Page 21 of 21 FirstFirst ... 11192021
Results 1,001 to 1,050 of 1050

Thread: The Zen of Technology & Scientific Discovery! (& Robots)

  1. #1001
    I might sometimes sound a bit "out there" for talking about how we had best use some of this tech, and what Zen and Buddhism have to say about doing so ...

    ... but I am not so "out there." This from today's news.

    Just what we all need: Elon Musk and X in our heads!


    Neuralink, Elon Musk’s brain implant startup, set to begin human trials

    After receiving approval from an independent review board, Neuralink is set to begin offering brain implants to paralysis patients as part of the PRIME Study, the company said. PRIME, short for Precise Robotically Implanted Brain-Computer Interface, is being carried out to evaluate both the safety and functionality of the implant.

    Trial patients will have a chip surgically placed in the part of the brain that controls the intention to move. The chip, installed by a robot, will then record and send brain signals to an app, with the initial goal being “to grant people the ability to control a computer cursor or keyboard using their thoughts alone,” the company wrote.

    ... In his new book about Neuralink’s founder, author Walter Isaacson reported that Musk was inspired by science fiction authors such as Iain Banks to pursue a “human-machine interface technology called ‘neural lace’ that is implanted into people and can connect all of their thoughts to a computer.” ...

    ... But employees told Reuters in December that the company is rushing to market, resulting in careless animal deaths and a federal investigation.

    Neuralink did not respond to CNN’s request for comment.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/09/20/tech/m...als/index.html

    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  2. #1002
    A necessary step perhaps, but with ethical concerns to weigh ...

    https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...qorruYMuVlbTTo

    AT NEW MENTAL HEALTH COURTS IN CALIFORNIA, JUDGES WILL BE ABLE TO MANDATE TREATMENT

    [NPR] For years, she refused help, insisting to all who offered, "I'm not sick," until police arrested her for petty theft and public drunkenness. A judge gave her an ultimatum: jail or treatment. She chose treatment.

    "I'm so thankful that they did that," said Sweeney, now 52. "I needed that. I think there's others out there that need it, too."

    If she hadn't been compelled to get care, Sweeney said, she wouldn't be alive today, back at work and reunited with her husband. It's why she supports California's new civil CARE Courts that will launch this fall in eight counties, including San Francisco, Los Angeles, and Orange, followed by the rest of the state in 2024.

    Under the new system, family members and first responders can ask county judges to order people with psychotic illness into treatment, even if they are not unhoused or haven't committed a crime.

    A judge will then determine if a person meets criteria for the program and may oversee a care agreement or compel a treatment plan. That treatment plan could even include involuntary commitment.

    ... That tension — between those who advocate for treatment being voluntary and those who say the status quo allows people to die in the streets "with their rights on" — is playing out all over the state of California.
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  3. #1003
    Member Myojin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2023
    Location
    Sakura-shi, Chiba Prefecture, Japan
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    A necessary step perhaps, but with ethical concerns to weigh ...

    https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...qorruYMuVlbTTo



    Gassho, J

    stlah
    Can you not be sectioned if you are judged a liability in the US? In the UK, if you show psychotic symptoms or similar, and are judged unfit by a psychiatrist you get forced into the psyche ward, essentially mandatory treatment, on the understanding that you are no longer fit to make a rational decision.

    Sattday

    Dan

  4. #1004
    Quote Originally Posted by Dan65 View Post
    Can you not be sectioned if you are judged a liability in the US? In the UK, if you show psychotic symptoms or similar, and are judged unfit by a psychiatrist you get forced into the psyche ward, essentially mandatory treatment, on the understanding that you are no longer fit to make a rational decision.

    Sattday

    Dan
    I think that, if you read the details of this, it is a little different in scope. I believe that you are speaking of civil commitment.

    When it comes to mental illness, the problem of when to treat people who don't know they need treatment or people who resist treatment is a tough one. For decades now, compelling people into care, something called involuntary commitment, has been deemphasized as an option and considered only as a last resort. The thinking is that the patient should have autonomy and participate in their care. But now Democratic states such as Oregon and California are reconsidering their approaches as mental health, the drug epidemic and also homelessness become increasingly political problems.

    ... The attention to this has really been rooted in homelessness, which is a huge problem in California. Half of the unsheltered population in the country lives here. And even though only a quarter or a third of those folks have a serious mental illness, that is where we're seeing a lot of policy proposals being directed. So this year the state is rolling out something called Care Courts. This is where a family member or a doctor can refer someone who has a psychotic illness to court. And a judge will draw up a care plan that the person is strongly encouraged to accept. Another recent proposal is to expand who qualifies for involuntary commitment. One doctor told me about a patient who's homeless who has both diabetes and schizophrenia, and he keeps cycling in and out of the emergency room because he's not taking his diabetes medication. And that's because he's not taking his antipsychotic medication. So right now doctors' hands are tied with a patient like this...

    ... Because being unable to take care of your own medical needs is not a reason that doctors can intervene under the current law, and that is something that they want to change. ...

    ... Why is changing civil commitment such a nonstarter in Oregon where, like, in California, they're honestly considering changing it? ... I think a few things are still different here [in California]. First, the power to force a civil commitment in Oregon is very narrow but maybe not quite as narrow as in California. So to take one of April's examples, in Oregon, a person who is not taking diabetes medication due to psychosis - that person could be successfully civilly committed. The legislature made a small change in 2015 that makes those cases a little easier to pursue. But there's real resistance to going further. And the biggest issue by far is treatment capacity for mental illness and substance use disorders. There's just limited political interest in forcing more people into treatment when the system can barely handle the patients it has right now. ... The state [Oregon] has two dedicated psychiatric hospitals with about 600 beds total. And over the last decade, more of those beds have been needed for people who are in county jails who are too mentally ill to understand the charges against them.

    So the result is that most civilly committed patients are denied a bed at the state hospital. And then there's no community beds, either. Like, sending someone to a nursing home or an adult foster home or a residential treatment facility - those beds were in really short supply already.

    https://www.npr.org/2023/03/28/11666...ary-commitment
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  5. #1005
    Part man part pig part man ...

    Groundbreaking transplant of pig heart into living recipient is performed for the second time ever

    ... The groundbreaking surgery was done on September 20 at UMMC by the same transplant team that preformed the first such experimental surgery in 2022.

    In a news release, the hospital said the recipient, 58-year-old Lawrence Faucette, “is currently breathing on his own, and his heart is functioning well without any assistance from supportive devices.” ... Faucette had end-stage heart disease. He had pre-existing peripheral vascular disease and complications with internal bleeding making him ineligible for a traditional heart transplant, the hospital said in the release. ...

    ... The pig heart used came from a genetically modified pig from Revivcor, a subsidiary the United Therapeutics Corporation. The pig had 10 genes edited, including three genes “knocked out” or inactivated to eliminate the alpha gal sugar in the pig’s blood cells, which can trigger a severe reaction in the human immune system, causing organ rejection. An additional pig gene was modified to control for the growth of the pig’s heart while 6 human genes were added into the pig’s genome to increase acceptance by the immune system. ...


    https://us.cnn.com/2023/09/22/health...ver/index.html
    This hit me in the kidneys ...

    Scientists Discover a Previously Unknown “Housekeeping” Process in Kidney Cells

    ... scientists discovered a unique “housekeeping” process in kidney cells where unwanted content is ejected, rejuvenating the cells. This mechanism, different from typical regeneration in other organs, could explain why kidneys stay healthy for a lifetime. ...

    ... Unlike the liver and skin, where cells divide to create new daughter cells and regenerate the organ, cells in the proximal tubules of the kidney are mitotically quiescent — they do not divide to create new cells. In cases of a mild injury or disease, kidney cells do have limited repair capabilities, and stem cells in the kidney can form new kidney cells, but only up to a point, said Dr. Jie Zheng ... The researchers found proximal tubular cells that had formed outwardly facing bulges in their luminal membranes that contained not only gold nanoparticles but also lysosomes, mitochondria, endoplasmic reticulum, and other organelles typically confined to a cell’s interior. The extruded contents were then pinched off into a vesicle that floated off into the extracellular space.

    “At that moment, we knew this was an unusual phenomenon,” Yu said. “This is a new method for cells to remove cellular contents.”

    https://scitechdaily.com/sweeping-di...-kidney-cells/
    One more piece of the puzzle ...

    A source of carbon — a building block of life — is found on Jupiter's moon Europa

    In an intriguing breakthrough, astronomers have concluded that carbon, an essential component of life on Earth, is also present within Europa, Jupiter's ice-covered moon that's believed to hold huge oceans of liquid salt water beneath its icy surface.

    The findings come from analyzing images from NASA's James Webb Space Telescope, which found the carbon "likely originated in the subsurface ocean," according to a summary of two papers about the analysis.

    "The discovery signals a potentially habitable environment in the ocean of Europa," according to the Webb telescope's website.

    ... [BUT] ... It's important to remember that in this context, a "habitable environment" on Europa refers to a salty ocean encased by an ice shell that's believed to be 10 to 15 miles thick, on a moon where the sunlight is about 25 times fainter than on Earth. If that's not enough to make you put away your swimsuit, consider the neighborhood bully: Europa is under the thrall of Jupiter's radiation and gravity — the latter is so strong, it's believed to create tides that rip the moon's thick ice crust apart.

    But NASA says tidal flexing on Europa could also produce the heat and nutrients that encourage life. So while the differences between conditions on Earth are stark, similarities, like the likely presence of carbon, are compelling. And while Europa is a bit smaller than our Moon, its ocean is estimated to hold more than twice as much water as all of Earth's oceans together.

    The new findings come a year before NASA's ambitious Europa Clipper mission, which will launch in October of 2024 and reach the Jovian moon in 2030.


    https://www.npr.org/2023/09/22/12010...er-moon-europa
    Life recipes ... and carbon may not always be needed ...

    New Chemical Recipes for Life’s Origins: Guiding Us to Distant Planets Inhabited by Extraterrestrials

    Life on a faraway planet — if it’s out there — might not look anything like life on Earth. But there are only so many chemical ingredients in the universe’s pantry, and only so many ways to mix them. A team led by scientists at the University of Wisconsin–Madison has exploited those limitations to write a cookbook of hundreds of chemical recipes with the potential to give rise to life.

    Their ingredient list could focus the search for life elsewhere in the universe by pointing out the most likely conditions — planetary versions of mixing techniques, oven temperatures, and baking times — for the recipes to come together. ... “The origin of life really is a something-from-nothing process,” says Betül Kaçar, a NASA-supported astrobiologist and UW–Madison professor of bacteriology. “But that something can’t happen just once. Life comes down to chemistry and conditions that can generate a self-reproducing pattern of reactions.”

    https://scitechdaily.com/new-chemica...aterrestrials/

    ... The search for plausible prebiotic autocatalytic systems has been generally centered on carbon-mediated cycles because biological autocatalysis largely relies on organic substrates mediated by linear polymers, e.g., proteins and nucleic acids. No reason has been unequivocally enunciated, however, to ignore wholesale other elements and inorganic compounds that might have scaffolded life’s origins terrestrially or elsewhere in the cosmos. ...

    https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/jacs.3c07041
    Bring em back alive ...

    Scientists recover RNA from an extinct species for the first time


    Geneticists have for the first time isolated and decoded RNA molecules from a creature that died out long ago.

    The genetic material — which came from a 130-year-old Tasmanian tiger, or thylacine, specimen in the collection of the Swedish Museum of Natural History in Stockholm — has allowed scientists to better understand how the animal’s genes functioned. The researchers shared their findings in a study published Tuesday in the scientific journal Genome Research. ... “We had previously thought only DNA remained in old museum and ancient samples, but this paper shows you can also get RNA from tissues,” ... Mármol Sánchez said that while de-extinction wasn’t the goal of his team’s research, a better understanding of the Tasmanian tiger’s genetic makeup could help recently launched efforts to bring back the animal in some form.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/09/19/world/...scn/index.html
    Brains came ...

    Tiny Unique Sea Creatures Reveal the Ancient Origins of Neurons

    Approximately 800 million years ago, our brain cell components began to take shape in shallow seas.
    Research published in the journal Cell offers new insights into the evolution of neurons, focusing on the placozoans, a millimeter-sized marine animal. Scientists from the Centre for Genomic Regulation in Barcelona discovered that the specialized secretory cells in these ancient and unique animals may have given rise to neurons in more complex animals.

    ... Surprisingly, the peptidergic cells shared many similarities to neurons – a cell type that didn’t appear until many millions of years later in more advanced animals such as bilateria. ... “We were astounded by the parallels,” says Dr. Sebastián R. Najle, co-first author of the study and postdoctoral researcher at the Centre for Genomic Regulation. “The placozoan peptidergic cells have many similarities to primitive neuronal cells, even if they aren’t quite there yet. It’s like looking at an evolutionary stepping stone.”

    The dawn of the neuron
    The study demonstrates that the building blocks of the neuron were forming 800 million years ago in ancestral animals grazing inconspicuously in the shallow seas of ancient Earth. From an evolutionary point of view, early neurons might have started as something like the peptidergic secretory cells of today’s placozoans. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/tiny-unique...ns-of-neurons/
    What we have learned ...

    Scientists Discover That the Genes for Learning and Memory Are 650 Million Years Old

    Researchers have found that genes linked to complex behaviors like learning and aggression originated around 650 million years ago, potentially influencing the Cambrian Explosion. This discovery may provide insights into the origins of various complex behaviors in animals, including humans.


    A team of scientists led by researchers from the University of Leicester has determined that genes responsible for learning, memory, aggression, and other complex behaviors emerged approximately 650 million years ago.

    ... Dr. Feuda said: “We’ve known for a long time that monoamines like serotonin, dopamine, and adrenaline act as neuromodulators in the nervous system, playing a role in complex behavior and functions like learning and memory, as well as processes such as sleep and feeding.“However, less certain was the origin of the genes required for the production, detection, and degradation of these monoamines. Using the computational methods, we reconstructed the evolutionary history of these genes and showed that most of the genes involved in monoamine production, modulation, and reception originated in the bilaterian stem group. This finding has profound implications on the evolutionary origin of complex behaviors such as those modulated by monoamines we observe in humans and other animals.”

    The authors suggest that this new way to modulate neuronal circuits might have played a role in the Cambrian Explosion – known as the Big Bang – which gave rise to the largest diversification of life for most major animal groups alive today by providing flexibility of the neural circuits to facilitate the interaction with the environment.

    Dr. Feuda added: “This discovery will open new important research avenues that will clarify the origin of complex behaviors and if the same neurons modulate reward, addiction, aggression, feeding, and sleep.”

    https://scitechdaily.com/scientists-...ion-years-old/
    Boom ...

    Cosmic Enigma Decoded: World’s First 3D Simulations Reveal the Physics of Exotic Supernovae

    This image depicts the final physical distributions of the exotic supernova, with four distinct color quadrants representing different physical quantities: I. temperature, II. velocity, III. radiative energy density, and IV. gas density. The white dashed circle indicates the position of the supernova photosphere. From this image, the entire star becomes turbulent from the inside out. The positions where ejected materials collide closely match the photosphere, indicating the production of thermal radiation during these collisions, which efficiently propagates outward and simultaneously creates an uneven gas layer. This image helps us understand the underlying physics of exotic supernovae and provides an explanation for the observed phenomena.

    Old wood ...

    476,000 Years Ago: Archaeologists Discover World’s Oldest Wooden Structure

    Research from the University of Liverpool and Aberystwyth University reveals humans were constructing wooden structures 476,000 years ago at Kalambo Falls, Zambia. This discovery, dated using advanced techniques, highlights the early human capability to settle and challenges previous notions about Stone Age lifestyles. ... earlier than was previously thought possible ...

    ... Expert analysis of stone tool cut marks on the wood shows that these early humans shaped and joined two large logs to make a structure, probably the foundation of a platform or part of a dwelling. ... A digging stick and other wooden tools were found at the same site. ...


    https://scitechdaily.com/settlement-...den-structure/

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/09/20/africa...scn/index.html
    Old shoe ...

    Archaeologists discover 2,000-year-old child’s shoe with laces intact


    A shoe belonging to a child and dating back more than 2,000 years has been unearthed in Austria with its laces still intact.

    The design of the leather shoe, whose size roughly corresponds to EU 30 (US 12), suggests it was likely made in the second century BC, according to the German Mining Museum Bochum-Leibniz Research Museum for Geo-resources.



    https://us.cnn.com/2023/09/20/world/...scn/index.html
    An AI Brain? A Brain AI?

    A new study bridging neuroscience and machine learning offers insights into the potential role of astrocytes in the human brain.

    Artificial neural networks are ubiquitous machine-learning models that can be trained to complete many tasks. Their name stems from the fact that their architecture is inspired by the way biological neurons process information in the human brain. Scientists discovered a new type of more powerful neural network model known as a transformer about six years ago. These models can achieve unprecedented performance, such as by generating text from prompts with near-human-like accuracy. A transformer underlies AI systems such as OpenAI’s ChatGPT and Google’s Bard, for example. While incredibly effective, transformers are also mysterious: Unlike with other brain-inspired neural network models, it hasn’t been clear how to build them using biological components.

    Bridging Biology and Transformers

    Now, researchers from MIT, the MIT-IBM Watson AI Lab, and Harvard Medical School have produced a hypothesis that may explain how a transformer could be built using biological elements in the brain. They suggest that a biological network composed of neurons and other brain cells called astrocytes could perform the same core computation as a transformer. ...

    ... Their hypothesis provides insights that could spark future neuroscience research into how the human brain works. At the same time, it could help machine-learning researchers explain why transformers are so successful across a diverse set of complex tasks. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/neurons-ast...lly-plausible/
    I need AI to help me keep all the new AI straight in my mind ...

    Google’s Bard artificial intelligence chatbot is evolving.

    The company on Tuesday announced a series of updates to Bard that will give the chatbot access to Google’s full suite of tools — including YouTube, Google Drive, Google Flights and others — to assist users in a wider variety of tasks. Users will be able, for example, to ask Bard to plan an upcoming trip, complete with real flight options. Or a user could ask the tool to summarize meeting notes made in a recent Google Drive document.

    The connections to Google’s other services are just some of the improvements to Bard coming Tuesday. Other updates include the ability to communicate with the chatbot in multiple languages, new fact-checking capabilities and a broad update to the large language model that the tool is built on.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/09/19/tech/g...tes/index.html
    Too much carbon ...

    70 Gigatonnes – Steel Plant Upgrades Could Save Equivalent of Two Years of Global Carbon Emissions

    Upgrading, or retrofitting, the world’s iron and steel processing plants early could reduce carbon emissions by up to 70 gigatonnes by 2050, which is roughly equivalent to two years’ worth of net global carbon emissions.

    ... The scientists discovered that as of 2019, the last year that data is available, 74.5% of the world’s steel was produced in coal-powered plants that release considerable carbon emissions. Technologies exist to reduce these admissions, but upgrades are expensive and time-consuming and so are usually only undertaken at the end of a processing unit’s operational lifetime.

    Refining is also hard on the equipment, and the individual processing units within each plant need to be retrofitted periodically to prolong their operational lifetimes. Overall, 43.2% of global iron and steel plants have been retrofitted with new technologies or have otherwise enhanced their processes to extend their operating lifetime. The frequency of their retrofits depends on the technique they employ and how old they are, but typically they occur after 15 to 27 years of use.

