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Thread: trying to quit smoking, all and any advice welcome

  1. #1

    trying to quit smoking, all and any advice welcome

    the title says it all....i am trying to quit cold turkey, but ive tried a million times before...the thing is, besides getting winded walking up the stairs to my apt., i want to start running soon....i tried last night, or early this morning to be precise, and let myself down again this afternoon, after waking up at 1, basically a 12 hour nap, and called and bummed a fiver for a cheap pack of cigarettes...

    I want to beat this addiction!!!

    Gassho,

    Richard

    s@ 2day

  2. #2

  3. #3
    Jishin, thanks for the link. I actually have what is purportedly the number one cold turkey site on the net bookmarked on my tablet. I am seeking advice in a more personal manner, however, and advice especially from anyone here who may have beaten this habit successfully.

    Gassho

    Richard

    s@ 2day

  4. #4
    Hi Richard,

    Needs vs wants. Smoking is optional. If you don't light up, you don't smoke. That simple.

    It's only complicated if it's complicated. No need to complicate. Just say no. Don't light up, no problem.

    Gasho, Jishin, _/st\_

  5. #5
    Only method that ever worked for me was 'cold turkey'
    Throw whatever smokes you got in the trash if you want to smoke tell yourself,"if I still want to smoke in ten minutes I'll go buy a new pack. Garanteed, in ten minutes you won't even think of it.

    good luck with that
    gassho,

    satToday
    仁道 生開 - Jindo Shokai "Open to life in a benevolent way"
    May we all grow together in our knowledge of the Dharma

  6. #6
    Very helpful advice. I am trying to quit, too, on a reduction method. Every day, I extend the time between each cigarette, and each day it gets easier because I become used to less nicotine. I find that simply not thinking about it is also really helpful. Also, since I am smoking less, I actually like it less, because my tolerance is going dn. I can only handle a couple of drags before it's too much.

    Good luck!

    Gassho, sat today
    求道芸化 Kyudo Geika
    I am just a priest-in-training, please do not take anything I say as a teaching.

  7. #7
    Hi Richard, and anyone else struggling with smoking.
    Maybe this would help?
    https://www.ted.com/talks/judson_bre...ak_a_bad_habit

    Gassho,
    Seido
    SatToday
    The strength and beneficence of the soft and yielding.
    Water achieves clarity through stillness.

  8. #8
    I would add ... just don't buy them, just don't hunt through ashtrays for butts (been there) or in the sofa ... if finding one, just don't put it to your lips.

    Changing scene for a couple of days can help too ... maybe someplace clean and natural, like the mountains in a cabin (about 100 miles from the nearest cigarette machine! )

    If finding oneself in a craving attack ... SHIKANTAZA! No need to cross the legs, but find that inner place. Chances are that, if you wait 20 minutes in such equanimity, the craving attack will pass. Repeat and repeat as needed. Really, Shikantaza helped me quit smoking 30 years ago.

    First two days are hardest, then it starts to lessen. First two days will have many strong cravings, first week will have sometime strong cravings. Then, the body cleans out and it is easier ...

    .... but never totally. Even a year later, after a good meal or the like, WHAM ... CRAVING! Just repeat. Don't stick the darn thing in your lips. NOT EVEN "JUST ONE!" ZERO TOLERANCE!

    Oh, and patches.

    Do everything folks above recommend too.

    Gassho, Jundo

    SatToday
    Last edited by Jundo; 01-01-2017 at 03:45 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  9. #9
    Member FaithMoon's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Southern California
    ou might consider going on a 10-day Goenka retreat (they call it a "course") https://www.dhamma.org/en-US/index. It's not zen, and they can be a little obnoxious with their claims, but the meditation technique they teach is very good for cravings, you will not have any opportunity to smoke, and if you are a new student the retreat is free (unless that's changed). There are centers all over the US and the world.

    Faith-Moon
    st

  10. #10
    I ditto that, an amazing experience and a great way to rid yourself of any addictions and learn a very useful meditation technique....Frankly, it saved my life.

    Gassho,
    Marina
    sat today
    柔 Jyū flexible
    活 Katsu energetic

  11. #11
    So I'm in the process of smoking my "last" smoke, a cigar actually, I parenthesize last, because I've said this it so many times. Thank you all for your feedback, advice, metta, and links...I am going to try and sit for a whole half hour (interesting phrase!)...I tried to be mindful of unwrapping the plastic, and it so happens I got in the mail today a audio book (from a giveaway on goodreads)on breathing that touches on mindfulness, or so I've gotten from reading the back...so, ramble coming to an end, I'm going to try unwrapping THAT, in the morning, when I'm REALLY going to be tempted to give in to nicotine...

