is bound to clarify and enhance your practice.

    We don’t all sit in the same posture in shikantaza. And yet... we do really, in a way. Some of us might benefit greatly from a daily bowing practice, while others might find themselves in hospital if they attempted it. We won’t all practice service to others in the same way. And yet, the truth is that there is no separation. When you act appropriately, when you care for and help yourself or someone else, you serve all. And in practicing appropriately, you do support the practice of all. I think it’s up to you to work out what’s appropriate in whatever situation you find yourself in. How you sit, how you serve, how you sign your post on Treeleaf, it’s all practice and the teacher can guide and point, but your practice will take its shape from your own hands and heart.

    I think Lorax goes to the center of it when he points to situational awareness. Increasing this awareness can only bring benefit for all; there is really no downside to it.

    And what Jika says about helping “naturally,” yes, this is the real thing: the natural and instinctive move to do the right thing in the right place and the right time. I think, if practice has goals, that must certainly be one of them: to train and learn so that when the moment comes, one responds appropriately, wholesomely, with no need to embrace or resist -- just flowing in the moment.

    I think this LAH exercise brings us closer to that, even just in the thinking and sharing about it. (The fact that actual good deeds will be done, regardless, is pretty awesome too.) Whether you find yourself signing on for LAH, or deciding not to, any way you go, it’s a win if you go with a not-knowing mind and an earnest and open heart. As I see it, there’s benefit either way. A refining of clarity and intention. Wonderful!

    For the record I fully expect to fail at this experiment, as I do with each and every one of my vows. And so it goes. Vow and repent, and just keep walking, checking the compass, and doing the best I can on any given day.

    Gassho
    Byōkan
    sat today & lent a hand too
    Last edited by Byokan; 05-22-2017 at 09:07 PM.

  23. #73
    Quote Originally Posted by awarren View Post
    Sat today and LAH to my wife who is recovering from surgery and an unfortunate infection that came as a result.
    I am sorry to hear about your wife, sending much metta and hope she feels better soon.

    Also, I know what you mean ... I too find it hard to receive help, as I too had to be self-reliant. However I actually found the more I start giving and sharing with others, the more I found it easier to receive from others. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    SatToday/LAH
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

  24. #74
    Bingo Byokan!! Anyone who doesn't learn something about themselves from their reaction to this assignment isn't looking hard enough :-)

    Warren, I hope your wife is on the mend, is she doing any better? Sending Metta.

    Gassho,
    Jakuden
    SatToday
    清 道 寂田
    SEIDO JAKUDEN
    I am a novice priest. Any resemblance my posts may have to actual teachings about the Dharma, living or dead, is purely coincidental (and just my attempt to be helpful).

  25. #75
    Quote Originally Posted by Jakuden View Post
    Warren, I hope your wife is on the mend, is she doing any better? Sending Metta.

    Gassho,
    Jakuden
    SatToday
    Thank you all for your kind thoughts. Yes she is improving. Surgery is scary enough but then to end up back in the hospital to deal with the infection made it worse. Fortunately there are great health care professionals. She is back home now and taking it easy.

    Gassho
    Warren
    Sat today and LAH

  26. #76
    Hi all,

    I think it's natural to find resistance to our little LAH experiment. But in my experience and to agree with Byokan, we also must be aware where is this resistance coming from. Are we really resisting to just add 3 letters to a signature? Aren't we missing the point of doing a community effort to just be kind to others?

    To me this is not to brag or to point finges to others. It's about practicing together as a sangha and feel we are in the team. In a brick and mortar sangha where people meet under the same roof you don't need anything but to just show up to the event. And even then people tend to wear same t-shirts or hats to show their support to the cause.

    We don't have that because Treeleaf traded the buildings for an online space. So the equivalent thing to wear the same t-shirt is to just ad LAH to our signatures.

    Or each of us could go and get a dark green t-shirt and post a photo to support the activity.

    I guess adding LAH is cheaper and faster!

    So we together help sentient beings next to us. We make someone smile or donate to a charity. We together do a little effort to be kind. I know we already do because that's part of our Four Vows, but LAH is just a reminder that we are Treeleaf and we don't need no stinking buildings to be a beautiful sangha that practices compassion. We are together in this and we lend a hand to all who need it.

    Gassho,

    Kyonin
    Sat/LAH
    Hondō Kyōnin
    奔道 協忍

  27. #77
    Warren I hope your wife is feeling better.

    So I'm confused; you mean to say that we actually have to sit before we can post that we sat for the day? I kid, I kid

    This is a great idea; with all the crazy in the world, this is a great antidote.

    Gassho

    Risho
    -sattoday

  28. #78
    This is great.