    The team found that if all currently operating processing units were upgraded to incorporate low-emissions technology at their predicted time of their refit, total emissions from the iron and steel sector could be reduced by 58.7 gigatonnes between 2020 and 2050, but if all the refits and upgrades were bumped forward and completed five years early, the total carbon savings would be 16% greater at 69.6 gigatonnes.

    https://scitechdaily.com/70-gigatonn...bon-emissions/
    China cuts off the world ...

    China just stopped exporting two minerals the world’s chipmakers need

    China’s exports of two rare minerals essential for manufacturing semiconductors fell to zero in August, a month after Beijing imposed curbs on sales overseas, citing national security.

    China produces about 80% of the world’s gallium and about 60% of germanium, according to the Critical Raw Materials Alliance, but it didn’t sell any of the elements on international markets last month, Chinese customs data released on Wednesday showed. In July, the country exported 5.15 metric tons of forged gallium products and 8.1 metric tons of forged germanium products. ... China may be the industry leader in producing the two elements, but there are alternative producers, as well as available substitutes for both materials, Eurasia Group analysts said in a July research report. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/09/21/econom...hnk/index.html

    Gassho, J

    stlah
    Last edited by Jundo; 09-23-2023 at 12:27 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  6. #1006
    Start packing, we only have 250 million years more. But, I suspect, we won't be on the planet by then, or will find a way to fine tune the sun and volcanoes. 250 million years is a long time, after all ...

    A study predicts a mass extinction of mammals in 250 million years due to extreme heat from the formation of a supercontinent.

    The research highlights the lethal combination of a hotter sun, increased CO2, and continental effects, underscoring the importance of landmass layouts in evaluating the habitability of exoplanets.

    Unprecedented heat is likely to lead to the next mass extinction since the dinosaurs died out, eliminating nearly all mammals in some 250 million years’ time, according to a new study.

    The research, published on September 25 in the journal Nature Geoscience and led by the University of Bristol, presents the first-ever supercomputer climate models of the distant future and demonstrates how climate extremes will dramatically intensify when the world’s continents eventually merge to form one hot, dry and largely uninhabitable supercontinent.

    The findings project how these high temperatures are set to further increase, as the sun becomes brighter, emitting more energy and warming the Earth. Tectonic processes, occurring in the Earth’s crust and resulting in supercontinent formation would also lead to more frequent volcanic eruptions which produce huge releases of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere, further warming the planet.

    Mammals, including humans, have survived historically thanks to their ability to adjust to weather extremes, especially through adaptations such as fur and hibernating in the cold, as well as short spells of warm weather hibernation.

    While mammals have evolved to lower their cold temperature survivable limit, their upper-temperature tolerance has generally remained constant. This makes exposure to prolonged excessive heat much harder to overcome and the climate simulations, if realized, would ultimately prove unsurvivable.

    BELOW: This image shows the geography of today's Earth and the projected geography of Earth in 250 million years, when all the continents converge into one supercontinent


    https://scitechdaily.com/mass-extinc...triple-whammy/

    and

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/09/26/world/...scn/index.html
    But in the shorter term, although we won't be wiped out as a species, still great concerns ...

    Breaching the Limit: Global Concerns Rise As Six Key Planetary Boundaries Are Exceeded

    A new study updates the planetary boundary framework and shows human activities are increasingly impacting the planet and, thereby, increasing the risk of triggering dramatic changes in overall Earth conditions.

    For over 3 billion years, the interaction between life (represented by the planetary boundary, Biosphere Integrity) and climate have controlled the overall environmental conditions on Earth. Human activities, for example replacing nature with other land uses, changing the amount of water in rivers and in soil, the introduction of synthetic chemicals to the open environment, and the emission of greenhouse gases to the atmosphere all influence these interactions. ... The nine “planetary boundaries” represent components of the global environment that regulate the stability and liveability of the planet for people. The degree of breaching of the safe boundary levels is caused by human-driven activities impacting the components. The planetary boundaries framework applies the newest scientific understanding of the functioning of the Earth system to identify a ”safe operating space” for humanity by proposing limits for the extent to which human activities can be allowed to impact critical processes without risk of potentially triggering irreversible changes in the Earth conditions that support us.

    ... “Crossing six boundaries in itself does not necessarily imply a disaster will ensue but it is a clear warning signal. We can regard it as we do our own blood pressure. A BP over 120/80 is not a guarantee of a heart attack but it increases the risk of one. Therefore, we try to bring it down. For our own – and our children’s – sakes we need to reduce the pressure on these six planetary boundaries.” ...


    https://scitechdaily.com/breaching-t...-are-exceeded/
    In happier news, we are slowly getting ready for that jump to the stars ...

    (Just a little note that the Japanese Space Agency, JAXA, already accomplished this a couple of years ago, so this is only a milestone for NASA ... )

    Astrophysicist explains why NASA milestone is 'incredible'

    NASA returned its first ever asteroid sample to Earth seven years after launching into space. The OSIRIS-REx spacecraft flew by Earth to deliver the pristine sample from the near-Earth asteroid Bennu.


    More here: https://www.npr.org/2023/09/24/12013...-back-to-earth

    NASA is also making waves here ...

    NASA’s Cosmic Vision: Simulating Our Galaxy Through Gravitational Waves

    Using simulated data, astronomers have depicted the sky through gravitational waves, revealing the need for space observatories to detect binary systems. Future projects like LISA aim to uncover thousands of these hard-to-detect systems, marking a paradigm shift in space observation. (Artist’s illustration — see video below for simulation.)

    Astronomers using simulated data have produced a glimpse of the sky as it would appear in gravitational waves, cosmic ripples in space-time generated by orbiting objects. The image shows how space-based gravitational wave observatories expected to launch in the next decade will enhance our understanding of our galactic home.

    BELOW: Watch as gravitational waves from a simulated population of compact binary systems combine into a synthetic map of the entire sky. Such systems contain white dwarfs, neutron stars, or black holes in tight orbits. Maps like this using real data will be possible once space-based gravitational wave observatories become active in the next decade. Brighter spots indicate sources with stronger signals and lighter colors indicate those with higher frequencies. Larger colored patches show sources whose positions are less well known. The inset shows the frequency and strength of the gravitational signal, as well as the sensitivity limit for LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna), an observatory now being designed by ESA (European Space Agency) in collaboration with NASA for launch in the 2030s. Credit: NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center


    https://scitechdaily.com/nasas-cosmi...ational-waves/
    And more music of the spheres ...

    Stellar Concert: Astronomers Tune In to the Sounds of Twinkling Stars

    Northwestern University scientists have developed the first 3D simulations to study the energy rippling from a massive star’s core to its outer surface, providing new insights into stars’ inherent ‘twinkle’.


    The team also converted these waves into sound, enabling listeners to ‘hear’ the inside of a star and its natural twinkle.


    https://scitechdaily.com/stellar-con...inkling-stars/
    Merging Black Holes ...

    Using new simulation technology, scientists predict the existence of massive merging black holes in Milky Way-like galaxies, challenging established theories.

    ... Stellar-mass black holes are celestial objects born from the collapse of stars with masses of a few to low hundreds of times that of our sun. Their gravitational field is so intense that neither matter nor radiation can evade them, making their detection exceedingly difficult. Therefore, when the tiny ripples in spacetime produced by the merger of two black holes were detected in 2015, by the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory (LIGO), it was hailed as a watershed moment. According to astrophysicists, the two merging black holes at the origin of the signal were about 30 times the mass of the sun and located 1.5 billion light-years away. What mechanisms produce these black holes? Are they the product of the evolution of two stars, similar to our sun but significantly more massive, evolving within a binary system? Or do they result from black holes in densely populated star clusters running into each other by chance? Or might a more exotic mechanism be involved? All of these questions are still hotly debated today.

    ... “Models prior to POSYDON predicted a negligible formation rate of merging binary black holes in galaxies similar to the Milky Way, and they particularly did not anticipate the existence of merging black holes as massive as 30 times the mass of our sun. POSYDON has demonstrated that such massive black holes might exist in Milky Way-like galaxies” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/challenging...f-black-holes/
    A possible hint of life in Europe ... I mean, on "Europa" ...

    Webb spots a building block of life on Jupiter’s moon Europa

    Two independent teams of astronomers used the James Webb Space Telescope to observe the frozen surface of Europa, and each analysis of the space observatory’s detections revealed an abundance of carbon dioxide within a specific region of the frigid terrain. Both studies describing the findings were published September 21 in the journal Science. ... Europa is one of several ocean worlds in our solar system besides Earth where scientists believe life could exist. Beneath a thick ice shell, Europa harbors a subsurface global ocean that may contain twice as much water as our planet’s oceans.

    But environments suitable for life need more than water — they also require a supply of organic molecules and an energy source, according to NASA. “We now think that we have observational evidence that the carbon we see on Europa’s surface came from the ocean. That’s not a trivial thing. Carbon is a biologically essential element,” said Samantha Trumbo, lead author of the second study and a 51 Pegasi B Fellow at Cornell University, in a statement. Scientists have long questioned whether Europa’s ocean contained carbon and other chemicals necessary for life. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/09/27/world/...scn/index.html
    Building blocks in deep space too ...

    Never Before Detected – Organic Molecule Essential for Life Found in Interstellar Space

    Tryptophan is among the 20 vital amino acids necessary for protein synthesis, crucial for life’s evolution on Earth. This amino acid has many spectral features in the infrared, as had been previously characterized by Susana Iglesias Groth, an IAC researcher.

    Utilizing data from the Spitzer Space Observatory, she identified over 10 emission bands for this molecule, the strongest according to her laboratory measurements. ... The study presents evidence that tryptophan-associated emission lines may also be present in other star-forming regions and suggests that its presence, and possibly that of other amino acids, is common in the gas from which stars and planets form. “It is likely that amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, may be enriching the gas in the protoplanetary discs and atmospheres of young, newly formed exoplanets and perhaps accelerating the emergence of life there,” says Iglesias-Groth. ...

    ... “It is well known that amino acids are part of meteorites and may have been present as early as the formation of the Solar System” explains Iglesias-Groth. “The discovery of tryptophan and, hopefully, of other amino acids in the future, could indicate that protein-building agents, which are key to the development of living organisms, exist naturally in the regions where stars and planetary systems form, and that life may be more common in our Galaxy than we could have predicted” she concludes ...


    https://scitechdaily.com/never-befor...stellar-space/
    And more ways to look into space are coming ...

    Constructing the World’s Largest Optics: The Giant Magellan Telescope’s Final Mirror Fabrication Begins

    The Giant Magellan Telescope is finalizing its last primary mirror, with the goal to surpass current space telescopes in sensitivity and resolution. ... Together, the mirrors will collect more light than any other telescope in existence, allowing humanity to unlock the secrets of the Universe by providing detailed chemical analyses of celestial objects and their origin. ...

    ... Last week, the University of Arizona Richard F. Caris Mirror Lab closed the lid on nearly 20 tons of the purest optical glass inside a one-of-a-kind oven housed beneath the stands of the Arizona Wildcats Football Stadium. The spinning oven will heat the glass to 1,165°C (2,129°F) so as it melts, it is forced outward to form the mirror’s curved paraboloid surface. Measuring 8.4 meters (26.7 feet) in diameter—about two stories tall when standing on edge—the mirror will cool over the next three months before moving into the polishing stage.


    https://scitechdaily.com/constructin...cation-begins/
    Now, from the very vast to the very small ...

    Unveiling the Quantum World: Scientists Capture Quantum Entanglement of Photons in Real-Time

    Researchers have pioneered a technique for swiftly and efficiently reconstructing the full quantum state of entangled particles, utilizing advanced camera technology to visualize the wave function of two entangled photons in real time. The innovative method is exponentially faster than previous ones, taking minutes or seconds instead of days, and holds the potential for advancing quantum technology by enhancing quantum state characterization, quantum communication, and quantum imaging techniques.

    https://scitechdaily.com/unveiling-t...-in-real-time/
    No antimatter anti-gravity levitation! There goes my anti-matter hoverboard!

    Antimatter Levitation Debunked: Groundbreaking CERN Experiment Reveals Gravity’s Pull on Antihydrogen

    An experiment by the ALPHA collaboration at CERN has shown that antihydrogen, a combination of an anti-proton and an antielectron, is pulled downward by gravity, dispelling the idea of antigravity for antimatter. This aligns with Einstein’s general relativity theory, which predates antimatter’s discovery and suggests that all matter, regular or anti, reacts identically to gravitational forces.

    ... “The bottom line is that there’s no free lunch, and we’re not going to be able to levitate using antimatter.” ...

    ... Nevertheless, the idea that antimatter and matter might be affected differently by gravity was enticing because it could potentially explain some cosmic conundrums. For example, it could have led to the spatial separation of matter and antimatter in the early universe, explaining why we see only a small amount of antimatter in the universe around us. Most theories predict that equal amounts of matter and antimatter should have been produced during the Big Bang that birthed the universe. ...


    https://scitechdaily.com/antimatter-...-antihydrogen/
    Maybe genetics can help us adapt to the new super hot super-continent??

    Scientists Successfully Genetically Modify Individual Cells in Living Animals

    Researchers have developed a technique using CRISPR-Cas to simultaneously modify multiple genes in the cells of adult animals, creating a mosaic-like pattern that simplifies studying genetic diseases. This approach has uncovered new insights into the genetic disorder 22q11.2 deletion syndrome and holds the potential to decrease the number of animal experiments in the future. Credit: ETH Zurich

    One proven method for tracking down the genetic origins of diseases is to knock out a single gene in animals and study the consequences this has for the organism. The problem is that for many diseases, the pathology is determined by multiple genes, complicating the task for scientists trying to pinpoint the contribution of any single gene to the condition. To do this, they would have to perform many animal experiments – one for each desired gene modification.

    Researchers led by Randall Platt, Professor of Biological Engineering at the Department of Biosystems Science and Engineering at ETH Zurich in Basel, have now developed a method that will greatly simplify and speed up research with laboratory animals: using the CRISPR-Cas gene scissors, they simultaneously make several dozen gene changes in the cells of a single animal, much like a mosaic.

    While no more than one gene is altered in each cell, the various cells within an organ are altered in different ways. Individual cells can then be precisely analyzed. This enables researchers to study the ramifications of many different gene changes in a single experiment.

    https://scitechdaily.com/scientists-...iving-animals/
    It is sometime good to marry your cousin ...

    A Genetic Paradox: Inbreeding Can Be Beneficial in the Long Run

    Despite the challenges of inbreeding and limited genetic diversity, the Svalbard reindeer have remarkably adapted to harsh living conditions in an extraordinarily short period, a situation researchers term a genetic paradox. However, the question remains: can they withstand the impacts of climate change?

    ... Evolutionary theory suggests this is a poor starting point since inbreeding can quickly lead to an accumulation of harmful mutations and genetic variants followed by disease and death. But this has not prevented the Svalbard reindeer from evolving into what is today a viable population of more than 20,000 animals. “Despite the low genetic diversity, they have managed to develop a number of adaptations to life in the High Arctic. They are, for example, smaller in size and have shorter legs than other northern reindeer and caribou subspecies,” says Dussex. ... “In this case, we are dealing with a population that suffers from a high degree of inbreeding, which is usually bad news for a small population. But inbreeding can also help a population to get rid of harmful mutations, a phenomenon technically called ‘purging’,” says Martin. ...

    [But] It is far from certain that the Svalbard reindeer will be able to adapt as well to the rapid changes that result from global warming. The adaptations the reindeer have developed for the extreme arctic climate may fall short as the archipelago is now rapidly warming, which is changing both snow cover and vegetation. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/a-genetic-p...-the-long-run/
    Well, we can't survive the hot age, but got through the ice age ...

    Unraveling an Ice Age Mystery – New Study Reveals Surprises About Early Human Migration

    A recent study analyzed pollen data around Lake Baikal in Siberia to uncover details about early human migration across Europe and Asia 45,000-50,000 years ago. The evidence suggests that warming temperatures supported expanding forests, facilitating human migration into Siberia, and contradicting some previous archaeological perspectives.

    ... the pollen data suggest that the dispersal of people occurred during some of the highest temperatures in the late Pleistocene, which also would have featured higher humidity. The ancient pollen record shows coniferous forests and grasslands characterized the region, able to support foraging and hunting by humans. Goebel said the environmental data, combined with archeological evidence, tell a new story.

    “This contradicts some recent archaeological perspectives in Europe,” said the KU researcher. “The key factor here is accurate dating, not just of human fossils and animal bones associated with the archaeology of these people, but also of environmental records, including from pollen. What we have presented is a robust chronology of environmental changes in Lake Baikal during this time period, complemented by a well-dated archaeological record of Homo sapiens’ presence in the region.” ...

    BELOW: Map showing theorized migration routes of early Homo sapiens from Africa across Eurasia.


    https://scitechdaily.com/unraveling-...man-migration/
    Mysteries and discoveries still remain right here on earth ...

    Scientists Discover New Insect Genus in Peruvian Rainforest

    Capitojoppa amazonica is a large parasitoid wasp species that has only been discovered in the Allpahuyao-Mishana National Reserve in the Peruvian Amazon. Here, the wasp is photographed from the front.


    https://scitechdaily.com/scientists-...an-rainforest/
    We won't need sex soon ... or, on the brighter side, anyone soon can have a child ... fairly soon, anyway ...

    Japanese scientists race to create human eggs and sperm in the lab

    ... Hayashi, a developmental geneticist at Osaka University in Japan, is a pioneer in one of the most exciting — and controversial — fields of biomedical research: in vitro gametogenesis, or IVG.

    The goal of IVG is to make unlimited supplies of what Hayashi calls "artificial" eggs and sperm from any cell in the human body. That could let anyone — older, infertile, single, gay, trans — have their own genetically related babies. Besides the technical challenges that remain to be overcome, there are deep ethical concerns about how IVG might eventually be used. ... IPS cells can be made from any cell in the body and then theoretically can morph into any other kind of cell. This versatility could one day help scientists solve a long list of medical problems.

    Hayashi was the first to figure out how to use iPS cells to make one of the first big breakthroughs in IVG: He turned skin cells from the tails of mice into iPS cells that he then turned into mouse eggs. ...

    ... Researchers at a biotech startup called Conception, based in California, claim they're about to lap the Japanese scientists. Within a year, they say they'll be ready to make human eggs they hope to try to fertilize to make human embryos. But the Americans have released few details to back up their claim.

    Hayashi's skeptical.

    "It's impossible," Hayashi says. "In my opinion — one year — I don't think so."

    Unraveling the biology of human egg development just doesn't move that fast, he says.

    That said, Hayashi thinks it's not a question if IVG will ever happen. It's more a question of when, he says, and that he and his colleagues in Japan are at least as close as the Americans to making "artificial" human embryos.

    Hayashi predicts they'll have an IVG egg ready to try to fertilize within five to 10 years. ...

    ... In addition to waiting to publish their research before making any claims, the Japanese scientists also warn that many years of experimentation would be needed to make sure artificial IVG embryos aren't carrying dangerous genetic mutations.

    "They may cause some sort of diseases, or maybe cancer, or maybe early death. So there are many possibilities," Saitou says. "Even single mutations or mistakes are really disastrous." ...

    ... IVG would render the biological clock irrelevant, by enabling women of any age to have genetically related children. That raises questions about whether there should be age limits for IVG baby-making.

    IVG could also enable gay and trans couples to have babies genetically related to both partners, for the first time allowing families, regardless of gender identity, to have biologically related children.

    Beyond that, IVG could potentially make traditional baby-making antiquated for everyone. An unlimited supply of genetically matched artificial human eggs, sperm and embryos for anyone, anytime could make scanning the genes of IVG embryos the norm.