    Gassho, metta, all

    Richard

    s@ 2day

  12. #12
    Hi Richard, well you can see from the responses that you are not alone. So many of us have walked the path you are attempting and we have succeeded. I have two thoughts having been there and smoke free for over forty years. First on how to stop. Jundo offered one of he most effective pieces if advice. Take a break and go somewhere there are no cigarettes available when the urge gets overwhelming. The big thing is to get rid of all the cigarettes, the butts, everything. You can do it, but the only way really is just STOP. We are here sitting with you each day.

    The second issue is getting out and running. I ran for years, mostly trail runs, but also competitive distance runs. A few years ago I came down with pneumonia and was in the hospital for months. When I recovered I found I could no longer run. My physician assistant found the following site for beginners and starting over runners and it was great. Ran a 5K with my daughter and grand daughter a couple of years ago at 75 (just realized, I am 77 in a couple of weeks!) and still running and distance walking each day. Take is slow, but be committed.... http://www.coolrunning.com/engine/2/2_3/181.shtml

    SAT TODAY
    Last edited by lorax; 12-31-2016 at 03:04 AM.
    Shozan

  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by FaithMoon View Post
    ou might consider going on a 10-day Goenka retreat (they call it a "course") https://www.dhamma.org/en-US/index. It's not zen, and they can be a little obnoxious with their claims, but the meditation technique they teach is very good for cravings, you will not have any opportunity to smoke, and if you are a new student the retreat is free (unless that's changed). There are centers all over the US and the world.

    Faith-Moon
    st
    Really any three day or more Zen or other Buddhist Retreat will get one over the initial hump.

    Just make sure there are no smokers there, and it is a truly smoke free environment. My experience in Japan at a formal retreat at a famous Zen monastery was a bit bumpier. All went well the first day, until I found where the "bad" young monks hung out at night in the cemetery, and that I could bum a cigarette from one who kept his lighter in his long sleeves. Then, I found out they had a cigarette machine in the monastery in the guest building! That was the end of that! Smoking is just not a Precept thing in much of Asia (I understand that many many South Asian monks smoke like chimneys).

    http://www.dhammawheel.com/viewtopic.php?t=20222

    Anyway, the quitting took for good shortly thereafter. Highly recommended. After awhile, I did not miss them at all, made all the difference in the world ... no more hacking coughs in the morning, no more tobacco smell ...

    Gassho, J

    SatToday
    Last edited by Jundo; 01-01-2017 at 03:39 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  14. #14
    I had to keep quitting until I quit. It took a long time, but I did it. You haven't quit until you NEVER smoke another cigarette again. You got this.

    Gassho

    Sat Today

  15. #15

  16. #16
    Eishuu
    Guest
    I quit cold turkey 16 years ago. But before that I had been trying to stop for about 5 years, and had lost track of the number of packets of tobacco I had thrown away only to go out and buy some more a few hours later.

    What really helped me in the end was a change in lifestyle - it coincided with changing jobs so I wasn't around other smokers, also moved into a non-smoking Buddhist community and stopped drinking alcohol and didn't go to pubs. Maybe a bit extreme, but I would say anything you can change in your lifestyle that supports you giving up smoking will help. Not being around other smokers for a bit really helped me - anything that is likely to trigger the habit. Also at the time I started practising the Mindfulness of Breathing, and being more aware of my breath made me not want to pollute it. Yoga is good for that too. I'm sure Zazen will be really supportive as will the running that you want to do. Getting out of your normal routine even temporarily can help to form new habits and change old ones, so a retreat sounds like a great idea.

    Good luck - you can do this!

    Gassho
    Lucy
    Sat today

  17. #17
    You've got plenty of good advice but ultimately, it's all about making your choice, to smoke or not to smoke. There are no exercises or retreats in the world that will help you if you haven't made up your mind. We both know that there is always an excuse to take a smoke if you really want one.

    For me it was not that tough to overcome my addiction to nicotine, rather it was the habit, the ritual that presented the biggest obstacle. In the beginning I did not think on anything other than smoking. But it gets better and better. So my advice is to occupy yourself with something, especially now at the beginning of your journey. Idle hands are Maras workshop...