    Daijo

    sat today

  29. #79
    After some thought I want to participate. I think my initial reaction was from feeling overwhelmed because I am still working on getting back to a daily meditation practice and participate more. An extra thing felt like a lot. But on reflection doable.


    sat2day

    Troy

  30. #80
    Quote Originally Posted by Troy View Post
    After some thought I want to participate. I think my initial reaction was from feeling overwhelmed because I am still working on getting back to a daily meditation practice and participate more. An extra thing felt like a lot. But on reflection doable.


    sat2day

    Troy
    Good to hear Troy....welcome aboard the LAH train. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    SatToday/LAH
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

  31. #81
    I think this is a fantastic idea.

    Gassho,

    Jakugan

    Sat today/ lah

  32. #82
    Quote Originally Posted by Shingen View Post
    Good to hear Troy....welcome aboard the LAH train. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    SatToday/LAH



    sat2day

    Troy

  33. #83
    Quote Originally Posted by Shingen View Post
    ....welcome aboard the LAH train. =)


    (why the cat? Very Zen.)

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    Last edited by Jundo; 05-25-2017 at 12:17 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  34. #84
    Hello everyone
    Very good project! I want to join everyone in this. Thank You very much for this beatiful project, Jundo.
    I am grateful for sharing this practice with all of You.
    Gassho, Gokai
    Sattoday

  35. #85
    Thanks Jundo,
    What a wonderful group practice idea. I'm in.
    Being disabled and homebound, doing lend a hand (LAH) daily may take some creative thinking on my part.
    I will do what I can. I look forward to the practice. I need to get back into the swing of things. This practice will help me regain my focus.
    Gassho,
    Theophan
    Sat Today

  36. #86
    Quote Originally Posted by Theophan View Post
    Thanks Jundo,
    What a wonderful group practice idea. I'm in.
    Being disabled and homebound, doing lend a hand (LAH) daily may take some creative thinking on my part.
    I will do what I can. I look forward to the practice. I need to get back into the swing of things. This practice will help me regain my focus.
    Gassho,
    Theophan
    Sat Today
    "Do what I can" is all that it takes, and there is always something big or small that can be done!

    Found this on line, not much idea about it ...



    (Apparently, it is written for a group in Boston, the "Lend a Hand" Society, who help poor inner-city families fund decent housing ...

    http://www.lend-a-hand-society.org/

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  37. #87
    Oh, apparently it is a quote by American author, historian, Unitarian minister and philanthropist Edward Everett Hale (granted, some of his ways of putting things below are rather 19th Century ... but he meant well ... )

    Five years out of Harvard, after several successful interim ministries Hale settled as pastor of the Unitarian church in Worcester, MA. The congregation was close enough to Boston by train for him to keep in touch with his family, and open to their minister being a social advocate, in this case, for the Irish emigrants who arrived in Worcester fleeing from the potato famine.

    Edward Hale quickly took up the cause of refugee relief, both the immediate relief of charity, and the further relief of finding opportunities for the refugees to find work and flourish in their new homeland. Hale combined his activism for the Irish with his activism for emancipation by founding the New England Emigrant Aid Society to help fund emigrants willing to move into the new Western states and keep them free states. In Worcester he organized a group that settled in what became Lawrence, Kansas. The support from the Emigrant Aid Society was crucial because the new settlers met with much violence from southerners opposed to a new free state. ...

    Edward Hale had long been an activist for emancipation as well as for the education of freed slaves. Unlike many abolitionists and emancipationists, who wanted freedom for blacks but still considered them inferior intellectually, Edward Hale contended that blacks had an “equal capacity for learning as whites.” ...

    ... Perhaps the most lasting achievement of Hale’s life was the result of a magazine he published for five years called Old and New. Among its first serials was one by Hale, titled Ten Times One is Ten. Based on the life of a dear friend from Hale’s Worcester days, Edward Greenleaf, it tells the story of mourners meeting at the funeral of a friend and each relating how the man had changed their lives. They decide to form a club in his memory with the motto: “Look up and not down. Look forward and not back. Look out and not in. Lend a hand.” ...

    ... Eventually the clubs came to be known as Lend a Hand Clubs and by 1886, Edward Hale was editing a new monthly journal, Lend A Hand: A Record of Progress, which reported the activities of the clubs and also included articles on social issues of the day, such as Indian Rights. Although the Lend A Hand Clubs are no longer, the Lend A Hand Society in Boston has served as a nonsectarian benevolent organization which each month for over 100 years has lent a hand by giving out small but crucial grants to those facing financial crises, as well as giving out grants for camperships for Boston youth and book grants to institutions throughout the country. Lend A Hand is funded by an endowment and from gifts from the public


    And Theophan, kinda looks like you with them 19th Century whiskers!