    Prospective parents would be able to minimize the chances their children would be born with detrimental genes. IVG could also lead to "designer babies," whose parents pick and choose the traits they desire.

    "That [would] mean maybe exploitation of embryos, commercialization of reproduction. And also you could manipulate genetic information of those sperm and egg," says Misao Fujita, a bioethicist at the University of Kyoto who's been studying Japanese public opinion about IVG.

    The Japanese public is uncomfortable with IVG for those reasons. But the Japanese would even be uneasy about using this technology to create babies outside of traditional family structures, she says.

    "If you can create artificial embryos, then that mean[s] maybe a single person can create their own baby. So who is [the] mother and father? So that means social confusion," Fujita says.

    https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...erm-in-the-lab
    Maybe after the mammals are gone, AI will replace us ... or figure out how to save us ...

    ChatGPT can now see, hear, and speak

    We are beginning to roll out new voice and image capabilities in ChatGPT. They offer a new, more intuitive type of interface by allowing you to have a voice conversation or show ChatGPT what you’re talking about.

    Voice and image give you more ways to use ChatGPT in your life. Snap a picture of a landmark while traveling and have a live conversation about what’s interesting about it. When you’re home, snap pictures of your fridge and pantry to figure out what’s for dinner (and ask follow up questions for a step by step recipe). After dinner, help your child with a math problem by taking a photo, circling the problem set, and having it share hints with both of you.


    https://openai.com/blog/chatgpt-can-...hear-and-speak

    ChatGPT’s voice capability is “powered by a new text-to-speech model, capable of generating human-like audio from just text and a few seconds of sample speech,” Open AI said in the blogpost. The company added that it collaborated with professional voice actors to create the five different voices that can be used to animate the chatbot. ... The new features roll out in the app within the next two weeks for paying subscribers of ChatGPT’s Plus and Enterprise services. (Subscriptions to the Plus service are $20 a month, and its Enterprise service is currently only offered to business clients).

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/09/25/tech/c...ate/index.html
    And getting smarter ...

    100x Efficiency: MIT’s Machine-Learning System Based on Light Could Yield More Powerful Large Language Models

    MIT system demonstrates greater than 100-fold improvement in energy efficiency and a 25-fold improvement in compute density compared with current systems.

    ChatGPT has made headlines around the world with its ability to write essays, email, and computer code based on a few prompts from a user. Now an MIT-led team reports a system that could lead to machine-learning programs several orders of magnitude more powerful than the one behind ChatGPT. The system they developed could also use several orders of magnitude less energy than the state-of-the-art supercomputers behind the machine-learning models of today.

    https://scitechdaily.com/100x-effici...nguage-models/
    But the humans are still ahead ... for now ...

    Radiologists vs. Robots: Outperforming AI in Identifying Lung Diseases on Chest X-Rays

    Radiologists surpassed AI in accurately detecting three common lung diseases from chest X-rays, as per a study in the Radiology journal. AI tools, while sensitive, produced more false positives, making them less reliable for autonomous diagnoses but useful for second opinions.

    https://scitechdaily.com/radiologist...-chest-x-rays/
    AI is already doing so good things, however imperfectly ...

    Revolutionary AI Set To Predict Your Future Health With a Single Click

    Researchers from Edith Cowan University developed software that rapidly analyzes bone density scans to detect abdominal aortic calcification (AAC), a predictor of cardiovascular events and other health risks. The software processed images with 80% agreement with experts and could revolutionize early disease detection during routine clinical practice.

    https://scitechdaily.com/revolutiona...-single-click/
    This is AI HUGE!

    Paralyzed man regains some [Hand] function after world-first surgery

    A 46-year-old Swiss man who was paralyzed after a devastating fall has regained some movement following groundbreaking surgery that appeared to successfully install an implant on his brain using artificial intelligence.

    https://us.cnn.com/videos/world/2023...cnni-world.cnn

    Paralyzed Man Can Use Feel Again Thanks to Groundbreaking AI

    AI can often more understanding of human behavior and movement ...

    GlowTrack: Unleashing the Power of AI To Track Human and Animal Behavior

    Current cutting-edge methods utilize artificial intelligence to automatically track parts of the body as they move. However, training these models is still time-intensive and limited by the need for researchers to manually mark each body part hundreds to thousands of times.

    Now, Associate Professor Eiman Azim and team have created GlowTrack, a non-invasive movement-tracking method that uses fluorescent dye markers to train artificial intelligence. GlowTrack is robust, time-efficient, and high definition—capable of tracking a single digit on a mouse’s paw or hundreds of landmarks on a human hand.

    https://scitechdaily.com/glowtrack-u...imal-behavior/
    But AI can also track and spy on us in other ways ...

    Exposing the secretive company at the forefront of facial recognition technology

    Facial recognition technology is convenient when you use it to unlock your phone or log into an app. But you might be surprised to know that your face is most likely already in a facial recognition database that can be used to identify who you are without you even being aware it's happening or knowing who's using it and why.

    A company expanding the technological possibilities of this technology and testing its legal and ethical limits is Clearview AI. It's a startup whose clients already include some law enforcement and government agencies. If you haven't already heard of it, it's in part because the company didn't want you to know it existed. It did its best to remain secretive until it was exposed by my guest, Kashmir Hill. She's a New York Times tech reporter who first wrote about Clearview AI in 2020. She describes her beat as the future tech dystopia and how we can try to avoid it. Kashmir has continued to report on Clearview AI and other developments in facial recognition technology. Now, she has a new book called "Your Face Belongs To Us: A Secretive Startup's Quest To End Privacy As We Know It."

    ... For police use of this technology, you know, it can be very useful for solving crimes, but, you know, it can also be wielded in a way that could be very chilling or intimidating. Say, if there are protesters against police brutality and the government is able to very easily identify them. And we have seen this already happen in other countries, not with Clearview AI's technology but with other facial recognition technology. In China, you know, this kind of technology has been used to identify protesters in Hong Kong, to identify Uyghur Muslims and for more surprising uses like naming and shaming people who wear pajamas in public or making sure that somebody in a public restroom doesn't take too much toilet paper. They have to look at a face recognition camera, only get a little bit of toilet paper and then wait a certain amount of time until their face can unlock more. ...

    JUNDO: A fascinating interview, highly recommended:

    https://www.npr.org/2023/09/28/12023...ion-technology
    AI and automation might help places like Japan with a labor shortage, but also unemployment caused by AI!!!

    Japan labor market set for change as huge worker shortage looms

    Japan's labor market may be at an inflection point as the nation braces for a shortfall of millions of workers, the rise of generative AI and risks to economic security. ... In the short term, labor shortages are evident in the pandemic-hit services sector, with labor-intensive areas like nursing care and construction already struggling. ... The institute estimates 9.7 million jobs will be lost by 2035 due to the effects of digitalization, including AI. But labor will still be in short supply that year as a result of a push for green and digital transformations and efforts to boost the nation's semiconductor industry. ... One challenge for the broader Japanese labor market is that the percentage of workers with non-routine, or "creative," tasks in relation to routine ones is lower than in countries like the United States and Britain, the institute said, expecting a severe labor shortage for professional technical occupations. ...
    The International Labor Organization says generative AI, which is neither inherently good nor bad, will "augment" rather than destroy jobs. The U.N. agency is calling for governments and others to design the right policies to ensure a smooth transition because costs to affected workers will be "brutal." ...
    https://mainichi.jp/english/articles...0m/0bu/037000c
    Hopefully, we will regulate AI better than the internet ... doubtful ...

    FCC [in USA] to reintroduce rules protecting net neutrality

    he US government aims to restore sweeping regulations for high-speed internet providers such as AT&T, Comcast and Verizon, reviving “net neutrality” rules for the broadband industry — and an ongoing debate about the internet’s future.

    The proposed rules from the Federal Communications Commission will designate internet service — both the wired kind found in homes and businesses as well as mobile data on cellphones — as “essential telecommunications” akin to traditional telephone services, said FCC Chairwoman Jessica Rosenworcel. The rules would ban internet service providers (ISPs) from blocking or slowing down access to websites and online content.

    In addition to the prohibitions on blocking and throttling internet traffic, the draft rules also seek to prevent ISPs from selectively speeding up service to favored websites or to those that agree to pay extra fees, Rosenworcel said, a move designed to prevent the emergence of “fast lanes” on the web that could give some websites a paid advantage over others.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/09/26/tech/f...ers/index.html
    Maybe we will handle AI better than atomic weaponry ... which, sadly, is far from over ...

    Birthplace of atomic bomb braces for biggest mission since the Manhattan Project

    The community is facing growing pains as Los Alamos National Laboratory takes part in the country’s most ambitious nuclear weapons effort since World War II


    ... 80 years later, as Los Alamos National Laboratory takes part in the nation’s most ambitious nuclear weapons effort since World War II. The mission calls for modernizing the arsenal with droves of new workers producing plutonium cores — key components for nuclear weapons. ...

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news...ect-rcna117097
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    Last edited by Jundo; 09-30-2023 at 06:25 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  7. #1007
    A rather silly article, but I like the advice ...

    Black holes can teach us how to live our best lives

    ... One such researcher is Priyamvada Natarajan, an astrophysicist and the chair of the astronomy department at Yale University. Natarajan studies supermassive black holes. These are black holes that are at the center of almost all galaxies whose masses range from over a hundred thousand Suns to a few billion. And after talking with Natarajan about the science of black holes, I realized that these enigmatic objects are actually overflowing with valuable life lessons.

    Lesson One: Push the limits, even if others doubt you

    Lesson Two: Reputation isn't everything

    Lesson Three: Do your thing, whether people get you or not

    https://www.npr.org/2023/10/05/12037...t-life-lessons
    The connection to black holes is a bit of a stretch (the same thing that happens if you fall in one! ), but sound advice nonetheless.

    Gassho J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  8. #1008
    Speaking of black holes ... space sounds! ...

    Echoes Across Space: The Universal Sound of Black Holes

    ... Scientists at HITS, Germany, have predicted that the ‘chirp’ noise generated when two black holes merge preferentially occurs in two universal frequency ranges. ... The merger of two stellar-mass black holes releases gravitational waves with escalating frequency, known as the chirp signal, which can be detected on Earth. By analyzing the progression of this frequency (the chirp), scientists can calculate the “chirp mass,” a mathematical representation of the combined mass of the two black holes.


    https://scitechdaily.com/echoes-acro...f-black-holes/
    Attaboy for the attosecond ...

    Nobel Prize in physics won by trio who created rapid flashes of light to ‘capture the shortest of moments’

    The 2023 Nobel Prize in physics has been awarded to a team of scientists who created a ground-breaking technique using lasers to understand the extremely rapid movements of electrons, which were previously thought impossible to follow.

    Pierre Agostini, Ferenc Krausz and Anne L’Huillier “demonstrated a way to create extremely short pulses of light that can be used to measure the rapid processes in which electrons move or change energy,” the Nobel committee said when the prize was announced in Stockholm on Tuesday. ... The movements of electrons inside atoms and molecules are so rapid that they are measured in attoseconds – an almost incomprehensibly short unit of time. “An attosecond is to one second as one second is to the age of the universe,” the committee explained. ... “This is another transformative moment in physics and in science, where a whole new (way) to probe the universe was opened up by the work of these three physicists,” Moloney added.


    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/03/europe...scn/index.html
    So extreme ... like on other worlds ...

    Surviving the Extremes: Exploring the Existence of Life at 52°C/124°F

    Biologists from Syracuse University are examining the processes that enable microbial eukaryotes to flourish in the harsh environment of ... some of the harshest environments on Earth: extremely hot and acidic geothermal lakes. ... Oliverio notes that the team’s genome-scale findings will contribute important missing data into reconstructions of the tree of life. “This will further our understanding of the distribution and evolution of life on Earth.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/surviving-t...f-life-at-125/
    Where life came from?

    From Atoms to Organisms: “Assembly Theory” Unifies Physics and Biology To Explain Evolution and Complexity

    Assembly theory bridges the gap between physics and biology in explaining how complex objects are identifiable as products of evolution and how reusability of parts allows novelty and identical intricate items to be constructed by selection in nature ... “Assembly Theory provides a completely new lens for looking at physics, chemistry, and biology as different perspectives of the same underlying reality,” explained lead author Professor Sara Walker, a theoretical physicist and origin of life researcher from Arizona State University. “With this theory, we can start to close the gap between reductionist physics and Darwinian evolution – it’s a major step toward a fundamental theory unifying inert and living matter.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/from-atoms-...nd-complexity/
    Conscious nonsense? ... panpsychic panning ...

    Consciousness & Controversy: Why Leading Theory Faces “Pseudoscience” Backlash

    Tensions are high in consciousness research, with over 100 researchers criticizing the Integrated Information Theory (IIT) as pseudoscientific. While IIT suggests that consciousness is more widespread than traditionally believed, critics argue that its broad claims lack comprehensive empirical support. ...

    Integrated information theory – often referred to as IIT – is a very ambitious theory of consciousness proposed by neuroscientist Giulio Tononi. It ultimately aims to give mathematically precise conditions for when any system – a brain or some other lump or matter – is or is not conscious. The theory revolves around a mathematical measure of integration of information, or interconnections, labeled with the Greek letter ϕ. The basic idea is that a system becomes conscious at the precise moment when there is more ϕ in the system as a whole than in any of its parts. IIT implies that many more things are conscious than we ordinarily suppose. This means it gets close to a kind of “panpsychism” – the view that consciousness pervades the physical universe. Having said that, there are big differences between IIT and the new wave of Bertrand Russell-inspired panpsychism which has recently been making waves in academic philosophy, and which has been the focus of much of my research. IIT even implies, as pointed out by the computer scientist Scott Aaronson, that an inactive grid of connected logic gates would be conscious.

    https://scitechdaily.com/consciousne...ence-backlash/
    A practical invention that will save lives ...

    MIT’s New Desalination System Produces Freshwater That Is “Cheaper Than Tap Water”

    Engineers at MIT and in China are aiming to turn seawater into drinking water with a completely passive device that is inspired by the ocean, and powered by the sun. ... The configuration of the device allows water to circulate in swirling eddies, in a manner similar to the much larger “thermohaline” circulation of the ocean. This circulation, combined with the sun’s heat, drives water to evaporate, leaving salt behind. The resulting water vapor can then be condensed and collected as pure, drinkable water. In the meantime, the leftover salt continues to circulate through and out of the device, rather than accumulating and clogging the system. ... The researchers estimate that if the system is scaled up to the size of a small suitcase, it could produce about 4 to 6 liters of drinking water per hour and last several years before requiring replacement parts. At this scale and performance, the system could produce drinking water at a rate and price that is cheaper than tap water.

    “For the first time, it is possible for water, produced by sunlight, to be even cheaper than tap water,” says Lenan Zhang, a research scientist in MIT’s Device Research Laboratory. The team envisions a scaled-up device could passively produce enough drinking water to meet the daily requirements of a small family. The system could also supply off-grid, coastal communities where seawater is easily accessible.


    https://scitechdaily.com/mits-new-de...han-tap-water/
    A bunch of AI issues ...

    AI girlfriends imperil generation of young men

    Using Artificial Intelligence apps, "young men get in these AI relationships," says Professor Liberty Vittert. "And because the AI learns from you exactly what you like and don't like, you end up having these perfect relationships. So when you go into real life...there's ups and downs they are not able to deal with."


    https://us.cnn.com/videos/business/2...ion-of-men.cnn
    Pop idols who don't need to be paid ...

    ‘The only thing we can’t do is sign autographs’: The rise of virtual K-pop bands

    Built using AI technology, Eternity is one of the latest South Korean acts pushing the boundary between real and virtual entertainment. And the group’s creator and management company, Pulse9, believes that computer-generated stars have a significant edge over their real-life counterparts.

    As with most popular K-pop groups, Eternity’s members include a group leader, vocalists, rappers and dancers. But one member in particular, Zae-in, can do it all. “Zae-in has (a combination of) characteristics that most human artists would be hard-stretched to pull off,” said the firm’s CEO Park Ji-eun. “She can sing very well, rap very well and she can be creative as a (fashion) designer. And she’s a natural-born actress.”

    A video by Eternity ...





    https://us.cnn.com/style/kpop-virtua...hnk/index.html
    Fake Hanks ...

    Tom Hanks says dental plan video uses ‘AI version of me’ without permission

    Hollywood star Tom Hanks has “nothing to do with” an artificial intelligence version of himself that is promoting “some dental plan,” he said on Instagram on Sunday. ... Hanks also suggested on the same podcast that the technology could allow him to keep appearing in new movies after he dies.

    “Anybody can now recreate themselves at any age they are by way of AI or deep fake technology … I could be hit by a bus tomorrow and that’s it, but my performances can go on and on and on,” he added. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/02/entert...cli/index.html
    AI make me Neurotic ...

    OpenAI is encouraging people to use ChatGPT for therapy. That’s dangerous.

    Just because a chatbot can recite language that appears therapeutic doesn’t mean its empathetic.


    This is a disconcerting development. That the company’s head of safety and its president are encouraging the public to think of a chatbot as a way to get therapy is surprising and deeply reckless. OpenAI profits from exaggerating and misleading the public about what its technology can and can’t do — and that messaging could come at the expense of public health.

    Weng’s language anthropomorphized ChatGPT by talking about feeling “heard” and “warm,” implying the AI has an ability to listen and understand emotions. In reality, ChatGPT’s humanlike language emerges from its ultra-sophisticated replication of language patterns that draws from behemoth databases of information. This capability is robust enough to help ChatGPTS users conduct certain kinds of research, brainstorm ideas and write essays in a manner that resembles a human. But that doesn’t mean it’s capable of performing many of the cognitive tasks of a human. Crucially, it cannot empathize with or understand the inner life of a user; it can at best only mimic how one might do so in response to specific prompts.

    https://www.msnbc.com/opinion/msnbc-...nai-rcna118058
    Lighting up the brain ...

    Theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation treatment could reduce cigarette cravings.

    A recent study from the University of Missouri School of Medicine indicates a potential alternative method to address cigarette cravings.

    The research demonstrates that by using theta-burst transcranial magnetic stimulation (TBS) – powerful and quickly changing magnetic pulses that influence brain activity – individuals may experience enhanced self-control, diminished cravings, and subsequently, decreased cigarette consumption.

    https://scitechdaily.com/goodbye-cig...ne-dependence/
    We share genes with vegetables too ...

    Being a vegetarian might be in your DNA

    The study published Wednesday in PLOS One found that there are four genes associated with how well someone is able to adhere to a vegetarian lifestyle.

    “At this time we can say is that genetics plays a significant role in vegetarianism and that some people may be genetically better suited for a vegetarian diet than others,” said lead study author Dr. Nabeel Yaseen, professor emeritus of pathology at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/04/health...ess/index.html
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    Last edited by Jundo; 10-05-2023 at 03:44 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  9. #1009
    Discoveries and JUMBO mysteries up there ...

    Unprecedented discovery seems to defy fundamental astronomical theories

    The Orion Nebula, a glowing cloud of dust and gas, is one of the brightest nebulae in the night sky and identifiable as the sword in the Orion constellation. Located 1,300 light-years from Earth, the nebula has long presented astronomers with a wealth of celestial objects to study, including planet-forming disks around young stars and brown dwarfs, or objects with a mass between that of planets and stars.
    [Astonomers using Webb] zoomed in on the Trapezium Cluster, a young star-forming region that’s about 1 million years old, filled to the brim with thousands of new stars. In addition to the stars, the scientists spotted brown dwarfs, which are too small to kick-start the nuclear fusion at their cores to become stars.

    On the hunt for other low-mass isolated objects, the astronomers found something they had never seen: pairs of planet-like objects with masses between 0.6 and 13 times the mass of Jupiter that appear to defy some fundamental astronomical theories ... The astronomers found 40 pairs of JuMBOs and two triple systems, all on wide orbits around one another. Although they exist in pairs, the objects are typically about 200 astronomical units apart, or 200 times the distance between Earth and the sun. It can take between 20,000 and 80,000 years for the objects to complete an orbit around each other.

    ... But no existing theories explain how the JuMBOs formed, or why they’re present in the Orion Nebula ... For instance, some may consider the JuMBOs to be like rogue planets, or objects of planetary mass that freely travel through space without orbiting stars. But many rogue planets begin by orbiting stars before being ejected, and it would be hard to explain how pairs of them were kicked out at the same time while remaining gravitationally connected to each other. ... Pearson said. “The main thing that we learn from this is that there is something fundamentally wrong with either our understanding of planet formation, star formation, or both.”

    BELOW: Five JuMBOs can be seen in this image, which zoomed in on the finer details of the larger Webb portrait of the Trapezium Cluster in the Orion Nebula.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/05/world/...scn/index.html
    Explosive mysteries ...

    Hubble’s Hitchcock Moment: A Bizarre Explosion in Unexpected Place

    A clear starry night is deceptively tranquil to backyard skygazers. In reality, the sky is ablaze with things that go pop in the night – like paparazzi flash cameras going off. Most of these flashes are stellar explosions or collisions. They are so faint they can only be captured by the unblinking eye of telescopes that continually keep watch on the nighttime sky for such transients.

    Among the rarest of these random cosmic events are a small class called Luminous Fast Blue Optical Transients (LFBOTs). They shine intensely in blue light and evolve rapidly, reaching peak brightness and fading again in a matter of days, unlike supernovae which take weeks or months to dim.

    The first LFBOT was found in 2018. Presently, they are captured once a year and so only a handful are known. There are several theories behind what causes the powerful explosions. But Hubble came along and made this phenomenon even more mysterious.

    One LFBOT popped up in 2023 in a place where no one expected it be – far between two galaxies. Only Hubble could exactly pinpoint its surprising location. If a flavor of extraordinarily powerful supernovae causes LFBOTs, they should blow up in the spiral arms of galaxies where star birth is underway. The massive newborn stars behind supernovae don’t live long enough to go wandering off beyond their nesting ground inside a galaxy.

    BELOW: A Hubble Space Telescope image of a Luminous Fast Blue Optical Transient (LFBOT) designated AT2023fhn, indicated by pointers. ... The surprise is that this latest transient, seen in 2023, lies at a large offset from both the barred spiral galaxy at right and the dwarf galaxy to the upper left.


    https://scitechdaily.com/hubbles-hit...xpected-place/
    A Billion-Year-Old “Circumnuclear Ring ...

    Hubble Captures Galaxy With Brilliant Blue Arms and Billion-Year-Old “Circumnuclear Ring”

    NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope has captured this detailed image of NGC 6951 ... an intermediate spiral galaxy 78 million light-years away in the Cepheus constellation. ... Turbulent regions of gas, shown in dark red, surround the bright blue pinpricks that are star clusters. ... At the center of NGC 6951 lies a supermassive black hole surrounded by a ring of stars, gas, and dust about 3,700 light-years across. This “circumnuclear ring” is between 1 and 1.5 billion years old and has been forming stars for most of that time. Scientists hypothesize that interstellar gas flows through the dense, starry bar of the galaxy to the circumnuclear ring, which supplies new material for star formation. Up to 40 percent of the mass in the ring comes from relatively new stars that are less than 100 million years old. Spiral lanes of dust, shown in dark orange, connect the center of the galaxy to its outer regions, contributing more material for future star formation. ...


    https://scitechdaily.com/hubble-capt...mnuclear-ring/
    Psyched up about psyche ...

    For the first time, a NASA mission is setting off on a distant journey to visit a metal world in our solar system.

    Getting up close with the asteroid known as Psyche is the only way to determine whether it’s the rare exposed core of an early planetary building block, according to scientists. The metal-rich asteroid is in the main asteroid belt between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter. The namesake Psyche spacecraft is expected to lift off Thursday. ... The giant space rock is about 235 million to 309 million miles (378 million to 497 million kilometers) from the sun. After launch, the mission will arrive in orbit around the asteroid in 2029 and spend about two years studying Psyche with a suite of scientific instruments to determine its true nature. ... Scientists believe that studying Psyche could help them address key questions about planet formation. Earth, Mercury and Mars have metallic cores, but they are too deep below their planets’ rocky shells to be seen or studied directly. ...

    Artist's conception below:


    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/06/world/...scn/index.html
    Mysteries remaining inside us ... liking physics and biology ...

    Challenging Long-Held Assumptions: New Research Reveals How Nuclear Spin Impacts Biological Processes

    Researchers discovered the significant impact of nuclear spin on biological processes, specifically oxygen dynamics in chiral environments [Chirality, or handedness, means that an object or molecule cannot be superimposed on its mirror image by any translations or rotations]. This breakthrough could revolutionize biotechnology, quantum biology, isotope separation, and NMR technology. ... Scientists have long believed that nuclear spin had no impact on biological processes. However, recent research has shown that certain isotopes behave differently due to their nuclear spin. ... This connection between the tiny world of particles and living beings likely goes back billions of years when life began and molecules with a special shape called chirality appeared. Chirality is important because only molecules with the right shape can do the jobs they need to in living things. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/challenging...cal-processes/
    Parts of us get overlooked ...

    Princeton Scientists Discover Overlooked Parts of Proteins That Are Critical to Fundamental Functions of Life

    Protein condensates (shown here in a microscope image) are critical to the process of gene expression in cells, and condensate formation depends on proteins’ intrinsically disordered regions. ...

    According to textbooks, proteins work by folding into stable 3D shapes that, like Lego blocks, precisely fit with other biomolecules. However, this depiction of proteins, the “workhorses of biology,” doesn’t tell the whole story. Around half of all proteins have stringy, unstructured bits hanging off them, dubbed intrinsically disordered regions, or IDRs. Now, a multi-institutional collaboration has uncovered how a key aspect of cell biology is controlled by IDRs. Their study, recently published in the journal Cell, reveals that IDRs have specific and important interactions that play a central role in chromatin regulation and gene expression, essential processes across every living cell. ... The researchers focused on disordered regions of the human cBAF complex, a multi-component group of proteins in the nucleus that works to open up the densely coiled-up DNA inside cells called chromatin, enabling genes along DNA to be expressed and turned into proteins. ... In particular, the study revealed that the IDRs form little droplets called condensates that separate out from surrounding cellular fluid, just like drops of oil in water. The specific interactions that happen in these condensates allow proteins and other biomolecules to congregate in particular locations to carry out cellular activities. ...


    https://scitechdaily.com/princeton-s...tions-of-life/
    Who discovered America?

    Scientists say they’ve confirmed evidence that humans arrived in the Americas far earlier than previously thought

    When the discovery of fossilized footprints made in what’s now New Mexico was made public in 2021, it was a bombshell moment for archaeology, seemingly rewriting a chapter of the human story. Now new research is offering further evidence of their significance. While they look like they could have been made yesterday, the footprints were pressed into mud 21,000 to 23,000 years ago, according to radiocarbon dating of the seeds of an aquatic plant that were preserved above and below the fossils.

    This date dramatically pushed back the timeline of humans’ history in the Americas, the last landmass to be settled by prehistoric people. The 61 dated prints, which were discovered in the Tularosa Basin, near the edge of an ancient lake in White Sands National Park, were made ... around the time of the Last Glacial Maximum, a period between 19,000 and 26,000 years ago when two massive ice sheets covered the northern third of North America, reaching as far south as New York City, Cincinnati and Des Moines, Iowa. The ice and cold temperatures would have made a journey between Asia and Alaska impossible during that time, meaning the people who made the footprints likely arrived much earlier.

    Speaking of climate changes ... maybe some good news ... but still seems like a drop in the bucket ...

    U.S. transition to clean energy is happening faster than you think, reporter says

    Recently, a team of reporters at the New York Times produced what kind of feels like an optimistic break from the doom and gloom of climate news. Huge swaths of our country are turning away from fossil fuels as an energy source and investing in wind, solar and other renewable energy. We're talking places like Texas and Oklahoma, once dominated by oil and gas, now building essentially new industries. The New York Times' three-part series called "The Energy Transition" explores the speed, challenges, politics and economics of this move toward newer sources of energy.

    https://www.npr.org/2023/10/05/12038...-reporter-says
    ... and then there is climate ignorance ...

    People working on climate solutions are facing a big obstacle: conspiracy theories

    Climate disinformation in the past — sometimes paid for by fossil fuel interests — often related to false ideas that global warming is a scam or that the threat is overblown. Those falsehoods are still around, but what we're seeing a lot more of these days are attacks on climate solutions even if we don't always know who funds them. Think attacks on renewables. False ideas that wind turbines cause cancer or cause birth defects in animals. Disinformation may be spreading because solutions are really spreading.

    For instance, this weekend we'll have a story about a trend in urban planning called 15-minute cities — designing cities so that you access amenities in a short walk, bike ride or trip on public transport. Now there's a conspiracy theory saying that this is a way to restrict people's movement or to trap people in an open-air prison. ...

    ... Different kinds of false information spread in different ways. But if you're considering misleading claims about climate — that's predominantly on the right. And that involves an information ecosphere defined by Joe Rogan, as we heard above, but also Alex Jones, Breitbart, the Daily Wire, the Daily Mail, the New York Post, and above all Fox News. ...

    https://www.npr.org/2023/10/05/12038...disinformation
    AI may be an improvement over human idiocy ... The billionaire guy who makes my Japanese smart phone says ...

    SoftBank CEO says artificial general intelligence will come within 10 years

    SoftBank CEO Masayoshi Son said he believes artificial general intelligence (AGI), artificial intelligence that surpasses human intelligence in almost all areas, will be realized within 10 years.

    Speaking at the SoftBank World corporate conference, Son said he believes AGI will be ten times more intelligent than the sum total of all human intelligence. He noted the rapid progress in generative AI that he said has already exceeded human intelligence in certain areas.

    “It is wrong to say that AI cannot be smarter than humans as it is created by humans,” he said. “AI is now self learning, self training, and self inferencing, just like human beings.”

    Son has spoken of the potential of AGI — typically using the term “singularity” — to transform business and society for some years, but this is the first time he has given a timeline for its development.

    He also introduced the idea of “Artificial Super Intelligence” at the conference which he claimed would be realized in 20 years and would surpass human intelligence by a factor of 10,000.

    Son is known for several canny bets that have turned SoftBank into a tech investment giant as well as some bets that have spectacularly flopped.

    He’s also prone to making strident claims about the transformative impact of new technologies. His predictions about the mobile internet have been largely borne out while those about the Internet of Things have not [JUNDO: Yet! ].

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/04/tech/j...ntl/index.html
    Crispr gets Crispier ...

    Gene-Editing Breakthrough: Compact Enzyme Promises More Effective Treatments

    A new CRISPR gene-editing tool, AsCas12f, smaller than the commonly used Cas9, has been engineered for better efficiency and effectiveness in treating genetic disorders. Tested successfully in mice, this tool could lead to more compact and efficient genome-editing applications in humans. ... The compact size means that more of it can be packed into carrier viruses and delivered into living cells, making it more efficient.

    Researchers created a library of possible AsCas12f mutations and then combined selected ones to engineer an AsCas12f enzyme with 10 times more editing ability than the original unmutated type.

    https://scitechdaily.com/gene-editin...ve-treatments/
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  10. #1010
    FROM SCI-FI TO REALITY: DOES A BRAIN IN A DISH HAVE MORAL RIGHTS?

    Inventors of brain-cell-based computers collaborate with a global team of ethicists to examine the ethical applications of bio-computing.

    Bio-computing, once a concept confined to science fiction, is now a reality. As such, it’s crucial to begin contemplating its ethical research and application, according to a global assembly of specialists.

    The creators of DishBrain have collaborated with bioethicists and medical scientists to outline a comprehensive framework. Their insights and recommendations on addressing this emerging field can be found in a recently published article in Biotechnology Advances.

    “Combining biological neural systems with silicon substrates to produce intelligence-like behavior has significant promise, but we need to proceed with the bigger picture in mind to ensure sustainable progress,” says lead author Dr. Brett Kagan, Chief Scientific Officer of biotech start-up Cortical Lab. The group was made famous by their development of DishBrain – a collection of 800,000 living brain cells in a dish that learned to play Pong.

    ...

    The researchers point out that it is worth working through these moral issues, as the potential impact of bio-computing is significant.
    “Silicon-based computing is massively energy-hungry with a supercomputer consuming millions of watts of energy. By contrast, the human brain uses as little as 20 watts of energy – biological intelligences will show similar energy efficiency,” says Dr Kagan.

    “As it stands, the IT industry is a massive contributor to carbon emissions. If even a relatively small number of processing tasks could be done with bio-computers, there is a compelling environmental reason to explore these alternatives.”

    https://scitechdaily.com/from-sci-fi...AcO8FyrhftdVKs

    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  11. #1011
    Big discovery in those recovered asteroid samples ...

    Building Blocks of Life? NASA Reveals 4.5-Billion-Year-Old Asteroid Bennu Sample

    Initial studies of the 4.5-billion-year-old asteroid Bennu sample collected in space and brought to Earth by NASA show evidence of high-carbon content and water, which together could indicate the building blocks of life on Earth may be found in the rock.

    BELOW: A view of the outside of the OSIRIS-REx sample collector. Sample material from asteroid Bennu can be seen on the middle right.


    https://scitechdaily.com/building-bl...-bennu-sample/
    Diamond Sutra ...

    So you should view this fleeting world --
    A star at dawn, a bubble in a stream ...

    Supernova Bubble Captured in Hubble Time-Lapse Movie – 20,000-Year-Old Explosion Still Expanding at 500,000 MPH

    A blink between Hubble images taken in 2001 (with Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 (WFPC2)) and 2020 (with Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3)) shows gossamer filaments of glowing hydrogen in orange and cooling ionized oxygen in blue. The hydrogen filaments resemble lines in a wrinkled bedsheet seen from the side. The wrinkles arise as the shock wave encounters more or less dense material in the interstellar medium. Analyzing the shock wave’s location, astronomers found that the filaments have not slowed down at all in the last 20 years of Hubble observations, and they haven’t changed shape. The material is speeding into interstellar space at over half a million miles per hour—fast enough to travel from Earth to the Moon in less than half an hour. The shock wave is moving toward the top of these images.


    https://scitechdaily.com/supernova-b...at-500000-mph/
    I like Gaga in 'A Star is Born' more than Streisand, but the classic is Judy Garland ...

    NASA’s Webb Reveals Breathtaking Glimpse of Star Birth in Ethereal Depths

    This video compares images of star-forming region NGC 346 taken in visible light with the Hubble Space Telescope’s ACS instrument, near-infrared with the James Webb Space Telescope’s NIRCam instrument, and mid-infrared with Webb’s MIRI instrument. Hubble’s visible-light image is filled with thousands of stars, as well as curtains of hydrogen and oxygen gas colored blue. In Webb’s near-infrared image, pink represents energized hydrogen, while orange represents dense, molecular hydrogen. Webb’s mid-infrared image highlights bright patches of star formation, diffuse pink emission from warm dust, and blue filaments of dusty and sooty material. ... The field of view shown in this image is approximately 150 light-years across. ...


    https://scitechdaily.com/nasas-webb-...hereal-depths/
    A speedy subaru ...

    Revolutionary “New Lens” Into the Universe’s Most Energetic Particles

    Scientists from Osaka Metropolitan University have harnessed the Subaru Telescope to observe cosmic-ray showers with unprecedented clarity. This new method could lead to profound discoveries about the Universe, including insights into dark matter. ...

    ... When a high-energy cosmic ray collides with the Earth’s atmosphere, it generates an enormous number of particles known as an extensive air shower. ...

    BELOW: An example of a cosmic-ray extensive air shower recorded by the Subaru Telescope. The highlighted tracks, which are mostly aligned in similar directions, show the shower particles induced from a high-energy cosmic ray.

    https://scitechdaily.com/revolutiona...tic-particles/
    From vast space to smallest time ...

    Understanding Attoseconds: The Tiny Time Scale Behind Nobel Prize-Winning Research

    The 2023 Nobel Prize in physics recognized three researchers for their work with attosecond light pulses, revolutionizing the study of rapid electron movements and broadening understanding in various fields of physics and chemistry.

    “Atto” is the scientific notation prefix that represents 10-18, which is a decimal point followed by 17 zeroes and a 1. So a flash of light lasting an attosecond, or 0.000000000000000001 of a second, is an extremely short pulse of light.

    In fact, there are approximately as many attoseconds in one second as there are seconds in the age of the universe.

    https://scitechdaily.com/understandi...ning-research/
    So very slow, compared to an attosecond ...

    One-Millionth of One-Millionth of a Second – Scientists View the “Transition State” of a Photochemical Reaction in Real-Time

    Scientists used ultrafast electron diffraction to image the structure of the pericyclic minimum, the “transition state” of electrocyclic reactions.

    In chemical reactions, molecules proceed during their transformation from reactants into reaction products through a critical geometry. In chemistry, geometry refers to the arrangement of atoms in a molecule. Scientists often call critical geometry in reactions a transition state. This state has an almost incomprehensibly short lifetime of less than one-millionth of one-millionth of a second.

    BELOW: Artist’s illustration of the observed photochemical “transition state” structure (center).


    https://scitechdaily.com/one-million...-in-real-time/
    Lost plate found ...

    Surprising Tectonic Discovery: Geologist Unexpectedly Finds Remnants of a Lost Mega-Plate

    A geologist has successfully reconstructed a previously unknown tectonic plate named Pontus, once approximately one-fourth the size of the Pacific Ocean. This discovery was made through field research in various regions, including Japan, Borneo, and the Philippines.

    Some amazing medical stories ...

    It is said that this little girl will be largely fine, leading a very normal life ...

    Doctors disconnect half of SoCal 6-year-old's brain

    A 6-year-old girl with a rare neurological disease recently underwent life-saving surgery that disconnected half of her brain.

    https://us.cnn.com/videos/health/202...orig-mc-gr.cnn

    ALSO:

    A monkey pig or a pig monkey ... a ponkey kidney ...

    Gene-edited pig kidney keeps monkey alive for 2 years, trial finds, a step toward longer-lasting human transplants

    The scientists genetically modified the pigs so their kidneys could be transferred to another species and to improve the chances that the organs wouldn’t be rejected. Even when a human donates an organ to another human, the recipient has to take drugs to suppress their immune system for the rest of their lives so their body does not reject the donor organ.

    With previous pig-to-primate donation experiments, even those involving genetically modified pigs, scientists had to use a significant number of immunosuppressant drugs, meaning the experiments would not be translatable to a human organ donation experiment, researchers said. But with this trial, the genetic modifications were effective enough that they needed only about as much medicine as a human could tolerate.

    The team transplanted pig kidneys into more than 20 monkeys, although not all of the pigs had all of the gene edits.

    None of the monkeys that got kidneys from the pigs without the seven human genes survived more than 50 days. The monkeys that got the full combination lived a lot longer: Five lived for more than a year, and one lived for more than two. Tests showed that the single donated kidney seemed to perform as well as two natural kidneys.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/12/health...scn/index.html
    Problems for AI to solve ...

    Shaking Up Predictions: Deep Learning Revolutionizes Earthquake Forecasts

    Scientists have developed a deep learning model, RECAST, to forecast earthquake aftershocks. This model demonstrates superior adaptability and scalability compared to the existing ETAS model, especially with larger seismological datasets. The model could lead to improved forecasts, even in areas with limited data, by leveraging information from multiple global regions.

    https://scitechdaily.com/shaking-up-...ake-forecasts/
    EVEscape: The AI Revolution in Forecasting Viral Variants Before They Emerge

    New AI tool called EVEscape uses evolutionary and biological information to predict how a virus could change to escape the immune system. The tool successfully predicted the most concerning new variants that occurred during the COVID-19 pandemic. Researchers say the tool can help inform the development of vaccines and therapies for SARS-CoV-2 and other rapidly mutating viruses.

    https://scitechdaily.com/evescape-th...e-they-emerge/
    New proteins, better batteries: Scientists are using AI to speed up discoveries

    On Thursday, the U.S. National Academies convened a two-day meeting on the potential for AI to change science. "AI scientists can really be more systematic, more comprehensive and not make errors," says Yolanda Gil, director of AI and data science initiatives at the Information Sciences Institute at the University of Southern California, who is attending the event.

    Rather than using AI to do all science, she envisions a future in which AI systems plan and execute experiments, in collaboration with their human counterparts. In a world facing increasingly complex technical challenges, "there's not enough humans to do all this work," she says.

    https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...ns-drugs-solar
    AI-Powered Lasers: A Modern Solution to Space Debris

    Hang Woon Lee, director of the Space Systems Operations Research Laboratory at WVU, said a junkyard of human-made debris, including defunct satellites, is accumulating around Earth. The more debris in orbit, the higher the risk that some of that debris will collide with manned and unmanned space assets. He said he believes the best chance for preventing those collisions is an array of multiple lasers mounted to platforms in space. The artificial intelligence-powered lasers could maneuver and work together to respond rapidly to debris of any size.


    https://scitechdaily.com/ai-powered-...-space-debris/
    Some AI problems ...

    Jevons’ Paradox: AI Could Use As Much Electricity As Entire Countries

    Generative AI models, like OpenAI’s ChatGPT, consume large amounts of energy during training and operational use. While global efforts are underway to improve AI’s energy efficiency, the increased efficiency might inadvertently boost demand due to Jevons’ Paradox. Given current projections, AI’s electricity consumption could rival that of entire nations by 2027. The researchers stress the importance of mindful AI application due to its energy-intensive nature. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/jevons-para...ire-countries/
    Some AI problems solved ...

    AI Game-Changer: Nanoelectronic Devices Uses 100x Less Energy

    Northwestern University’s new nanoelectronic device offers energy-efficient, real-time AI tasks without relying on the cloud. Ideal for wearables, it processes data instantly and diagnosed heart conditions with 95% accuracy in tests. This innovation promises faster, efficient, and private health monitoring.

    ... With its tiny footprint, ultra-low power consumption, and lack of lag time to receive analyses, the device is ideal for direct incorporation into wearable electronics (like smartwatches and fitness trackers) for real-time data processing and near-instant diagnostics.

    “Today, most sensors collect data and then send it to the cloud, where the analysis occurs on energy-hungry servers before the results are finally sent back to the user,” said Northwestern’s Mark C. Hersam, the study’s senior author. “This approach is incredibly expensive, consumes significant energy and adds a time delay. Our device is so energy efficient that it can be deployed directly in wearable electronics for real-time detection and data processing, enabling more rapid intervention for health emergencies.”

    https://scitechdaily.com/ai-game-cha...x-less-energy/
    Empathizing with empathetic AI ...

    AI Empathy: Is It Technology or Just Our Perceptions?

    Study shows users can be primed to believe certain things about an AI chatbot’s motives, which influences their interactions with the chatbot. ... Researchers from MIT and Arizona State University found that priming users — by telling them that a conversational AI agent for mental health support was either empathetic, neutral, or manipulative — influenced their perception of the chatbot and shaped how they communicated with it, even though they were speaking to the exact same chatbot. ... Most users who were told the AI agent was caring believed that it was, and they also gave it higher performance ratings than those who believed it was manipulative. At the same time, less than half of the users who were told the agent had manipulative motives thought the chatbot was actually malicious, indicating that people may try to “see the good” in AI the same way they do in their fellow humans.

    https://scitechdaily.com/ai-empathy-...r-perceptions/
    crAIvings ...

    Emotional Bytes: Can AI Crave a Favorite Food?

    Penn State researchers are developing an electronic tongue that simulates the human process of gustation, which could influence AI to make decisions more like humans. This innovation is part of an effort to incorporate the emotional intelligence aspect, often overlooked in AI research. This electronic gustatory system can currently detect all five primary tastes and has numerous potential applications, from AI-driven diets to personalized restaurant offerings. ... Electronic tongue’ holds promise as possible first step to artificial emotional intelligence.

    https://scitechdaily.com/emotional-b...favorite-food/
    AI has feelings ... but trees don't ...

    Scientists Debunk the Myth: Do Trees Really Have Feelings?

    Researchers scrutinized claims made in two popular books about trees having human-like traits and emotions. Published in Trends in Plant Science, their findings challenge many of these claims as unscientific. They caution against anthropomorphizing plants and highlight issues like the flawed “mother tree concept” and the dangers of making decisions based on appealing but inaccurate narratives, especially in the context of climate change adaptation.

    ... The researchers report that in those works, trees are attributed with human characteristics and behaviors, including the ability to feel pain and pleasure, to communicate with one another, and to act altruistically. ...

    ... Finally, the authors point out the fatal consequences such claims could have for the adaptation of forests to climate change if political decisions are “based on pleasant-sounding but false messages” rather than scientific fact, adds Robinson. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/scientists-...have-feelings/

    https://scitechdaily.com/scientists-...have-feelings/
    I don't know how practical this really is, but I want one!

    See Japanese 'ARCHAX' robot with $3 million price tag

    I want one of these too ...

    The blimp is back – and this time, it’s tiny

    South African startup Cloudline has received millions of dollars in investment for its mini blimps. Just over 18 meters (60 feet) long and with a miniscule net weight of two to three kilograms (around four to seven pounds), the company is pitching them as an alternative to helicopters and other vertical take-off and landing aircraft, and with payload capacities outstripping those of drones.

    Cloudline has already received approval from local authorities to begin flying its airships in South Africa and is in talks with partners in Namibia, Mozambique and Kenya to begin operations, says CEO Spencer Horne.

    The helium-filled blimps are fitted with solar panels and backup batteries to power their engines, have a flight time of up to 12 hours and a range of up to 400 kilometers (249 miles), flying at a height up to 1,220 meters (4,000 feet) above take-off level.

    Flight is fully autonomous, with each blimp following predetermined waypoints. In the event an airship encounters an abnormality, it will reroute to a predetermined point and wait for instruction from a human, who has access to its telemetry data.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/13/travel...ntl/index.html

    Genetics surprises ...

    Divergent DNA: The Accidental Discovery That’s Shaking Genetics

    Researchers found an unexpected genetic variation in a new protist species, challenging established understanding of DNA-to-protein translation and emphasizing the mysteries that nature still holds. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/divergent-d...king-genetics/
    Why fix what ain't broken?

    Darwin’s Dilemma: “Paradox of Stasis” Lizard Study Challenges the Rules of Evolutionary Biology

    By lassoing lizards, putting tiny chips on their legs, and tracking them for three years, Georgia Tech’s James Stroud revealed why species often appear unchanged for millions of years despite Charles Darwin’s theory of constant evolution. ...

    To his surprise, Stroud found that the stabilizing form of natural selection — that which maintains a species’ same, average features — was extremely rare. In fact, natural selection varied massively through time. Some years, lizards with longer legs would survive better, and other years, lizards with shorter legs fared better. For other times, there was no clear pattern at all. “The most fascinating result is that natural selection was extremely variable through time,” Stroud said. “We often saw that selection would completely flip in direction from one year to the next. When combined into a long-term pattern, however, all this variation effectively canceled itself out: Species remained remarkably similar across the entire time period.”

    https://scitechdaily.com/darwins-dil...onary-biology/
    People even lost their shoes back then ...

    'Prehistoric footwear' was discovered in Spanish cave by miners, scientists reveal in new study
    Some 20 pairs of sandals are said to be at least 6,200 years old


    What may have been the oldest pair of shoes in Europe were discovered in a cave in Spain and are now thought to be much older than scientists previously thought.

    About 20 pairs of the sandals are at least 6,200 years old — and possibly older — while other woven objects in the cave are dated back 9,500 years, according to a new study by scientists. The shoes measured around 20.5cm — or a little over 8 inches.

    The news emerged after scientists used carbon-dating on 76 objects from the Cueva de los Murciélagos, Albuñol, near Granada, that had been dug out by miners in the 19th century.


    https://www.foxnews.com/lifestyle/pr...entists-reveal
    Mr. Musk could fall on your head ...

    SpaceX fires back at FAA report suggesting its Starlink internet constellation could be deadly

    The 35-page analysis, compiled in part by the nonprofit research group The Aerospace Corporation, offers a dire picture of the potential dangers associated with large networks of satellites such as Starlink, suggesting that by 2035, “if the expected large constellation growth is realized and debris from Starlink satellites survive reentry … one person on the planet would be expected to be injured or killed every two years.”

    It also estimates that the probability of an aircraft being downed by a collision with falling space debris could be 0.0007 per year by 2035.



    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/10/world/...scn/index.html
    Gassho, J

    satLAH
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  12. #1012
    Slower than the post office ... but fast as light ...

    8 billion-year-old radio signal reaches Earth


    Astronomers have detected a mysterious blast of radio waves that have taken 8 billion years to reach Earth. The fast radio burst is one of the most distant and energetic ever observed. ... The burst, named FRB 20220610A, lasted less than a millisecond, but in that fraction of a moment, it released the equivalent of our sun’s energetic emissions over the course of 30 years, according to a study published Thursday in the journal Science.

    ... “Using ASKAP’s array of (radio) dishes, we were able to determine precisely where the burst came from,” ... The research team traced the burst to what appears to be a group of two or three galaxies that are in the process of merging, interacting and forming new stars. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/19/world/...scn/index.html
    Funny, you don't look very neanderthal ...

    Why do some groups of people today have more Neanderthal DNA than others? A new study offers answers

    Most humans alive today can trace a very small percentage of their DNA to Neanderthals — a result of prehistoric sexual encounters between our ancestors and the now-extinct Stone Age hominins before the latter disappeared around 40,000 years ago.

    However, Neanderthal DNA is slightly more abundant in the genomes of East Asian populations.

    This discrepancy has long perplexed scientists because Neanderthal remains have been found extensively across Europe and the Middle East but not further east of the Altai Mountains in Central Asia. “So what’s puzzling is that an area where we’ve never found any Neanderthal remains, there’s more Neanderthal DNA,” said study coauthor Mathias Currat, a senior lecturer of genetics and evolution at the University of Geneva.

    On average, Neanderthal DNA accounts for about 2% of the genetic makeup of people in Eurasia, while in East Asia the proportion can be as high as 4%, Currat said.

    Currat and his colleagues at the University of Geneva came up with an explanation for this inconsistency by analyzing the distribution of the DNA inherited from Neanderthals in the genomes of humans over the past 40,000 years. The researchers found that, over time, the distribution of Neanderthal DNA didn’t always look as it does now. ... The study team thereby concluded that the current pattern of a higher percentage of Neanderthal ancestry in Asian populations compared with those in Europe must have developed at a later stage, mostly likely during the Neolithic transition when farming began to replace hunting and gathering as a way of life some 10,000 to 5,000 years ago. At this point in time, the first farmers from Anatolia, in what’s now western Turkey and the Aegean, began to mix with the existing hunter-gatherers in Western and Northern Europe. This resulted in a lower proportion of Neanderthal DNA observed in European genomes during this period.

    “The thing was that they had less Neanderthal ancestry so they diluted the (Neanderthal ancestry) in European populations,” Currat said.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/18/world/...scn/index.html
    But they were smarter than one might think ...

    20-Year Study Reveals: Neanderthals Were As Intelligent as Homo sapiens

    Neanderthals knew how to control fire and used it to cook food. Researchers have learned about their habits and diet from the traces found near hearths. Angelucci: “More than different species, I would speak of different human forms.” ... Neanderthals were capable of symbolic thought, could create artistic objects, knew how to decorate their bodies using personal ornaments, and had an extremely varied diet. Add to that that, based on our findings, we can say with certainty that they habitually ate cooked food. This ability confirms that they were as skilled as the sapiens who lived millennia later.” ... The oldest layers of the Gruta de Oliveira, which includes a number of passages, date back to about 120,000 years ago, the most recent to about 40,000: it is believed that Neanderthals inhabited this place between 100,000 and 70,000 years ago. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/20-year-stu...-homo-sapiens/
    Neanderthals couldn't do this with their brains ...

    Decoding the Human Brain: Detailed Cell Maps Pave Way for Next-Gen Therapies

    Researchers have mapped the genetic and cellular makeup of human and nonhuman primate brains, providing deeper insights into brain functions and potential treatments for disorders.

    https://scitechdaily.com/decoding-th...gen-therapies/
    Decoding Humanity: The 3,000+ Brain Cell Types Revealing Our Secrets

    Researchers, through a massive collaboration supported by the BRAIN Initiative, unveil detailed studies on human and primate brain cellular structures, identifying over 3,000 distinct brain cells and contributing to the expansive Human Cell Atlas project.
    Scientists built the largest-ever map of the human brain. Here's what they found

    https://www.npr.org/sections/health-...-schizophrenia

    Decoding Complexity: MIT’s Insight Into Individual Neurons and Behavior

    MIT researchers studied a single neuron in the C. elegans worm, discovering its role in regulating multiple behaviors. This neuron utilizes various neurotransmitters and can “borrow” serotonin, potentially providing insights into psychiatric treatments in more complex organisms. ... “Our results reveal how a single neuron can influence a broad suite of behaviors over multiple timescales and show that neurons can ‘borrow’ serotonin from one another to control behavior,” the researchers report in Current Biology. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/decoding-co...-and-behavior/
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  13. #1013
    I have always been proud of my 3% Neanderthal lineage, I am also proud of my Devonian ancestors (though I don’t know much about them). This reveal may explain things about me to my Sangha family

    Doshin
    Stlah

  14. #1014
    Quote Originally Posted by Doshin View Post
    I have always been proud of my 3% Neanderthal lineage ...
    I would have guessed something closer to 30%, but okay.

    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  15. #1015
    A few more science stories from this week (I feel asleep posting em last night) ...

    AI need never fall asleep ...

    From AI Black Boxes to Physics: The New Frontier of Protein Folding Prediction

    The University of Tokyo’s new protein folding model, WSME-L, offers enhanced predictions over traditional models. This breakthrough can impact medical research, including studying Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, and help in designing functional proteins for medical and industrial uses. ... Proteins are important molecules that perform a variety of functions essential to life. To function properly, many proteins must fold into specific structures. However, the way proteins fold into specific structures is still largely unknown. ... By knowing more about this folding process, researchers can better understand more about the processes that constitute life itself. Such knowledge is also essential to medicine, not only for the development of new treatments and industrial processes to produce medicines, but also for knowledge of how certain diseases work, as some are examples of protein folding gone wrong. So, to say proteins are important is putting it mildly. Proteins are the stuff of life.

    https://scitechdaily.com/from-ai-bla...ng-prediction/
    Japan police to stamp out online criminal activity with help of AI

    Japanese police said Thursday they will introduce artificial intelligence technology to identify social media posts in which people are recruited to commit crimes like robbery and fraud.

    Starting Friday, the National Police Agency will use AI to look for posts promising large payments for "yami baito," an expression implying shadowy illegal work, coupled with wordings that solicit people to conduct other more specific criminal acts such as transporting or receiving money obtained via fraudulent means. ... Using natural language processing technology, the AI will not only look for specific keywords but also identify posts suspected to contain harmful information based on context, the agency said.

    For the time being, X, formerly called Twitter, and introduction posts and comments on YouTube videos will be targeted for enhanced surveillance, it said.

    The center will report the data it collects to another outside organization, the Internet Hotline Center, which can request website operators and internet service providers delete posts it determines to be illegal or harmful.

    https://mainichi.jp/english/articles...0m/0na/025000c
    MIT’s New Generative AI Outperforms Diffusion Models in Image Generation

    ... Since its inception, the “Poisson Flow Generative Model ++” (PFGM++) has found potential applications in various fields, from antibody and RNA sequence generation to audio production and graph generation. The model can generate complex patterns, like creating realistic images or mimicking real-world processes. PFGM++ builds off of PFGM, the team’s work from the prior year. PFGM takes inspiration from the means behind the mathematical equation known as the “Poisson” equation, and then applies it to the data the model tries to learn from. To do this, the team used a clever trick: They added an extra dimension to their model’s “space,” kind of like going from a 2D sketch to a 3D model. This extra dimension gives more room for maneuvering, places the data in a larger context, and helps one approach the data from all directions when generating new samples. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/mits-new-ge...ge-generation/
    Nature Meets Tech: How Ecological Principles Could Reinvent AI

    Researchers propose a synergy between AI and ecology, believing that ecology can inspire more resilient AI and that AI can address global ecological challenges. ...

    Contemporary artificial intelligence platforms often draw inspiration from the human brain’s structure and functionality. In a recent study, experts propose that looking towards ecology, another realm of biology, could pave the way for AI systems that are powerful, resilient, and socially responsible. ... “Compared to other statistical models, AI can incorporate greater amounts of data and a diversity of data sources, and that might help us discover new interactions and drivers that we may not have thought were important,” said LaDeau. “There is a lot of promise for developing AI to better capture more types of data, like the socio-cultural insights that are really hard to boil down to a number.” ...

    Artificial intelligence systems are notoriously fragile, with potentially devastating consequences, such as misdiagnosing cancer or causing a car crash. The incredible resilience of ecological systems could inspire more robust and adaptable AI architectures, the authors argue. In particular, Varshney said that ecological knowledge could help to solve the problem of mode collapse in artificial neural networks, the AI systems that often power speech recognition, computer vision, and more.

    “Mode collapse is when you’re training an artificial neural network on something, and then you train it on something else and it forgets the first thing that it was trained on,” he explained. “By better understanding why mode collapse does or doesn’t happen in natural systems, we may learn how to make it not happen in AI.”

    Inspired by ecological systems, a more robust AI might include feedback loops, redundant pathways, and decision-making frameworks. These flexibility upgrades could also contribute to a more ‘general intelligence’ for AIs that could enable reasoning and connection-making beyond the specific data that the algorithm was trained on. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/nature-meet...d-reinvent-ai/
    And AI may take a leap ...

    Light Speed Ahead: 3D Photonic-Electronic Hardware Revolutionizes AI

    Researchers have developed an integrated photonic-electronic hardware capable of processing 3D data. This innovation significantly improves data processing parallelism for AI tasks.

    • A breakthrough development in photonic-electronic hardware could significantly boost processing power for AI and machine learning applications.
    • The approach uses multiple radio frequencies to encode data, enabling multiple calculations to be carried out in parallel.
    • The method shows promise for outperforming state-of-the-art electronic processors, with further enhancements possible.
    2D to 3D ...

    Hologram Breakthrough – New Technology Transforms Ordinary 2D Images

    Researchers have developed a novel deep-learning method that simplifies the creation of holograms, allowing 3D images to be generated directly from 2D photos captured with standard cameras. This technique, involving a sequence of three deep neural networks, not only streamlines the hologram generation process but also outperforms current high-end graphics processing units in speed. It doesn’t require expensive equipment like RGB-D cameras after the training phase, making it cost-effective. With potential applications in high-fidelity 3D displays and in-vehicle holographic systems, this innovation marks a significant advancement in holographic technology.
    In other news, not about AI ... although I bet AI is involved somehow ...

    Teleportation ... not quite ready for Star Trek though ...

    Quantum Breakthrough: Record-Breaking Quantum Teleportation Achieved Over Metropolitan Range

    Quantum teleportation enables the transfer of quantum information to distant locations through the use of quantum entanglement and classical communication. This concept has been realized in various quantum light systems, ranging from laboratory-based experiments to practical real-world tests. Notably, by utilizing the low-Earth orbit Micius satellite, scientists have successfully teleported quantum information over distances exceeding 1200 km. However, there hasn’t been a quantum teleportation system yet whose rate can reach the order of Hertz. This hinders future applications of the quantum internet. ...

    [Now] In a paper published in Light Science & Application, a team of scientists, led by Prof. Guangcan Guo and Prof. Qiang Zhou from the University of Electronic Science and Technology of China (UESTC) cooperating with Prof. Lixing You from the Shanghai Institute of Microsystem and Information Technology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences, have improved the teleportation rate to 7.1 qubits per second for the first time based on the “No. 1 Metropolitan Quantum Internet of UESTC”.

    https://scitechdaily.com/quantum-bre...politan-range/
    I thought that we fixed the ozone hole when we gave up on hairspray ...

    Ozone Hole Swells to 10 Million Square Miles – One of the Biggest on Record

    Measurements from the Copernicus Sentinel-5P satellite show that this year’s ozone hole over Antarctica is one of the biggest on record. The hole, which is what scientists call an ‘ozone depleting area,’ reached a size of 26 million sq km (10 million sq miles) on September 16, 2023. This is roughly three times the size of Brazil. ... The size of the ozone hole fluctuates on a regular basis. From August to October, the ozone hole increases in size – reaching a maximum between mid-September and mid-October. When temperatures high up in the stratosphere start to rise in the southern hemisphere, the ozone depletion slows, the polar vortex weakens and finally breaks down, and by the end of December, ozone levels return to normal. ...

    BELOW: animation uses Sentinel-5P total ozone measurements and shows the evolution of the ozone hole over the South Pole from September 1 to September 29, 2023.


    https://scitechdaily.com/ozone-hole-...est-on-record/
    This is one of the few stories this week that I can get a grip on ...

    Revolutionizing Prosthetics – Scientists Develop Bionic Hand That Merges With User’s Nervous and Skeletal Systems

    A woman who lost her arm in a farming accident and experienced phantom limb pain, received a groundbreaking bionic prosthesis that integrates with her skeleton and nervous system, significantly improving her quality of life. ... In addition to her intractable pain, she found that conventional prostheses were uncomfortable and unreliable, and thus of little help in daily life. All this changed when she received groundbreaking bionic technology that allowed her to wear a much more functional prosthesis comfortably all day. The higher integration of between the bionic and Karin’s residual limb also relieved her pain. ...

    ... human-machine interface that allows for the prosthesis to be comfortably attached to the user’s skeleton via osseointegration, while also enabling electrical connection with the nervous system via electrodes implanted in nerves and muscles. ... The robotic hand developed by Prensilia, namely Mia Hand, featured unique motor and sensory components that allowed the user to carry out 80% of the activities of daily living ...


    https://scitechdaily.com/revolutioni...letal-systems/
    He's rich, and wants to live forever ... but it might be more fun to use the money other ways??

    Tech billionaire on journey to immortality says there is a ‘low probability’ humans will survive without AI

    Johnson's health regimen includes a strict bedtime, collecting stool samples and a device to monitor erections


    ... Bryan Johnson, a 46-year-old tech entrepreneur, spends millions yearly on a team of experts monitoring his health and conducting experiments. The goal: Get his organs to look and act like that of an 18-year-old.

    Some of his regiments include a strict bedtime of 8:30 p.m., taking 111 pills daily, collecting his stool samples, and having a small device attached to his penis to monitor nighttime erections. ... Johnson admits that achieving his health goals requires a lot of nuance and detail. However, most of these measures can be boiled down to a few small achievable mantras: Going to bed on time, exercising every day and avoiding things that cause harm.

    "I joke in that I am a rights activist where I liberated my organs from the tyranny in my mind," Johnson said with a grin. "I can say that with tongue in cheek. It's kind of funny, but you think about it, and it's like, for entire life, my mind got exactly what it wanted, and my heart never did, nor did my lungs and nor did my kidney." ...

    Jundo: He does look good. Here he is (can you tell which is him, which his son)?


    https://www.foxnews.com/media/tech-b...ive-without-ai
    (to be continued ) ...
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  16. #1016
    Are we living in a simulation? Is Elon Musk a simulation?

    Is Our Reality a Computer Simulation? A New Law of Physics Could Prove Elon Musk Is Right

    ... A University of Portsmouth physicist has explored whether a new law of physics could support the much-debated theory that we are simply characters in an advanced virtual world.

    The simulated universe hypothesis proposes that what humans experience is actually an artificial reality, much like a computer simulation, in which they themselves are constructs.

    The theory is popular among a number of well-known figures including Elon Musk, and within a branch of science known as information physics, which suggests physical reality is fundamentally made up of bits of information. ...

    ... In 2022, he discovered a new law of physics that could predict genetic mutations in organisms, including viruses, and help judge their potential consequences.

    It is based on the second law of thermodynamics, which establishes that entropy – a measure of disorder in an isolated system – can only increase or stay the same.

    Dr. Vopson had expected that the entropy in information systems would also increase over time, but on examining the evolution of these systems he realized it remains constant or decreases. That’s when he established the second law of information dynamics, or infodynamics, which could significantly impact genetics research and evolution theory. ... A new paper, published on October 6 in AIP Advances, examines the scientific implications of the new law on a number of other physical systems and environments, including biological, atomic physics, and cosmology. ... Key findings include:

    Biological
    • Systems: The second law of infodynamics challenges the conventional understanding of genetic mutations, suggesting that they follow a pattern governed by information entropy. This discovery has profound implications for fields such as genetic research, evolutionary biology, genetic therapies, pharmacology, virology, and pandemic monitoring.
    • Atomic Physics: The paper explains the behavior of electrons in multi-electron atoms, providing insights into phenomena like Hund’s rule; which states that the term with maximum multiplicity lies lowest in energy. Electrons arrange themselves in a way that minimizes their information entropy, shedding light on atomic physics and stability of chemicals.
    • Cosmology: The second law of infodynamics is shown to be a cosmological necessity, with thermodynamic considerations applied to an adiabatically expanding universe supporting its validity.


    “The paper also provides an explanation for the prevalence of symmetry in the universe,” explained Dr. Vopson.

    “Symmetry principles play an important role with respect to the laws of nature, but until now there has been little explanation as to why that could be. My findings demonstrate that high symmetry corresponds to the lowest information entropy state, potentially explaining nature’s inclination towards it. ...

    ... Dr. Vopson’s previous research suggests that information is the fundamental building block of the universe and has physical mass. He even claims that information could be the elusive dark matter that makes up almost a third of the universe, which he calls the mass-energy-information equivalence principle. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/is-our-real...musk-is-right/

    HIS PAPER: https://pubs.aip.org/aip/adv/article...namics-and-its
    Gassho, Jundo

    stLAH
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  17. #1017
    Can you spot where you are on the map?

    From Big Bang to Big Picture: A Comprehensive New View of All Objects in the Universe

    Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) have developed the most comprehensive view of the universe’s history. The study highlights the transformation of the universe from its inception 13.8 billion years ago to its current state, filled with objects like protons, atoms, and galaxies.

    [They suggest that] it may have originated from an “instanton” rather than a singularity. This revelation, visualized through two innovative plots, also delves into the mysteries of the universe’s boundaries. ...

    ... To show this process in the simplest possible way, the researchers made two plots. The first shows the temperature and density of the universe as it expanded and cooled. The second plots the mass and size of all objects in the universe.

    The result is the most comprehensive chart ever created of all the objects in the universe. ... “Parts of this plot are ‘forbidden’ – where objects cannot be denser than black holes, or are so small, quantum mechanics blurs the very nature of what it really means to be a singular object.” Mr. Patel said. ... The researchers also emphasize that the plot boundaries and what potentially lies beyond them remain a major mystery.

    “At the smaller end, the place where quantum mechanics and general relativity meet is the smallest possible object – an instanton. This plot suggests the universe may have started as an instanton, which has a specific size and mass, rather than a singularity, which is a hypothetical point of infinite density and temperature,” Mr. Patel said.

    “On the larger end, the plot suggests that if there were nothing – a complete vacuum – beyond the observable universe, our universe would be a large, low density black hole. This is a little scary, but we have good reason to believe that’s not the case.”


    https://scitechdaily.com/from-big-ba...-the-universe/
    A oceanic exoplanet discovery, long anticipated ... hydrogen carbon and methane (but no ammonia), possible signs of an ocean ... and maybe signs of life ...

    'Huge deal': Lead scientist explains new exoplanet discovery

    A planet 120 light-years away from Earth appears to have chemicals that could indicate the presence of life. Lead author professor Nikku Madhusudhan from the University of Cambridge joins CNN to explain the study.

    https://us.cnn.com/videos/world/2023...cnni-world.cnn

    and

    This is heavy, man ...

    Cosmic Collision: Life-Essential Elements Forged in Massive Space Explosion

    In one of the most luminous gamma-ray bursts observed, scientists detected the creation of rare chemical elements following a neutron star merger named GRB 230307A. Using various telescopes, including NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope, researchers identified the presence of heavy chemical elements, such as tellurium. This discovery offers insights into the synthesis of heavy elements essential for life and challenges previous assumptions about gamma-ray bursts’ durations. Future research will focus on understanding these mergers more deeply and their elemental implications for the universe.

    https://scitechdaily.com/cosmic-coll...ace-explosion/

    The explosion, observed on March 7, was the second brightest gamma-ray burst ever witnessed by telescopes in more than 50 years of observations, over one million times brighter than the entire Milky Way Galaxy combined. ... This particular burst, called GRB 230307A, was likely created when two neutron stars — the incredibly dense remnants of stars after a supernova — merged in a galaxy about one billion light-years away. In addition to releasing the gamma-ray burst, the merger created a kilonova, a rare explosion that occurs when a neutron star merges with another neutron star or a black hole, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

    ... Astronomers have long believed that neutron star mergers are the celestial factories that create rare elements heavier than iron. But it’s been difficult to track down the evidence. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/25/world/...scn/index.html
    Billions of Years Burst ...

    Galactic Flashbacks: 8 Billion-Year-Old Radio Burst Unlocks Universal Secrets

    Astronomers have identified the oldest and most distant fast radio burst (FRB) yet, about eight billion years old, supporting theories on FRBs and their ability to reveal “missing” matter between galaxies. This discovery promises more insights into the Universe’s structure with future telescopic advancements. ... The source of the burst was shown to be a group of two or three galaxies that are merging, supporting current theories on the cause of fast radio bursts. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/galactic-fl...ersal-secrets/
    The moon is no kid ...

    Lunar dust collected by Apollo 17 astronauts in the 1970s has revealed that the moon is 40 million years older than previously believed.

    ... A new analysis of that sample detected zircon crystals and dated them to 4.46 billion years old. Previous estimates put the moon, formed by a massive celestial collision, at 4.425 billion years old. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/23/world/...scn/index.html
    Earth is leaking ...

    Earth’s core is leaking, scientists say

    Scientists have detected a surprising amount of a rare version of helium, called helium-3, in volcanic rocks on Canada’s Baffin Island, lending support to the theory that the noble gas is leaking from Earth’s core — and has been for millennia. ... Helium leaking from Earth’s core doesn’t affect our planet or have any negative implications, he said. The noble gas does not chemically react with matter, so it won’t have an impact on humanity or the environment.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/27/world/...scn/index.html
    A better map of the brain too ... Can you spot where you are on the map?

    First Single-Cell “Atlas” of the Human Brain Reveals Inner Workings an Unprecedented Level

    A global collaboration has created the world’s most comprehensive primate brain atlas with 4.2 million cells, unveiling region-specific functionalities and associations with neurological diseases, paving the way for future brain research and disease interventions. ... A longstanding mystery in science is how the over 100 million individual neurons work together to form a network that forms the basis of who we are – every human thought, emotion, and behavior. ...

    ... From the gene expression profiles, they were able to identify hundreds of molecularly distinct brain cell types. They also found that cell composition differed extensively across the brain, revealing cellular signatures of region-specific functions, from the neurotransmitters involved in brain cell communication to support cells that help feed and protect the brain from diseases like Alzheimer’s. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/first-singl...edented-level/
    CRISPR gets crispier too ...

    Redefining Gene Therapy: CRISPR’s Innovative “Find-and-Replace” Genome Editing

    Genome editing, specifically the CRISPR-Cas9 method, offers a revolutionary solution to Severe Combined Immunodeficiencies (SCIDs) and other genetic disorders. Bar-Ilan University researchers have enhanced this approach with their GE x HDR 2.0 strategy, aiming for precise gene replacement. ... “This groundbreaking technique, which involves replacing entire coding sequences or exons while retaining critical regulatory elements, brings hope to patients with RAG2-SCID and holds promise for the treatment of various other genetic disorders.” ...https://scitechdaily.com/redefining-...enome-editing/
    A modern model ...

    Breakthroughs in race to create lab models of human embryos raise hopes and concerns

    ... The embryo-like structures are essentially clumps of cells grown in a lab, which are smaller than a grain of rice and represent the very earliest stages of human development, before any organs have formed. They don’t have a beating heart or a brain.

    The most advanced models, revealed in September by an Israeli team that Hanna was part of, show all the cell types that are essential for an embryo’s development — the placenta, yolk sac, chorionic sac (outer membrane) and other tissues that an embryo needs to develop.

    The structures were left to develop for eight days — reaching a developmental stage equivalent to day 14 of a human embryo in the womb — an important moment when natural embryos acquire the internal structures that enable them to proceed to the next stage: developing the progenitors of body organs.

    Hanna said they were the most accurate models developed so far and, unlike those created by other teams, no genetic modification had been made to turn on the genes necessary to generate the different types of cells, only chemical nudges.

    “It’s not only you put the cells together, and they’re there,” he said. “But you see the architecture, you start also seeing very fine details,” Hanna said. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/26/health...scn/index.html
    Did I freely choose to make this post, do you freely choose to read it?

    Does Free Will Exist? New Study Challenges Classic Libet Experiments

    The results of Libet’s experiments have generated a lot of controversy about free will, and some neurophysiologists have even concluded that it does not exist. Moreover, Libet’s experiment has been repeated using functional magnetic resonance imaging, and it turns out that the decision of the subject can be predicted even 6-10 seconds before their conscious awareness of it. ... [But] Neuroscientists from HSE University have questioned the conclusions of famous studies ... Libet’s experiments in the 1970s and 1980s used EEG to show that brain activity indicating a decision occurred before individuals were consciously aware of their intention to act. The HSE team’s recent research suggests flaws in Libet’s measurement of intention awareness and asserts that the readiness potential doesn’t directly correlate with the decision itself. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/does-free-w...t-experiments/
    For really tiny hands ...

    Revolution in Nanotech: A Motor That’s 1/10,000th of a Millimeter

    An international team of scientists headed by the University of Bonn has developed a novel type of nanomotor. It is driven by a clever mechanism and can perform pulsing movements. The researchers are now planning to fit it with a coupling and install it as a drive in complex machines. ... This novel type of motor is similar to a hand grip trainer that strengthens your grip when used regularly. However, the motor is around one million times smaller. Two handles are connected by a spring in a V-shaped structure.

    https://scitechdaily.com/revolution-...-a-millimeter/

    Of course, AI keeps getting smarter ...

    The Future of Machine Learning: A New Breakthrough Technique

    Researchers have developed a technique called Meta-learning for Compositionality (MLC) that enhances the ability of artificial intelligence systems to make “compositional generalizations.” This ability, which allows humans to relate and combine concepts, has been a debated topic in the AI field for decades. Through a unique learning procedure, MLC showed performance comparable to, and at times surpassing, human capabilities in experiments. This breakthrough suggests that traditional neural networks can indeed be trained to mimic human-like systematic generalization.

    https://scitechdaily.com/the-future-...ugh-technique/
    Ancient faces ... modern problems ...

    Ancient face carvings exposed as Amazon water level drops to record lows

    Human faces sculpted into stone up to 2,000 years ago have appeared on a rocky outcropping along the Amazon River since water levels dropped to record lows in the region’s worst drought in more than a century.


    https://us.cnn.com/style/brazil-amaz...scn/index.html
    A big advance here in my home ... Ibaraki, Japan ...

    World's largest nuclear fusion experimental device successfully generates plasma for the first time

    The National Institute for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology, a national research and development agency, is using the world's largest nuclear fusion experimental device located in Naka City, Ibaraki Prefecture to create, for the first time, the state called "plasma" required to cause a nuclear fusion reaction. announced that it was successful.
    Full-scale experiments will begin toward the realization of a technology that is expected to become a next-generation energy source.
    https://www3.nhk.or.jp/lnews/mito/20...070022595.html
    Has a missing law of evolution been found??

    A new “law of increasing functional information” reveals that complex natural systems, beyond just life on Earth, evolve towards higher complexity. This discovery expands traditional evolutionary theory, offering insights from cosmology to astrobiology.

    ... In essence, the new law states that complex natural systems evolve to states of greater patterning, diversity, and complexity. In other words, evolution is not limited to life on Earth, it also occurs in other massively complex systems, from planets and stars to atoms, minerals, and more. ...

    ... In the case of stars, the paper notes that just two major elements – hydrogen and helium – formed the first stars shortly after the big bang. Those earliest stars used hydrogen and helium to make about 20 heavier chemical elements. And the next generation of stars built on that diversity to produce almost 100 more elements.

    “Charles Darwin eloquently articulated the way plants and animals evolve by natural selection, with many variations and traits of individuals and many different configurations,” says co-author Robert M. Hazen of Carnegie Science, a leader of the research.

    “We contend that Darwinian theory is just a very special, very important case within a far larger natural phenomenon. The notion that selection for function drives evolution applies equally to stars, atoms, minerals, and many other conceptually equivalent situations where many configurations are subjected to selective pressure.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/beyond-biol...-of-evolution/
    In any case, it may all be a simulated universe (I think such beliefs not incompatible with Buddhism, by the way) ...

    Redefining the Fabric of Reality: The Growing Evidence for a Simulated Universe

    The simulated universe theory proposes that our reality is a complex computer simulation, an idea echoed throughout history and popular culture. The second law of infodynamics, a concept introduced using information theory, suggests that information entropy must decrease or remain constant over time. This new law might provide evidence for the simulated universe theory, as it implies universal data optimization and compression, which are characteristics of a simulation. ... The simulated universe theory proposes that our reality is a complex computer simulation, an idea echoed throughout history and popular culture. The second law of infodynamics, a concept introduced using information theory, suggests that information entropy must decrease or remain constant over time. This new law might provide evidence for the simulated universe theory, as it implies universal data optimization and compression, which are characteristics of a simulation. ...

    ... it also indicates that genetic mutations are at the most fundamental level not just random events, as Darwin’s theory suggests. Instead, genetic mutations take place according to the second law of infodynamics, in such a way that the genome’s information entropy is always minimised. ...

    ... A super complex universe like ours, if it were a simulation, would require built-in data optimization and compression in order to reduce the computational power and the data storage requirements to run the simulation. This is exactly what we are observing all around us, including in digital data, biological systems, mathematical symmetries and the entire universe. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/redefining-...ated-universe/
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    Last edited by Jundo; 10-28-2023 at 08:00 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  18. #1018
    Rethinking reality ...

    Quantum Breakthrough: Scientists Rethink the Nature of Reality

    Quantum physicists from Hiroshima University have revealed that the results of quantum measurements are fundamentally tied to the interaction dynamics between the measuring device and the system, challenging traditional views of fixed physical properties and suggesting that reality is shaped by the context of these interactions. Their findings point to a need to rethink the interpretation of quantum experimental data.

    ... “Our results show that the physical reality of an object cannot be separated from the context of all its interactions with the environment, past, present, and future, providing strong evidence against the widespread belief that our world can be reduced to a mere configuration of material building blocks,” said Hofmann.

    https://scitechdaily.com/quantum-bre...re-of-reality/
    Organics on Jupiter's moon ... and they don't mean there's a health food store ...

    NASA’s Juno Mission Discovers Organics on Jupiter’s Giant Moon Ganymede

    NASA’s Juno mission has observed mineral salts and organic compounds on the surface of Jupiter’s moon Ganymede. ... Ganymede is the biggest of Jupiter’s moons and has long been of great interest to scientists due to the vast internal ocean of water hidden beneath its icy crust. ... “This suggests we are seeing the remnants of a deep ocean brine that reached the surface of this frozen world.”

    https://scitechdaily.com/nasas-juno-...moon-ganymede/
    You are standing atop Theia ...

    Scientists say they’ve finally found remnants of Theia, an ancient planet that collided with Earth to form the moon


    Scientists widely agree that an ancient planet likely smashed into Earth as it was forming billions of years ago, spewing debris that coalesced into the moon that decorates our night sky today.

    The theory, called the giant-impact hypothesis, explains many fundamental features of the moon and Earth.

    But one glaring mystery at the center of this hypothesis has endured: What ever happened to Theia? Direct evidence of its existence has remained elusive. No leftover fragments from the planet have been found in the solar system. And many scientists assumed any debris Theia left behind on Earth was blended in the fiery cauldron of our planet’s interior.

    A new theory, however, suggests that remnants of the ancient planet remain partially intact, buried beneath our feet.

    Molten slabs of Theia could have embedded themselves within Earth’s mantle after impact before solidifying, leaving portions of the ancient planet’s material resting above Earth’s core some 1,800 miles (about 2,900 kilometers) below the surface, according to a study published Wednesday in the journal Nature.

    ... They were already aware that there are two massive, distinct blobs that are embedded deep within the Earth. The masses — called large low-velocity provinces, or LLVPs — were first detected in the 1980s. One lies beneath Africa and another below the Pacific Ocean. ... If Theia were a certain size and consistency, and struck the Earth at a specific speed, the models showed it could, in fact, leave behind massive hunks of its guts within Earth’s mantle and also spawn the debris that would go on to create our moon. ...


    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/03/world/...scn/index.html
    Dinosaur killer and more ...

    Asteroid that doomed the dinosaurs halted a key process for life on Earth, scientists say


    The age of the dinosaurs ended 66 million years ago when a city-size asteroid struck a shallow sea off the coast of what is now Mexico.

    But exactly how the mass extinction of 75% of the species on Earth unfolded in the years that followed the cataclysmic impact has remained unclear.

    Previous research suggested that sulfur released during the impact, which left the 112-mile-wide (180-kilometer-wide) Chicxulub crater, and soot from wildfires triggered a global winter, and temperatures plunged.

    However, a new study published Monday in the journal Nature Geoscience suggests that fine dust made from pulverized rock thrown up into Earth’s atmosphere in the wake of the impact likely played a greater role. This dust blocked the sun to an extent that plants were unable to photosynthesize, a biological process critical for life, for almost two years afterward.

    “Photosynthesis shutting down for almost two years after impact caused severe challenges (for life),” said lead study author and planetary scientist Cem Berk Senel, a postdoctoral researcher at the Royal Observatory of Belgium. “It collapsed the food web, creating a chain reaction of extinctions.” ... The team determined that this fine dust could have remained in the atmosphere for up to 15 years after the asteroid strike. The researchers suggested the global climate may have cooled by as much as 15 degrees Celsius.

    Their research marked the first time these dust particles had been studied in detail.

    “It had been long assumed that the main killing mechanism was extreme cold following the Chicxulub impact, but of course the cessation of photosynthesis after impact is a mechanism itself,” Senel said.

    “Within a few weeks, months (of the impact), the planet underwent a global shutdown in photosynthesis, which continued for almost two years during which photosynthesis is completely gone,” Senel added. “Then it starts getting back to recovery after these two years. … Within three to four years, it reaches a complete recovery.”

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/30/americ...scn/index.html
    Old fossils new fuel ...

    They went hunting for fossil fuels. What they found could help save the world


    When two scientists went looking for fossil fuels beneath the ground of northeastern France, they did not expect to discover something which could supercharge the effort to tackle the climate crisis. ... That could make it one of the largest deposits of “white hydrogen” ever discovered, Pironon said. The find has helped fuel an already feverish interest in the gas.

    White hydrogen – also referred to as “natural,” “gold” or “geologic” hydrogen – is naturally produced or present in the Earth’s crust and has become something of a climate holy grail. ...
    White hydrogen is “very promising,” agreed Isabelle Moretti, a scientific researcher at the University of Pau et des Pays de l’Adour and the University of Sorbonne and a white hydrogen expert.

    “Now the question is no longer about the resource… but where to find large economic reserves,” she told CNN.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/29/climat...ate/index.html
    Memorial for a pioneer ...

    Second person to receive experimental pig heart transplant dies nearly six weeks after procedure


    Lawrence Faucette, the second living person to receive a genetically modified pig heart in a transplant, has died six weeks after the experimental procedure. The University of Maryland Medical Center, where the experimental procedure had been performed, said the heart began to show signs of rejection in recent days. ... One month after his surgery, his doctors said they believed his heart function was excellent and had withdrawn any drugs to support his heart function.

    “We’ve had no evidence of infections and no evidence of rejection right now,” Griffith said at the time.

    Doctors had treated Faucette with an experimental antibody treatment to further suppress the immune system and prevent rejection. However organ rejection is “the most significant challenge with traditional transplants involving human organs as well,” said UMMC in a statement.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/10/31/health...ransplant-dies
    Crispr for Sickle Cell ... at great cost ...

    FDA moves closer to sickle cell cure that uses gene editing

    If approved by the FDA, it would be the first medication on the market that uses the groundbreaking gene-editing tool CRISPR.


    ... “The promise of a universally available, potentially curative option for individuals with sickle cell disease is revolutionary,” said Dr. Biree Andemariam, a hematologist and the director of the New England Sickle Cell Institute at the University of Connecticut. Andemariam has consulted for Vertex Pharmaceuticals, which makes exa-cel.

    The illness is chronic, and the only known cure is a bone marrow transplant from a donor, which carries the risk of rejection.

    The gene-editing drug, from Vertex along with CRISPR Therapeutics, would eliminate the need for a donor. Instead, it works by changing the DNA in the patient’s blood cells.

    Exa-cel uses CRISPR, a gene-editing tool that’s able to target certain stretches of DNA and snip them out, essentially deleting the unwanted section that, in the case of sickle cell disease, causes the cells to take on a crescent shape. ...

    ...
    No drug that uses CRISPR gene-editing — which was invented in 2009 — has been granted FDA approval. What’s more, Tuesday’s meeting looked different from past advisory committee meetings. In this case, the panel was not asked to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of Vertex’s drug, which is seeking approval for people ages 12 and up with severe illness.

    Instead, the focus was on the “off-target” effects of CRISPR — that is, when the technology makes cuts to other stretches of the DNA other than the intended target — and how the FDA should think about those risks moving forward. ...

    ... Vertex Pharmaceuticals presented research findings on 46 people who received the treatment. Among the 30 patients with a minimum of 18 months of follow-up, 29 no longer experienced severe pain crises.

    The company said there was no evidence of “off-target” effects from the therapy, but committee members questioned whether Vertex’s analysis was thorough enough. ...

    ... Vertex has not disclosed the price of gene therapy, but, if it is approved, it is expected to be extremely expensive, potentially costing as much as $2 million per patient, according to a report from the Institute for Clinical and Economic Review, a nonprofit group that helps determine fair prices for drugs.

    Dr. Stephan Grupp, the chief of the therapy and transplant section of Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, who consults for Vertex, said in an email that if it is approved, the step next would be to make sure patients can get access. ...
    Brain game ...

    Neural Networks Go Nano: Brain-Inspired Learning Takes Flight

    Researchers from the University of Sydney and UCLA have developed a physical neural network that can learn and remember in real-time, much like the brain’s neurons. This breakthrough utilizes nanowire networks that mirror neural networks in the brain. The study has significant implications for the future of efficient, low-energy machine intelligence, particularly in online learning settings. ... The result opens a pathway for developing efficient and low-energy machine intelligence for more complex, real-world learning and memory tasks. ...

    ... “This is a significant step forward as achieving an online learning capability is challenging when dealing with large amounts of data that can be continuously changing. A standard approach would be to store data in memory and then train a machine learning model using that stored information. But this would chew up too much energy for widespread application ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/neural-netw...-takes-flight/


    High mobile phone use may impact sperm count, study says

    Male sperm count has fallen by more than 50% globally in the last 50 years, leaving researchers scrambling to understand why. Could it be pollution, PFAS and other potential toxins in our food and water, an increase in obesity and chronic disease, or even the ever-present mobile phone? A new study explored the role of cell phones and found men between the ages of 18 and 22 who said they used their phones more than 20 times a day had a 21% higher risk for a low overall sperm count. The men also had a 30% higher risk for a low sperm concentration, a less important measure of sperm count in a milliliter of semen. The study did not specify whether the men called or texted or used their phones to do both.

    On the positive side, researchers found that as phone technology improved over the 13 years of the study, the impact on sperm count began to ease.

    “I am intrigued by the observation that the biggest effect was apparently seen with older 2G and 3G phones compared to modern 4G and 5G versions. This is not something I am able to explain,” ...

    ... Radiofrequency electromagnetic fields are greatly reduced when texting and highest when downloading large files, streaming audio or video, when only one or two bars are displayed, and when in a fast-moving bus, car or train, according to the California Department of Public Health.

    The agency recommends keeping the phone away from the body and head — use the speakerphone or headphones instead — and carry the phone in a backpack in a backpack, briefcase or purse. ... Results showed that men who used their phones one to five times a day or less than once a week had much higher sperm counts and concentration. As cell phone usage climbed, sperm count dropped, with the lowest levels among men using their phone 20 or more times a day.

    Researchers also evaluated the impact of cell phones over different periods of time. The greatest association between low sperm count and concentration and phone use were between 2005 and 2007. As companies moved from 2G up to 5G, the association weakened, in line with the “corresponding decrease in the phone’s output power,” the study said.

    “It’s very, very difficult to draw a definitive conclusion from this type of study because it’s not controlled well enough to be able to do that,” Pastuszak said. “They can’t control for the day-to-day exposures of living in an urban environment, and those should not be understated. Even stress levels can impact spermatogenesis and hormone production.”

    As an infertility expert who works daily with couples trying to conceive, Pastuszak points to the fascinating complexity of factors that impact infertility, for which sperm count and concentration are minor players.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/01/health...ess/index.html
    I empathize with R2D2 ...

    Embarrassed for a Robot? How Humans Relate to Machines on an Emotional Level

    A virtual-reality study led by Toyohashi University of Technology revealed that humans can experience empathic embarrassment for robots in awkward situations. Participants showed emotional reactions, both in self-reported feelings and physiological responses, towards both human and robot avatars in embarrassing contexts. However, cognitive empathy was stronger for human avatars. These insights have implications for the future of human-robot interactions and our understanding of human empathy.



    https://scitechdaily.com/embarrassed...otional-level/
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    Last edited by Jundo; 11-05-2023 at 02:24 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  19. #1019
    Some ASTOUNDING views of the Heavens this week, including from the new Euclid space telescope ...

    Galactic Wonders Unveiled: Euclid’s Deep Dive Into the Perseus Cluster

    ... This incredible snapshot from Euclid is a revolution for astronomy. The image shows 1000 galaxies belonging to the Perseus Cluster, and more than 100,000 additional galaxies further away in the background, each containing up to hundreds of billions of stars. ... Many of these faint galaxies were previously unseen. Some of them are so distant that their light has taken 10 billion years to reach us. By mapping the distribution and shapes of these galaxies, cosmologists will be able to find out more about how dark matter shaped the Universe that we see today.


    Euclid ... was developed by the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Euclid Consortium and was launched on 1 July 2023. ... The objective of the Euclid mission is to better understand dark energy and dark matter by accurately measuring the accelerating expansion of the universe. https://www.esa.int/Science_Explorat...uclid_overview

    Euclid’s wide perspective can record data from a part of the sky 100 times bigger than what NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope’s camera can capture. ... “We have never seen astronomical images like this before, containing so much detail. They are even more beautiful and sharp than we could have hoped for, showing us many previously unseen features in well-known areas of the nearby Universe. Now we are ready to observe billions of galaxies, and study their evolution over cosmic time,” said René Laureijs, ESA’s Euclid project scientist, in a statement. https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/07/world/...scn/index.html

    ALSO

    https://scitechdaily.com/unveiling-t...ter-mysteries/
    Euclid’s advanced imaging presents a spectacularly detailed panorama of the Horsehead Nebula, located within the Orion constellation.

    At approximately 1375 light-years away, the Horsehead – visible as a dark cloud shaped like a horse’s head – is the closest giant star-forming region to Earth. ... In Euclid’s new observation of this stellar nursery, scientists hope to find many dim and previously unseen Jupiter-mass planets in their celestial infancy, as well as young brown dwarfs and baby stars.

    https://scitechdaily.com/euclids-cos...sehead-nebula/
    Euclid’s Eye on the “Hidden Galaxy” – A Spiral Revelation in Infrared

    Euclid, with its powerful imaging technology, has unveiled the intricacies of the ‘Hidden Galaxy’, IC 342, setting the stage for a deeper exploration of the Universe’s structure. ... This galaxy, also known as IC 342 or Caldwell 5, is difficult to observe because it lies behind the busy disc of our Milky Way, and so dust, gas, and stars obscure our view. ...

    Cosmic Fossils Unearthed: Euclid Unravels the Ancient NGC 6397 Cluster

    Euclid has captured a comprehensive image of the NGC 6397 globular cluster, located in the Milky Way’s disc and containing stars that offer insights into the galaxy’s history. Observing the entire cluster, especially the faint stars in its outer regions, has been a challenge for existing telescopes. Euclid’s capabilities, however, allow it to distinguish these faint stars, enabling the search for ‘tidal tails’ that can indicate past interactions and help map dark matter within the Milky Way. ... Located about 7800 light-years from Earth, NGC 6397 is the second-closest globular cluster to us. Together with other globular clusters it orbits in the disc of the Milky Way, where the majority of stars are located.


    https://scitechdaily.com/cosmic-foss...-6397-cluster/
    Telescopes spot the oldest and most distant black hole formed after the big bang

    Astronomers found the most distant black hole ever detected in X-rays using the Chandra and Webb space telescopes. The Abell 2744 galaxy cluster dominates this image, while the closeups from each telescope show the more distant galaxy UHZ1 and the black hole it hosts. ... a growing black hole within the early universe just 470 million years after the big bang, which occurred 13.8 billion years ago.

    ... Astronomers think the discovery will help them to better understand how supermassive black holes appeared and reached their monstrous masses so soon after the beginning of the universe. The researchers want to know whether the giant celestial objects formed when massive clouds of gas collapsed or if they resulted from the explosions of the very first massive stars. ...



    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/07/world/...scn/index.html

    ALSO

    https://scitechdaily.com/nasa-discov...ht-years-away/

    https://scitechdaily.com/from-the-un...-hole-origins/

    Hubble’s Stellar Detective Work: Unmasking the Milky Way’s Hidden Jewel

    This colorful image of the globular star cluster Terzan 12 is a spectacular example of how dust in space affects starlight coming from background objects.

    A globular star cluster is a conglomeration of stars, arranged in a spheroidal shape. Stars in globular clusters are bound together by gravity, with a higher concentration of stars towards the center. The Milky Way has about 150 ancient globular clusters at its outskirts. These clusters orbit around the galactic center, but far above and below the pancake-flat plane of our galaxy, like bees buzzing around a hive. ...

    The cluster is about 15,000 light-years from Earth. ...


    https://scitechdaily.com/hubbles-ste...-hidden-jewel/
    Galactic Collision Captured in Stunning Detail: NASA’s Webb & Hubble Unite To Create Most Colorful View of Universe

    This panchromatic view of galaxy cluster MACS0416 was created by combining infrared observations from NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope with visible-light data from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope. ... The result: A vivid landscape of galaxies along with more than a dozen newfound, time-varying objects. ... The resulting panchromatic image combines visible and infrared light to assemble one of the most comprehensive views of the universe ever taken. Located about 4.3 billion light-years from Earth, MACS0416 is a pair of colliding galaxy clusters that will eventually combine to form an even bigger cluster.

    ‘Puzzling’ discovery spotted in new images from NASA mission’s asteroid flyby

    Dinkinesh, a small asteroid that NASA’s Lucy mission visited last week, continues to surprise. ... there was more to the shadowy asteroid than expected. At first, images suggested that the space rock was part of a binary pair, with a smaller asteroid orbiting Dinkinesh. However, additional images taken by the spacecraft just after the flyby’s closest approach have now revealed that the smaller asteroid is actually a contact binary — two smaller space rocks that touch each other. “Contact binaries seem to be fairly common in the solar system,” said John Spencer, Lucy deputy project scientist at the Southwest Research Institute, in a statement. “We haven’t seen many up-close, and we’ve never seen one orbiting another asteroid. ...

    And behold ... our Milky Way doppelganger ...

    Cosmic Surprise: Webb Spots Milky Way’s Twin in Early Universe

    Astronomers using the James Webb Space Telescope, have discovered ceers-2112, the most distant barred spiral galaxy observed to date. This challenges prior assumptions about galaxy evolution, showing that galaxies became orderly earlier than previously believed, and may lead to changes in theoretical models of galaxy formation. ... “This galaxy, named ceers-2112, formed soon after the Big Bang,” said coauthor de la Vega, a postdoctoral researcher in the Department of Physics and Astronomy. “Finding ceers-2112 shows that galaxies in the early universe could be as ordered as the Milky Way. This is surprising because galaxies were much more chaotic in the early universe and very few had similar structures to the Milky Way.”

    https://scitechdaily.com/cosmic-surp...arly-universe/
    Well, no termites up there ...

    Japanese scientists want to send a wooden satellite into space

    ... A researcher at Kyoto University in Japan, Murata has been exploring how biological materials could be used in space.

    Murata wondered if he “could build a wooden house on the moon or Mars,” and decided to test the theory — by creating a wooden satellite.