    Sat today

  18. #18
    When the desire for smoking is intense, some deep breathing can help. Counting to ten for the in breath, holding the breath, counting to ten on the out breath. The cravings will gradually space out. Good luck.

    Gassho,
    Onkai
    SatToday

  19. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Onkai View Post
    When the desire for smoking is intense, some deep breathing can help. Counting to ten for the in breath, holding the breath, counting to ten on the out breath. The cravings will gradually space out. Good luck.

    Gassho,
    Onkai
    SatToday
    Maybe the TreeLeaf phone app could help? Its full of wisdom and breathing. You could turn to it instead of a smoke.

    Gassho,
    Seido
    SatToday
    The strength and beneficence of the soft and yielding.
    Water achieves clarity through stillness.

  20. #20

    I want to beat this addiction!!!

    y
    Hello,

    Try non-commercial, i.e. roll your own. You'll not be able to inhale *cough*, satisfies the oral fix.

    Gets tiresome REAL quick = no fix.

    Commercial cigarette manufacturers admitted, to the U.S. Congress their tobacco mixture is adulterated (hastening addiction).

    Bon chance mon amí.


    Gassho
    Myosha
    sat today
    "Recognize suffering, remove suffering." - Shakyamuni Buddha when asked, "Uhm . . .what?"

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Myosha View Post
    Hello,

    Try non-commercial, i.e. roll your own. You'll not be able to inhale *cough*, satisfies the oral fix.

    Gets tiresome REAL quick = no fix.
    Yes. Just leave out the tobacco. And the paper. Matches too.

    In fact, just suck on a pencil.

    Gassho, J

    SatToday
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  22. #22
    I found quitting to be extremely difficult. In addition to using it to cope with stress, I became very addicted to the nicotine. I started by reducing the places I would smoke, first stopped smoking in my home or inside other people's homes, and then my car. Then I reduced the amount of cigs, getting down to half of one a day prior to stopping. I used Nicotine gum when I quit for about 6 months, then kept it on hand for emergencies for another 3 months in case I felt tempted. I also abstained from alcohol for a year and cut my caffeine down to 2 cups of tea a day. I've been a non-smoker for 8 years now, and I'll never go back. Good luck!

    Gassho,
    Rae
    Last edited by Rae7Mac; 01-06-2017 at 01:53 AM.

  23. #23
    Hello,

    it's so great that you want to stop this addiction. I am lucky that I never smoked a cigarette in my life, but I would like to help you, too. Smoking is what you could call a "bad habit" and nowadays it's all about habits. If you have the habit to smoke when you are stressed, maybe just go for a walk instead or just stand outside. If you want to look further on forming habits for a better health I highly recommend you "Master the day" by Alexander Heyne. This book helped me change my perspective on stuff like eating sweets.

    Gassho, Max
    #s@today

  24. #24
    Quote Originally Posted by Aurkihnowe View Post
    the title says it all....i am trying to quit cold turkey, but ive tried a million times before...the thing is, besides getting winded walking up the stairs to my apt., i want to start running soon....i tried last night, or early this morning to be precise, and let myself down again this afternoon, after waking up at 1, basically a 12 hour nap, and called and bummed a fiver for a cheap pack of cigarettes...

    I want to beat this addiction!!!

    Gassho,

    Richard

    s@ 2day
    Enlist the help of a substance abuse counselor. I used one for beating coffee addiction. No addiction is trivial.
    Thanks,
    Kaishin (Open Heart aka Matt)
    Please take this layman's words with a grain of salt.

  25. #25
    39 years tobacco free... The experience of quitting was so difficult that occasionally I still dream I've started smoking and panic because it just means I'll have to go through withdrawal again. Cold turkey for me, and it was a good year before the craving left. My boyfriend (who smoked too) at the time bet me $5 that I couldn't last until Christmas. That got me through the first 2 months. No way was he going to win that bet. Once I had 2 months under my belt I just could not go back.
    Its different for us all though. My sister in law quit a 40 year 3 pack a day habit once and said it was no problem. She did begin again after 3 years tobacco free but sadly is now dying of lung cancer. Cigarettes do that.

    They say nicotine is one of the most powerful addictive substances we can consume. I believe it.
    good luck !

    Anne
    ~st~

  26. #26
    Hi Richard!

    I went "cold turkey" on tobacco, too. I was heavily dependant on cigarettes for 17 years. At that time, I was on a religion which used Ayahuasca as a substance to promote inner knowledge. This religion is called UDV ("União do Vegetal") here in Brasil.

    I've tried to stop many times before... but I don't guess I really wanted to quit.

    Well, there comes a day when I had a dream with the UDV founder, mestre Gabriel (he were deceased since 1975). We were on a white room and he just shake hands and staring firmly into my eyes he asked if I really wanted to quit smoking. I replied that yes, and he said he would help me.

    I don't know if it was all a kind of "personalization" of thoughts, fantasy or not, my anxiety reduced a lot and I just stopped.

    Hope you can free yourself, too. It may sound cliché but sometimes I think that we have to learn to want. When we really want something... (some say) universe conspires in our favour.

    Don't be clinged or addicted to nothing.

    Gassho

    Marcos

    #SatToday
    Last edited by Kyosei; 01-09-2017 at 02:30 PM.
    _/|\_

    Kyōsei

    強 Kyō
    声 Sei

    Namu kie Butsu, Namu kie Ho, Namu kie So.

  27. #27
    Greetings!

    I wasn’t a smoker for very long (about a year), but I was a smoker during my "formative" college days, and for a little while after (during a first and very troublesome marriage). I also quit cold turkey, and I found that quitting wasn't the hard part.....I quit MANY times.... ....it was "staying quit" that was the problem! Some people can just walk away from things like that, and some can't. There's no real "one size fits all" response, but I agree with a couple of the posts above: shikantaza, taking a walk/doing another behavior, and betting someone you can't go a week or so all would work pretty well. The real key is to see if you can figure out the root of your smoking behavior/pattern and eliminating that.

    I recently found that I have been addicted to work for the last 5+ years. I've done a lot of talking with therapists about breaking addiction and have read a number of books on the subject. In looking at my patterns and behaviors, I found it quite easy to move away from my addictive behavior (i.e., change up work location, break old patterns such as getting a cup of coffee before working late, etc.). Take a look at when you find yourself smoking and what your patterns are. Then look at those from the Zen angle: why do you do those actions (mindfulness!!)? Once you know what the patterns and behaviors are, you can control them much better, because you see them for what they are. When you find yourself wanting to smoke, ask yourself, "Do I really want to smoke, or am I just blindly following a pattern?" If your answer is that you are just reacting to a pattern, then you can more easily recognize the behavior and substitute something else.

    For example, suppose that you find that you smoke most when you are nervous. The next time you are nervous, recognize your nervousness, and ask yourself if your craving is a reaction to the nervousness. If it is, then smile at yourself for noticing both your nervousness and your craving. Acknowledge your craving (I like to think of doing this literally....say to yourself, "I see you, craving, my friend. I'm just not going to interact with you"), and move on.

    This helps with a couple of things: mindfulness, beating your cravings/addiction, and even helping with the ultimate causes of other potentially harmful things in your life (such as the nervousness or stress that may be causing your cravings).

    It also helps if you don't have cigarettes on hand with you or easily accessible. Can't smoke what you don't have!

    If all else fails, just keep telling yourself, "I won't smoke today, but I'll let myself smoke tomorrow." Say this every day....tomorrow is always tomorrow.

    One last thing. If are trying to quit and just can't, *don't* get down on yourself or beat yourself up. Quitting smoking or any other addictive behavior is very difficult, and may require other means (patches, gum, etc.). It is not weakness to use those, if they can help!

    Gassho and good luck --

    --JimH (SatToday!)

  28. #28
    Hi
    I just quit smoking in October of 2016. I have been smoking cigarettes, pipes (including herbs other than tobacco), and cigars since I was 17 years old. I am now 63. There was a 10 year period when I did quit smoking about 20 years ago, but because I met some old buddies and we went to the pub and had a few.....and back to the old nicotine I went. So, once you do succeed in quitting, do not touch tobacco ever again-it's so easy to become addicted again!
    I have heard it said that nicotine is as addictive as opium, heroine, morphine. I believe it.
    I was unable to quit smoking the first time I attempted to do so. But the desire to quit was still in my mind, and my lungs were very unhappy. So I tried to quit again. Still the desire to smoke was too strong, and again I lit up a cigar. Several months passed, and I again attempted, and again failed. I kept trying to quit, and finally I did stop smoking. I wanted a smoke very much, but I resisted.
    Most of the people that I know who have successfully stopped smoking had the same problem. But we all kept trying to stop. That was the key for us. Do not give up! And do not put yourself down for being unable to stop. Just keep trying.
    Occasionally I still want a smoke, but I have determined to keep away from nicotine. Also, the desire to smoke continually decreases the longer you are away from it.
    Tobacco is very unhealthy. Keep that in mind. Do not feel guilty either.
    Good luck to you! I shall be sending positive vibes your way.
    Also, lungs and heart and the rest the ol' bod begin recovering immediately. To what degree no one can say.
    What to do with all that extra money we will save?
    Gassho
    Jon T
    sat2day and didn't smoke