    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  38. #88
    I spent yesterday afternoon with my volunteer job and with my mental health support group NAMI the National Alliance on Mental Illness NAMI Connection helping those liked myself fully myself with sever mental illnesses mine fully recovered according to my providers in psychological AND psychiatric professionals.

    Tai Shi
    LAH
    std
    Gassho

    Sent from my SM-T113 using Tapatalk
    "As the Buddha designed it, the Sangha's responsibility is to keep their vows, learn and practice the Dharma, and teach and guide the lay people. The lay people in turn, provide the requisites for life..." So are not the lay people the Sangha? Thubten Chodron.

  39. #89
    Hi Jundo and All, Tai Shi here and in an unusual mode, I am looking for helpful words, an you might know that as a 65-old-male very happily married to the love of my life, still I follow the words of Jakuden very closely, and I like so much about what she says with openness and candor; I wonder if I might have limits to money and always allowing my own helping nature to come forward. Truly I am a helping man, and this I have been told by the best of therapists. And yet, I find myself coming to an end of giving sometimes, and money which I send to only one charity enough, and having to put limits on taking friends. What do you think?
    Tai Shi Helped today,
    sat to day
    Gassho
    "As the Buddha designed it, the Sangha's responsibility is to keep their vows, learn and practice the Dharma, and teach and guide the lay people. The lay people in turn, provide the requisites for life..." So are not the lay people the Sangha? Thubten Chodron.

  40. #90
    Intent is of utmost importance. It is priceless.

    Gasho, Jishin, _/st\_

  41. #91
    Hi Taishi,

    One does what one can, which may change with time and each day.

    Gassho, Jundo

    SatTodayLAH
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  42. #92
    Quote Originally Posted by Jishin View Post
    Intent is of utmost importance. It is priceless.

    Gasho, Jishin, _/st\_
    Very true ... Intention is very important. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    SatToday/LAH
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

  43. #93
    Hi Everyone,


    I really like this idea and I have been doing this since my early 20's when I started to get maturity in meditation. Haha, not sure whether the wording is right here. I remember helping a fellow friend of mine to finish her project while I didn't even finished mine. Our state of mind reflects our Zazen and I believe that kindness is spontaneous and an aspect of our true nature. I also see what Jundo is saying though. Harmonious actions lead to a harmonious mind. Everything is linked.

    Gassho,
    Geerish
    SatToday.

  44. #94
    Hi guys.

    Saturday here at home we helped a couple of lost dogs get back home. Their families were happy, but the puppies were ecstatic to be reunited with their families.

    Watching puppies lose it with happiness and get all excited, warms the heart and makes us know we are doing small things for all sentient beings.

    Gassho,

    Kyonin
    Sat/LAH
    Hondō Kyōnin
    奔道 協忍

  45. #95
    Count me in.

    Daizan

    Sat Today/ LAH
    Last edited by RichardH; 05-29-2017 at 10:21 PM.

  46. #96
    I dropped off a few articles at the Good Will. I told the lady that works at the receiving door how nice he hair looked and got a big thank you and even bigger smile in return.

    Gassho

    Sat/LAH
    仁道 生開 - Jindo Shokai "Open to life in a benevolent way"
    May we all grow together in our knowledge of the Dharma

  47. #97
    Count me in. Will report via the anonymous email link as appropriate.

    ST/LAH

    Kyousui - strong waters 強 水

  48. #98
    Hello Dear Sangha,
    greetings from Alek, at the Warrap County, in the Northern part of South Sudan, where I'm in humanitarian mission supporting malnutrition programs here to cope with the pre-famine situation in this region.
    I'm of course in, in this project.
    Lending a hand every day to this people in need in this complicated context, as I did in my last mission in Somalia... and before there in Yemen... and before there in Sierra Leone (during the Ebola crisis) ... and ...
    Thanks a lot for your support in my life...
    Miguel
    Sat today/LAH

  49. #99
    Treeleaf Unsui Shugen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Redding California USA
    Hello Miguel,

    Thank you for taking the time to let us know how you are doing.

    Keep fighting the good fight!

    Deep bows,

    Shugen

    Sattoday/LAH


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Meido Shugen
    明道 修眼

  50. #100
    Quote Originally Posted by MikeTango View Post
    Hello Dear Sangha,
    greetings from Alek, at the Warrap County, in the Northern part of South Sudan, where I'm in humanitarian mission supporting malnutrition programs here to cope with the pre-famine situation in this region.
    I'm of course in, in this project.
    Lending a hand every day to this people in need in this complicated context, as I did in my last mission in Somalia... and before there in Yemen... and before there in Sierra Leone (during the Ebola crisis) ... and ...
    Thanks a lot for your support in my life...
    Miguel
    Sat today/LAH
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •