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Thread: Extinction of some Sentient Beings

  1. #1

    Extinction of some Sentient Beings

    In the U.S. the news focuses much on the loss of lives. Some are grouped into how many died in a natural event, war, fire or a mass shooting. Entertainers or other public figure deaths are often singled out and the news spends many minutes/hours each cycle reviewing their lives. Good/bad, right/wrong I don't know but my emotions tell me there is something not in balance. What I am aware of each year is the extinction of other life forms (not individuals or population but an entire unique species of life) but seldom (ever?) does this make the news cycle here in the US.

    Here are the "species" gone extinct in 2016. For them I sit today.

    http://www.livingalongsidewildlife.c...-2016.html?m=1

    Gassho
    Doshin
    sattoday

  2. #2
    Hello, Doshin,

    Jack Kornfeld, in one of his audiobooks, mentions "keystone species" as an example of interconnectedness. I will leave it to you to explore the concept, but basically, when these species, die, the whole ecosystem is thrown awry...i am look forward to reading "a plea for animals" when i get enough money to buy the e-book. This is the reason i am planning on going vegan soon, after a short few day fast of water and vitamins.

    Metta, Gassho

    richard

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Doshin View Post
    In the U.S. the news focuses much on the loss of lives. Some are grouped into how many died in a natural event, war, fire or a mass shooting. Entertainers or other public figure deaths are often singled out and the news spends many minutes/hours each cycle reviewing their lives. Good/bad, right/wrong I don't know but my emotions tell me there is something not in balance. What I am aware of each year is the extinction of other life forms (not individuals or population but an entire unique species of life) but seldom (ever?) does this make the news cycle here in the US.

    Here are the "species" gone extinct in 2016. For them I sit today.

    http://www.livingalongsidewildlife.c...-2016.html?m=1

    Gassho
    Doshin
    sattoday
    Well put! I will sit for them today as-well. Thank you.

    Gassho,
    Jason

    Sent from my SM-G900R6 using Tapatalk

  4. #4
    Thank you Doshin ... all I know is that ALL life is precious and we should do our best to preserve them as best we can.

    Gassho
    Shingen

    s@today
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

  5. #5
    Yes, all things are impermanent, yet this world is our home and we should maintain it as long as we can.

    We must do all that we can to honor and preserve this world.

    David Loy, who we will be reading in our Book Club next month, is a Buddhist writer very concerned about conservation issues and how modern Buddhists should respond.

    https://voxpopulisphere.com/2015/05/02/david-loy/

    The common presupposition of the more secular Buddhism is that my basic problem is the way my mind works, and the solution is to change the way my mind works, so that I can play my various roles (work, family, friends, etc.) better, so that I fit into this world better. Most of Asian Buddhism is concerned with escaping this world, since samsara can’t be changed, but for much of contemporary Western Buddhism, the path is all about changing myself, because I’m the problem, not the world.

    So while traditional Asian Buddhism emphasizes ending rebirth into this unsatisfactory world, much of Western Buddhism, including most of the mindfulness movement, emphasizes harmonizing with this world. That means neither is much concerned about social engagement that works to change our world; both take the world (including its ecological crisis and social injustice) for granted, and in that sense accept it as it is.

    Both approaches encourage a different way of reacting to the eco-crisis: ignoring it. When we read or think about what is happening, how do we react? We become anxious, of course, but Buddhists know how to deal with anxiety: we meditate, and our unease about what is happening to the earth goes away—for a while, anyway. Needless to say, that is not an adequate response.

    ...

    There is an alternative way of understanding the Buddhist path, one that is not reducible to the either/or of escaping this world or simply harmonizing with it. The path of personal transformation is about deconstructing and reconstructing the self, or, more precisely, the relationship between the self and its world. Because my sense of self is an impermanent psychosocial construct, with no reality of its own, it is always insecure, haunted by dukkha [suffering] as long as I feel separate from the world I inhabit. We usually experience this as a sense of lack: something is wrong with me, something is missing, “I’m not good enough.” Consumerism encourages us to perceive the problem as a personal lack: I don’t have enough money, I’m not famous enough, attractive enough, and so on. Buddhist practice helps us wake up from this bad dream.

    A really important social implication of this deconstruction and reconstruction of the self brings us back to social engagement, including eco-dharma, the application of Buddhist teachings to our ecological situation. As we start to wake up and realize that we are not separate from each other, nor from this wondrous earth, we also begin to realize that the ways we live together, and the ways we relate to the earth, need to be reconstructed as well. That means not only social engagement as service, but finding ways to address the problematic economic and political structures—the institutionalized forms of greed, ill will, and delusion—that are deeply implicated in the eco-crisis. Within such a notion of liberation, the path of personal transformation and the path of social transformation are not really separate from each other. We must reclaim the concept of awakening from an exclusively individualistic therapeutic model and focus on how individual liberation also requires social transformation. Engagement in the world is how our personal awakening blossoms.

    It just so happens that the Buddhist tradition provides a wonderful archetype that can help us to do that: the bodhisattva. We overcome deep-rooted self-centered habits by working compassionately for the healing of our societies and the healing of the earth. This is what’s required for the Buddhist path to become truly liberative in the modern world. If we Buddhists can’t do that, or don’t want to do it, then Buddhism might not be what our world needs right now.


    Gassho, Jundo

    SatToday
    Last edited by Jundo; 12-30-2016 at 02:28 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  6. #6
    Member Seishin's Avatar
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    I'll read Jundo's post later but my 2 cents : Does this not just typify man focus on himself, me myself and I and others like me. If the human race became extinct overnight there'd be no headlines and the world would be a better place for the sentient beings left behind. I've been watching quite a few natural history programs recently and fight hard against the anger when man is evident the threat to so many creature and don't even realize it.


    Seishin

    Sei - Meticulous
    Shin - Heart

  7. #7
    Yes Jundo I am looking forward to reading David Loy's book with all of you.

    Gassho
    Doshin
    Sattoday

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