  29. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by odiedoodie View Post
    Most of the people that I know who have successfully stopped smoking had the same problem. But we all kept trying to stop. That was the key for us. Do not give up! And do not put yourself down for being unable to stop. Just keep trying.
    Yes. What is the old joke?

    Quitting smoking is easy! I have done it 1000 times!

    Like all the precepts. Fall down (hopefully not to bad!), get up, dust off, walk on, do one's best not to fall down again ...

    Gassho, J

    SatToday
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  30. #30
    Fall down seven; get up eight !!

    gassho,

    sat today
    仁道 生開 - Jindo Shokai "Open to life in a benevolent way"
    May we all grow together in our knowledge of the Dharma

  31. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by Shokai View Post
    Fall down seven; get up eight !!

    gassho,

    sat today
    Yes, that is a Japanese saying ... often associated with the round rolly "Bodhidharma" dolls ...



    He has no legs, as they faded away in all his sitting.

    One eye is black and one blank, because one paints the first eye when making a vow (such as to quit smoking! ) and paints the second eye only when it is accomplished.

    Gassho, J

    SatToday

    PS - For those who don't know, Shokai used to live in Japan for quite some time.
    Last edited by Jundo; 01-18-2017 at 02:18 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  32. #32
    Shokai and Jundo, thanks so much. I am sending this on to my son who each day falls down seven but somehow manages to climb back eight in so many parts of his life..

    SAT TODAY
    Shozan

  33. #33
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    Yes, that is a Japanese saying ... often associated with the round rolly "Bodhidharma" dolls ...



    He has no legs, as they faded away in all his sitting.

    One eye is black and one blank, because one paints the first eye when making a vow (such as to quit smoking! ) and paints the second eye only when it is accomplished.

    Gassho, J

    SatToday

    PS - For those who don't know, Shokai used to live in Japan for quite some time.

    Jundo and Shokai, thank you. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    s@today

  34. #34
    I quit alcohol about the time I quit smoking (not) because I really did not quit either, and I lost a job that I thought was my future and then I quit drinking. At 13 years with no alcohol my doctor told me that I has mild emphysema, and I found myself coughing up blood. The guys at my alcoholism support group all said, "I've quit almost everything, so I deserve smoke." One day my 10-year-old daughter ran home from school in tears saying, "Daddy, please quit smoking!" I did not quit smoking. There had been a hundred well-meaning people, tough-minded, no relief, people, and thousands of comments. Then one day I realized my sponsor was not smoking, and I started going to non-smoking groups just to try out what not smoking might feel like, and sometimes I would give away cartons of the stuff just to go out and buy one more carton. That was in the fall, and after Christmas I said, I'm going to quit and I decided to buy packs and remove one cigarette per day and end with the last cigarette the day before my little girl's birthday, all that fall before, that winter, that spring, I wrote a smoking journal, and I smoked the gum, oh I mean chewed!? I had called on everything, I even counted cartons, then packs, then my plan went into play, I quit two days before my daughter's birthday, I thew the last of them away, a week latter, two days before my wife's birthday, I thew away the last of the gum, and only then did I know I was free. I count my daughter's birthday as my anniversary day, and this year it will be 16 years free on my daughter's birthday. I still need three inhalers, mostly only two, and I remember the year I quit my sponsor gave me a special gold filled 13-year medallion for the other addiction, and about 10 years later I learned he suffered from childhood asthma that followed him all his life. I can tell you, I loved my sponsor like no other man in my program, and three years ago I was at his bedside when he died. He had never nagged, never complained, never told me what to do, never told me anything about his asthma, or my emphysema. Before I sit in the morning, I use my inhalers. And very often I think of my sponsor's days before meetings, how he gave people rides, contributed easily to my needs. He was a selfless man who never knew what lotus meant, maybe never heard the word, and today, I still love him, and how he's love helped me find more years with my family. My sponsor always said I'm Larry and I'm still an alcoholic. I have 30 years free from the first addiction, and I say, "I'm Chuck, I a grateful alcoholic." Sixteen years free of cigarettes.

    Tai Shi
    std
    Gassho
    "Nothing is so beautiful as spring--/ When weeds in wheels, shoot long and lovely and lush: Thrush eggs look little low heavens, and thrush/ Through the echoing timber does not rise and wring/ The ear it strikes like lightening to hear him sing;.." Hopkins

  35. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by Tai Shi View Post
    I quit alcohol about the time I quit smoking (not) because I really did not quit either, and I lost a job that I thought was my future and then I quit drinking. At 13 years with no alcohol my doctor told me that I has mild emphysema, and I found myself coughing up blood. The guys at my alcoholism support group all said, "I've quit almost everything, so I deserve smoke." One day my 10-year-old daughter ran home from school in tears saying, "Daddy, please quit smoking!" I did not quit smoking. There had been a hundred well-meaning people, tough-minded, no relief, people, and thousands of comments. Then one day I realized my sponsor was not smoking, and I started going to non-smoking groups just to try out what not smoking might feel like, and sometimes I would give away cartons of the stuff just to go out and buy one more carton. That was in the fall, and after Christmas I said, I'm going to quit and I decided to buy packs and remove one cigarette per day and end with the last cigarette the day before my little girl's birthday, all that fall before, that winter, that spring, I wrote a smoking journal, and I smoked the gum, oh I mean chewed!? I had called on everything, I even counted cartons, then packs, then my plan went into play, I quit two days before my daughter's birthday, I thew the last of them away, a week latter, two days before my wife's birthday, I thew away the last of the gum, and only then did I know I was free. I count my daughter's birthday as my anniversary day, and this year it will be 16 years free on my daughter's birthday. I still need three inhalers, mostly only two, and I remember the year I quit my sponsor gave me a special gold filled 13-year medallion for the other addiction, and about 10 years later I learned he suffered from childhood asthma that followed him all his life. I can tell you, I loved my sponsor like no other man in my program, and three years ago I was at his bedside when he died. He had never nagged, never complained, never told me what to do, never told me anything about his asthma, or my emphysema. Before I sit in the morning, I use my inhalers. And very often I think of my sponsor's days before meetings, how he gave people rides, contributed easily to my needs. He was a selfless man who never knew what lotus meant, maybe never heard the word, and today, I still love him, and how he's love helped me find more years with my family. My sponsor always said I'm Larry and I'm still an alcoholic. I have 30 years free from the first addiction, and I say, "I'm Chuck, I a grateful alcoholic." Sixteen years free of cigarettes.

    Tai Shi
    std
    Gassho
    ❤️
    Gassho
    Jakuden
    SatToday


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    清 道 寂田
    SEIDO JAKUDEN
    I am a novice priest. Any resemblance my posts may have to actual teachings about the Dharma, living or dead, is purely coincidental (and just my attempt to be helpful).

  36. #36
    I quit 6 years ago (having smoked for roughly 28 years prior to that). How? Well, I went to the local doctor and they prescribed me patches. The patches stated that if anyone smoked while wearing them, the side effects would be abhorrent. That worked.

    The nurse told me that research suggests (as it always does) that cold turkey is more susceptible to relapse than aided quitting. God knows that I had tried cold turkey enough times. The patches seemed to have helped.

    I also once tried hypnotism. That was an absolute cinch (for a year), proving to me that the greatest addiction is the mental addiction.

    Good luck in your struggle - it will reveal things about you that nothing else will uncover. Enjoy the journey and know that there are many of us who are rooting for your success and who will still love you even if you falter!

  37. #37
    Quitting is a piece of cake. Staying quit is not. Until you are dead. Then you stay quit for good!

    I heard that the damage to the lungs tends to be permanent, but the damage to the cardiovascular system is not. Chances for a heart attack decrease by 50% 8 hours after you quit. The rest takes several years.

    You will stay quit one way or another. It's up to you when.

    Gasho, Jishin, _/st\_

  38. #38
    I can also testify to the difficulties of relapse. It seems like once you've been a smoker, you'll always be an ex-smoker, not a non-smoker. Supplements do help if needed.

    Good luck.

    Gassho,
    Seido
    SatToday
    The strength and beneficence of the soft and yielding.
    Water achieves clarity through stillness.

  39. #39
    I used to smoke two packs a day for about 10 years. I failed at quitting for about 7 years by chewing nicorette gum incorrectly (chew chew chew, don't stop, chew chew chew), then moving onto the nicorette inhaler and then the lozenge.

    That was about 7 years ago, and now-a-days I only crave the gum. But not very badly, so it's easy to look passed, into the present.

    It's better to get addicted to the gum because it doesn't have rat poison in it, along with not having hundreds of other poisons.

    Most government health insurance or private insurance will pay for the gum, patch, inhaler or lozenge. As they cause your odds of not dying from lung to increase substantially, and increase your odds at quitting smoking.

    Generally I follow the Ozzy Osbourne sobriety test of "I'm not (insert addiction here) today.

    Just don't stop quitting. Keep quitting. Day in day out. Tell yourself you can do it, day in day out.

    Good luck.

    Chris S.

  40. #40
    I found the nicotine patches to be very helpful in terms of cutting the cravings...and the step-down over several weeks worked well for me. One word of caution - do not wear them while sleeping - they caused me to have very vivid, disturbing dreams. Hard candy and gum was also helpful to help with the oral fixation. Good luck to you! You will feel SO much better once you quit!

    Gassho,
    Tanjin
    SatToday
    探 TAN (Exploring)
    人 JIN (Person)

  41. #41
    This thread had been very helpful to me, keep it coming!

    Gassho, sat today
    求道芸化 Kyudo Geika
    I am just a priest-in-training, please do not take anything I say as a teaching.

  42. #42
    Everyone here has given pretty solid advice, so I'll add some medical advice. Many of my patients have had great success with Chantix to help them stop smoking. Many health insurance policies cover it and if they don't the manufacturer often has coupons online that cover most of the cost (assuming you're in the U.S.). You have my compassion and I wish you the best with this difficult road ahead of you. You will feel immensely better once you quit and your body adjusts.

    Gassho, am going to sit immediately after I post this.

  43. #43
    Quote Originally Posted by Josh View Post
    Everyone here has given pretty solid advice, so I'll add some medical advice. Many of my patients have had great success with Chantix to help them stop smoking. Many health insurance policies cover it and if they don't the manufacturer often has coupons online that cover most of the cost (assuming you're in the U.S.). You have my compassion and I wish you the best with this difficult road ahead of you. You will feel immensely better once you quit and your body adjusts.

    Gassho, am going to sit immediately after I post this.
    IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION AND INDICATION

    Some people have had changes in behavior, hostility, agitation, depressed mood, suicidal thoughts or actions while using CHANTIX to help them quit smoking. Some people had these symptoms when they began taking CHANTIX, and others developed them after several weeks of treatment or after stopping CHANTIX. If you, your family or caregiver notice agitation, hostility, depression or changes in behavior, thinking, or mood that are not typical for you, or you develop suicidal thoughts or actions, anxiety, panic, aggression, anger, mania, abnormal sensations, hallucinations, paranoia or confusion, stop taking CHANTIX and call your doctor right away. Also tell your doctor about any history of depression or other mental health problems before taking CHANTIX, as these symptoms may worsen while taking CHANTIX.

    Some people had seizures during treatment with CHANTIX. Most cases happened during the first month of treatment. Tell your doctor if you have a history of seizures. If you have a seizure during treatment with CHANTIX, stop taking CHANTIX and contact your healthcare provider right away.

    Decrease the amount of alcohol you drink while taking CHANTIX until you know if CHANTIX affects your ability to tolerate alcohol. Some people experienced increased drunkenness, unusual or sometimes aggressive behavior, or memory loss of events while consuming alcohol during treatment with CHANTIX.

    Sleepwalking can happen with CHANTIX, and can sometimes lead to behavior that is harmful to you or other people, or to property. Stop taking CHANTIX and tell your doctor if you start sleepwalking.

    Do not take CHANTIX if you have had a serious allergic or skin reaction to CHANTIX. Some people can have serious skin reactions while taking CHANTIX, some of which can become life-threatening. These can include rash, swelling, redness, and peeling of the skin. Some people can have allergic reactions to CHANTIX, some of which can be life-threatening and include: swelling of the face, mouth, and throat that can cause trouble breathing. If you have these symptoms or have a rash with peeling skin or blisters in your mouth, stop taking CHANTIX and get medical attention right away.

    Before starting CHANTIX, tell your doctor if you have a history of heart or blood vessel problems. If you have new or worse heart or blood vessel symptoms during treatment, tell your doctor. Get emergency medical help right away if you have any symptoms of a heart attack or stroke.

    The most common side effects of CHANTIX include nausea (30%), sleep problems, constipation, gas and/or vomiting. If you have side effects that bother you or don’t go away, tell your doctor. You may have trouble sleeping, vivid, unusual or strange dreams while taking CHANTIX. Use caution driving or operating machinery until you know how CHANTIX may affect you.

    CHANTIX should not be taken with other quit-smoking products. You may need a lower dose of CHANTIX if you have kidney problems or get dialysis.

    Before starting CHANTIX, tell your doctor if you are pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or if you take insulin, asthma medicines or blood thinners. Medicines like these may work differently when you quit smoking.

    What is CHANTIX?

    CHANTIX is a prescription medication that, along with support, helps adults 18 and over stop smoking. You may benefit from quit-smoking support programs and/or counseling during your quit attempt. It's possible that you might slip up and smoke while taking CHANTIX. If you do, you can stay on CHANTIX and keep trying to quit.

    Gasho, Jishin, _/st\_

  44. #44
    Hi. I used to smoke. Not a lot, tho', but a smoker nonetheless. How did I quit? Just doing it. Will power if you will. I guess it was like taking a decision to start going to the gym and you actually carry it out. It was overnight. I haven't touched a cigarette since. Hope it helps.

    Sent from my LG-H815 using Tapatalk

  45. #45
    Hi Everyone,
    I was a heavy Duty smoker 2 1/2 - 3 packs a day for almost 30 years. I tried quitting countless times and used gum, patches, cold turkey, etc. I on more than one occasion chewed the gum, wore the patches and smoked at the same time. Even eating bags of baby carrots didn't help. I was able to quit about 10 years ago when my Doctor gave me a prescription for "Wellbutrin". I started taking the medicine, and a week later I realized I hadn't smoked or even thought about cigarettes in a week. I never smoked again. I stopped taking the medicine after two weeks with no side effects. My wife also was a heavy smoker. Her Doctor prescribed "Wellbutrin" and she had the same experience I had. She never smoked again after a week . It worked for us. It is something to discuss with your Doctor.

    Gassho,
    Theophan ( Sekishi )
    Sat Today

  46. #46
    Well, I bought a vaporizer with some very low nicotine. So far, I have been able to stay away from the hard smokes. I feel pretty good about it. The vape takes the edge off but doesn't really replace the addiction, so I think I'll be able to ditch that too.

    Gassho, sat today
    求道芸化 Kyudo Geika
    I am just a priest-in-training, please do not take anything I say as a teaching.

  47. #47
    Robaato
    Guest
    Hi there,

    I quit smoking a few years ago and I'm sober since then. I can easily say (for myself) that quitting smoking was the hardest thing to do. I tried several times, none of my attempts seemed to work. But I kept on trying and finally I quit (hopefully forever).

    Back then quitting was easy because I haven't had many smokers as friends. Nowadays starting smoking is tempting because I got a lot of colleagues who smoke.

    So my advice would be: Just quit (cold turkey). And if you fail, start over again (and probably fail again). There's even a book about by Pema Chodron about failing. Don't give up!

  48. #48
    Quote Originally Posted by Aurkihnowe View Post
    the title says it all....i am trying to quit cold turkey, but ive tried a million times before...the thing is, besides getting winded walking up the stairs to my apt., i want to start running soon....i tried last night, or early this morning to be precise, and let myself down again this afternoon, after waking up at 1, basically a 12 hour nap, and called and bummed a fiver for a cheap pack of cigarettes...

    I want to beat this addiction!!!

    Gassho,

    Richard

    s@ 2day
    I don't believe you.

    Gassho, Jishin, ST

  49. #49

  50. #50
    Hello,

    If you are in the US and call 1.800.QUIT.NOW they will help you quit smoking. That's how I did it. They have quit smoking coaches to talk to and they will also provide a 12 week supply of nicotione replacement...patch, gum or lozenges. The first few days were the most difficult, but it got more tolerable. Hope this helps.

    Gassho,

    Anneliese

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