    Recent research from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) found that 10% of atmospheric aerosol in the stratosphere contained metallic particles from spacecraft, including satellites. The long-term impact of these metal fragments is unknown, but scientists are concerned it could damage Earth’s fragile ozone layer. Wooden satellites would be better for the planet while still providing the same functionality as their metal counterparts, says Murata.

    “At the end of their life, satellites re-enter the atmosphere. The difference is, the wood in the LingoSat will burn up and eventually become a gas, whereas metals become fine particles instead,” says Murata.

    It’s not just a pipedream: Murata and his team have been working on the project for four years and sent wood samples to space in 2021 to test the material’s resilience to space conditions.

    Now, they are working with Japan’s space agency (JAXA) and NASA to send the prototype satellite, called LingoSat, into orbit early next year. ... “There is not much reduction in strength from minus 150 to 150 degrees Celsius (-238 to 302 degrees Fahrenheit), we confirmed that in our experiments,” says Murata. “But a satellite goes round the Earth and has these huge temperature differences in 90 minutes. We don’t know to what extent the satellite can withstand this intense, repeated cycle of temperature difference, so this has to be investigated.” ...


    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/07/asia/j...spc/index.html
    From ice to planets ...

    Webb’s Window Into Cosmic Birth: Ice Pebble Drift Sparks Planetary Life

    How are planets born? Scientists have long proposed that ice-covered pebbles are the seeds of planet formation. These icy solids are thought to drift toward the newborn star from the cold, outer reaches of the disk surrounding it. The theory predicts that, as these pebbles enter the warmer region closer to the star, they would release significant amounts of cold water vapor, delivering both water and solids to nascent planets.

    Now, the James Webb Space Telescope has witnessed this process in action, revealing the connection between water vapor in the inner disk and the drifting of icy pebbles from the outer disk. This finding opens exciting, new vistas into the study of rocky planet formation.

    https://scitechdaily.com/webbs-windo...lanetary-life/
    From space to civilization ...

    Scientists Uncover Mysterious Cosmic Gift That Sparked Agricultural Revolution in Ancient Syria

    Agriculture in Syria started with a bang 12,800 years ago following a comet fragment’s explosive entry into Earth’s atmosphere. This cataclysmic event, coupled with ensuing environmental changes, compelled the hunter-gatherers of the prehistoric Abu Hureyra settlement to adopt agricultural practices for survival. ... The papers are the latest results in the investigation of the Younger Dryas Impact Hypothesis, the idea that an anomalous cooling of the Earth almost 13 millennia ago was the result of a cosmic impact. ...

    “In this general region, there was a change from more humid conditions that were forested and with diverse sources of food for hunter-gatherers, to drier, cooler conditions when they could no longer subsist only as hunter-gatherers,” said Earth scientist James Kennett, a professor emeritus of UC Santa Barbara. The settlement at Abu Hureyra is famous among archaeologists for its evidence of the earliest known transition from foraging to farming. “The villagers started to cultivate barley, wheat, and legumes,” he noted. “This is what the evidence clearly shows.” ... Before the impact, the researchers found, the inhabitants’ prehistoric diet involved wild legumes and wild-type grains, and “small but significant amounts of wild fruits and berries.” In the layers corresponding to the time after cooling, fruits, and berries disappeared and their diet shifted toward more domestic-type grains and lentils, as the people experimented with early cultivation methods. By about 1,000 years later, all of the Neolithic “founder crops” — emmer wheat, einkorn wheat, hulled barley, rye, peas, lentils, bitter vetch, chickpeas, and flax — were being cultivated in what is now called the Fertile Crescent. ... To be clear, Kennett said, agriculture eventually arose in several places on Earth in the Neolithic Era, but it arose first in the Levant (present-day Syria, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, Israel, and parts of Turkey) initiated by the severe climate conditions that followed the impact. ...

    ... In the 12,800-year-old layers corresponding to the shift between hunting and gathering and agriculture, the record at Abu Hureyra shows evidence of massive burning. The evidence includes a carbon-rich “black mat” layer with high concentrations of platinum, nanodiamonds and tiny metallic spherules that could only have been formed under extremely high temperatures — higher than any that could have been produced by man’s technology at the time.

    The airburst flattened trees and straw huts, splashing meltglass onto cereals and grains, as well as on the early buildings, tools and animal bones found in the mound — and most likely on people, too.

    https://scitechdaily.com/scientists-...ancient-syria/
    AI in SPACE ...

    SONATE-2’s Space Odyssey: Testing AI’s Limits in Space

    SONATE-2, a nanosatellite developed by JMU, is scheduled for launch in March 2024 to test novel AI technologies and other advanced systems in space. ... The satellite will test novel artificial intelligence (AI) hardware and software technologies in near-Earth space. The goal is to use it to automatically detect anomalies on planets or asteroids in the future.

    ... “What is unique about our mission is that the AI is trained on board. Normally, this training is done on Earth with powerful computers. ... Sending this data to Earth first and then training the AI by remote control would take a long time for missions far from Earth. A higher level of autonomy supported by AI directly on board would be more powerful. It would lead to interesting objects and phenomena on the asteroid being detected much more quickly. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/sonate-2s-s...mits-in-space/

    The Würzburg SONATE-2 satellite is about the size of a shoebox. Its solar panels are folded out here.

    AI helps CRISPR too ...CRISP-AI-R ...

    Revolutionizing CRISPR: Quantum Biology and AI Merge to Enhance Genome Editing

    Scientists at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have advanced CRISPR Cas9 technology for microbial genome editing by using quantum biology and explainable artificial intelligence. This breakthrough allows for more precise genetic modifications in microbes, expanding the potential for renewable fuel and chemical production. ... The CRISPR Cas9 tool relies on a single, unique guide RNA that directs the Cas9 enzyme to bind with and cleave the corresponding targeted site in the genome. Existing models to computationally predict effective guide RNAs for CRISPR tools were built on data from only a few model species, with weak, inconsistent efficiency when applied to microbes. ... To improve the modeling and design of guide RNA, the ORNL scientists sought a better understanding of what’s going on at the most basic level in cell nuclei, where genetic material is stored. They turned to quantum biology, a field bridging molecular biology and quantum chemistry that investigates the effects that electronic structure can have on the chemical properties and interactions of nucleotides, the molecules that form the building blocks of DNA and RNA.

    The way electrons are distributed in the molecule influences reactivity and conformational stability, including the likelihood that the Cas9 enzyme-guide RNA complex will effectively bind with the microbe’s DNA, said Erica Prates, computational systems biologist at ORNL. ... The scientists built an explainable artificial intelligence model called iterative random forest. They trained the model on a dataset of around 50,000 guide RNAs targeting the genome of E. coli bacteria while also taking into account quantum chemical properties, in an approach described in the journal Nucleic Acids Research.

    The model revealed key features about nucleotides that can enable the selection of better guide RNAs. “The model helped us identify clues about the molecular mechanisms that underpin the efficiency of our guide RNAs,” Prates said, “giving us a rich library of molecular information that can help us improve CRISPR technology.”

    https://scitechdaily.com/revolutioni...enome-editing/
    Is AI like the BrAIn? Is the BrAIn like AI?

    MIT’s Brain Breakthrough: Decoding How Human Learning Mirrors AI Model Training

    MIT research reveals that neural networks trained via self-supervised learning display patterns similar to brain activity, enhancing our understanding of both AI and brain cognition, especially in tasks like motion prediction and spatial navigation.

    Two MIT studies find “self-supervised learning” models, which learn about their environment from unlabeled data, can show activity patterns similar to those of the mammalian brain. ... The researchers found that when they trained models known as neural networks using a particular type of self-supervised learning, the resulting models generated activity patterns very similar to those seen in the brains of animals that were performing the same tasks as the models.

    The findings suggest that these models are able to learn representations of the physical world that they can use to make accurate predictions about what will happen in that world, and that the mammalian brain may be using the same strategy, the researchers say. ... “We can’t say if it’s the whole brain yet, but across scales and disparate brain areas, our results seem to be suggestive of an organizing principle.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/mits-brain-...odel-training/
    HIGH may lead to more "Hi, How are you?" ...

    Boosting Brain Connectivity: Cannabis May Enhance Empathy and Emotional Perception

    A study in the Journal of Neuroscience Research suggests that regular cannabis users may have an improved ability to understand others’ emotions, supported by stronger connectivity in the anterior cingulate, a brain region associated with empathy ... offering potential insights into treatments for social interaction disorders.

    https://scitechdaily.com/boosting-br...al-perception/
    A pharmacy which can be implanted within ...

    Breathing Life Into Medicine: “Living Pharmacy” Implant Gets Oxygenating Boost

    New device could improve the outcomes of cell-based therapies. Cell-based therapies show promise for drug delivery, replacing damaged tissues, harnessing the body’s own healing mechanisms, and more. But keeping cells alive to produce therapies has remained a challenge Researchers used a smart, energy-efficient version of water splitting to produce oxygen for these cells New approach maintains cells in vitro and in vivo, showing promise for both acute and chronic applications.

    https://scitechdaily.com/breathing-l...enating-boost/
    $3 ...

    The $3 Lifesaver: New Blood Test Could Detect Common Deadly Cancers Sooner

    Researchers have developed a cost-effective, multi-cancer blood test that can detect a protein, LINE-1-ORF1p, produced by cancer cells, potentially leading to early detection. This protein is elevated in many cancers and the test’s ability to spot it early can save lives. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/the-3-lifes...ancers-sooner/
    Less weight, less side-effects ... less mouse ...

    New Drug Reverses Obesity Without Side Effects in Preliminary Tests

    Scientists have developed a nanogel-based delivery system that successfully targets and reverses obesity in mice by delivering drugs directly to the liver, avoiding side effects and enhancing drug efficacy. ... “The treated mice completely lost their gained weight, and we did not see any untoward side effects,” says S. Thai Thayumanavan, distinguished professor of chemistry and biomedical engineering. “Considering 100 million Americans have obesity and related cardiometabolic disorders, we became pretty excited about this work.”

    ... “We realized we needed to deliver this drug selectively to the liver because if it goes to other places, it could cause complications,” he says. ... “We came up with a very simple approach, using our unique invention – nanogels that we can direct selectively to different targets, which we call IntelliGels,” Thayumanavan says. “They were custom-designed for hepatocyte delivery in the liver.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/new-drug-re...iminary-tests/
    Two monkeys in one ... but, sadly, an abrupt end ... I wonder why they ended it so quickly? ...

    Scientists create chimeric monkey with two sets of DNA

    Scientists based in China have created a monkey chimera with two sets of DNA, experimental work they say could ultimately benefit medical research and the conservation of endangered species.

    The monkey, which lived for 10 days before being euthanized, was made by combining stem cells from a cynomolgus monkey — also known as a crab-eating or long-tailed macaque, a primate used in biomedical research — with a genetically distinct embryo from the same monkey species. It’s the world’s first live birth of a primate chimera created with stem cells, the researchers said. ... “It is encouraging that our live birth monkey chimera had a big contribution (of stem cells) to the brain, suggesting that indeed this approach should be valuable for modeling neurodegenerative diseases,” ... ...

    ... Wu wasn’t involved in the study but has worked on human-animal chimeras. ...



    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/09/world/...scn/index.html
    Some questions about gene studies ... Have they made a monkey of all of us? ...

    Inaccuracies in Genetic Studies Exposed by NIH – European Ancestry Under the Microscope

    NHGRI researchers have found that failing to account for mixed ancestries in genetic studies of European populations may have led to incorrect associations between genetic variants and traits. ... By considering mixed genetic lineages, researchers at the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), demonstrated that previously inferred links between a genomic variant that helps digest lactose and traits such as a person’s height and cholesterol level may not be valid. As such, the results from previous genome-wide association studies that do not account for admixture in their examinations of people with European ancestry should be re-evaluated. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/inaccuracie...he-microscope/
    How breast implants helped save a man with severe lung damage

    Doctors turned to an unusual tool to help keep 34-year-old Davey Bauer alive after his lungs stopped working: large breast implants. Experts say it was an innovative solution to give Bauer's body time to fight off a nasty infection so it could accept a lifesaving double lung transplant.

    How does she taste the tea?

    'Will AI replace performers?': Japan-first TV ad with artificial model draws attention

    A television commercial featuring a model generated by artificial intelligence (AI) -- reportedly a first for Japan -- has drawn attention on social media, with users expressing surprise and questioning whether AI will replace human performers.

    The ad by Japanese beverage company Ito En Ltd. is for its "Oi Ocha catechin green tea" drink. Comments on social media about the commercial included, "I was wondering who this celebrity was, only to discover it was AI," and, "Is the industry for performers going to be replaced by AI?"

    ... it is the first TV ad in Japan using an AI performer. The theme of the commercial is "The time to change the future is now!" with the storyline being that a woman starts drinking catechin green tea so that she can live healthily in the future. The AI entertainer's age in the commercial changes and she is depicted skipping around, drinking the tea and smiling. ...

    Maybe she uses her AI tongue ...

    Meet HyperTaste, an AI-Assisted Electronic Tongue IBM researchers built an e-tongue that can analyze the chemical composition of liquids

    https://spectrum.ieee.org/meet-hyper...ctronic-tongue
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    Last edited by Jundo; 11-12-2023 at 06:37 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  20. #1020
    What makes a human - human? Does blessing machines means we use our times wisely?

  21. #1021
    Did you feel it?

    Cosmic Flash: Earth Struck by Historic Gamma-Ray Burst From Exploding Star

    An enormous burst of gamma rays, detected by ESA’s Integral space telescope, has struck Earth [At 14:21 BST / 15:21 CEST on October 9, 2022]. The blast caused a significant disturbance in our planet’s ionosphere. Such disturbances are usually associated with energetic particle events on the Sun but this one was the result of an exploding star almost two billion light-years away. Analyzing the effects of the blast could provide information about the mass extinctions in Earth’s history.

    ... “It was probably the brightest gamma-ray burst we have ever detected,” says Mirko Piersanti, University of L’Aquila, Italy, and lead author of the team that published these results. ... So strong in fact that its nearest rival on record is ten times weaker. Statistically, a GRB as strong as GRB 221009A arrives at Earth only once every 10,000 years. ... Gamma-ray bursts were once mysterious events but are now recognized to be the outpouring of energy from exploding stars called supernovae, or from the collision of two super-dense neutron stars. ...

    ... This particular GRB took place in a galaxy almost 2 billion light-years away – hence two billion years ago – yet it still had enough energy to affect Earth. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/cosmic-flas...xploding-star/


    Do you know that SATURN'S RINGS WILL DISAPPEAR SOON!!!! (well, for awhile) ...


    Unveiling Saturn’s Secrets: Eclipses Reveal Ring Transparency

    Τhe main rings, which extend up to 140,000 km (90,000 miles) from the planet, but have a maximum thickness of only 1 km (0.6 miles), are to disappear from view from Earth by 2025. In that year the rings will be tilted edge-on to Earth, making it almost impossible to view them. They will tilt back towards Earth during the next phase of Saturn’s 29-year orbit and will continue to become more visible and brighter until 2032.

    ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/unveiling-s...-transparency/
    Shining a light on the dark ...

    Cosmic Clarity: Gravitational Lensing Reveals the Fine Fabric of Dark Matter

    A team of researchers has used the gravitational lensing of the MG J0414+0534 system, observed with ALMA, to map dark matter distribution in unprecedented detail, confirming theories of cold dark matter and paving the way for further discoveries about the universe’s dominant but elusive component. ... Mysterious dark matter accounts for most of the matter in the Universe. Dark matter is invisible and makes itself know only through its gravitational effects. Dark matter has never been isolated in a laboratory, so researchers must rely on “natural experiments” to study it.

    [Below] Dark matter fluctuations in the lens system MG J0414+0534. The whitish blue color represents the gravitationally lensed images observed by ALMA. The calculated distribution of dark matter is shown in orange; brighter regions indicate higher concentrations of dark matter and dark orange regions indicate lower concentrations.


    https://scitechdaily.com/cosmic-clar...f-dark-matter/
    You can fly to Jupiter! ... or, at least, your name can ...

    Fly Your Name to Jupiter’s Moon: Join NASA’s Europa Odyssey

    Six weeks remain for you to add your name to a microchip that will ride aboard the spacecraft as it explores Jupiter’s moon Europa.

    [The process by which they do it is even more interesting!] ....


    https://scitechdaily.com/fly-your-na...uropa-odyssey/
    I posted this before, but worth mentioning again ...

    CRISPR treatment has been greenlit in UK in global first. Here’s who it could help

    The United Kingdom has become the first country to give regulatory approval to a medical treatment involving the revolutionary CRISPR gene editing tool.

    The country’s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency said Thursday it had given a greenlight to a treatment known as Casgevy, which will be used to treat sickle cell disease and beta thalassemia. Both genetic conditions are caused by errors in the genes for hemoglobin, which is used by red blood cells to carry oxygen around the body. There is no known universally successful treatment for either disorder.

    Sickle cell disease, which can result in attacks of debilitating pain, is more common in people with an African or Caribbean family background. Beta thalassemia mainly affects people of Mediterranean, South Asian, Southeast Asian and Middle Eastern origin, the statement said.

    ... The CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing technique allows scientists to make very precise changes to DNA. Its inventors — Emmanuelle Charpentier and Jennifer A. Doudna — won a Nobel Prize in chemistry in 2020.

    Casgevy isn’t a simple pill or injection. The treatment, made by Vertex Pharmaceuticals, is administered by taking stem cells out of a patient’s bone marrow and editing a gene in the cells in a lab. Patients then must undergo a “conditioning treatment,” which can involve an immunosuppressing drug, radiotherapy or chemotherapy, to prepare the bone marrow before the modified cells are infused back into the patient, according to the MHRA.

    “After that, patients may need to spend at least a month in a hospital facility while the treated cells take up residence in the bone marrow and start to make red blood cells with the stable form of haemoglobin,” according to the statement.

    The US Food and Drug Administration is evaluating the same treatment and is expected to make a decision on whether to greenlight it by December 8. ... The release from the MHRA did not say how much the treatment would cost, but it’s likely to be expensive.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/16/health...scn/index.html
    This is not good news ... ... although maybe will help with over-population

    Common pesticides in food reducing sperm count worldwide, study says

    Pesticides used in our homes, gardens and lawns and sprayed on foods we eat are contributing to a dramatic decline in sperm count among men worldwide, according to a new analysis of studies over the last 50 years.

    “Over the course of 50 years, sperm concentration has fallen about 50% around the world,” said senior study author Melissa Perry, dean of the College of Public Health at George Mason University in Fairfax, Virginia.

    “What is not known is the culprit,” Perry said. “While there are likely many more contributing causes, our study demonstrates a strong association between two common insecticides —organophosphates and N-methyl carbamates — and the decline of sperm concentration.”

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/15/health...ess/index.html
    And in case we stop reproducing ... this is faster than humans anyway ...

    The “Self-Driving Lab” That Unlocks Quantum Dot Secrets in Hours – Instead of Years

    Researchers have developed SmartDope, an autonomous system capable of rapidly identifying the best materials for electronic and photonic devices, addressing a longstanding challenge in quantum dot synthesis. SmartDope operates as a self-driving lab, conducting experiments in a continuous flow reactor and utilizing machine learning to optimize quantum dot production. In just one day, it surpassed the previous quantum yield record, showcasing the potential of self-driving labs for accelerating material science. ... It can take years of focused laboratory work to determine how to make the highest quality materials for use in electronic and photonic devices. Researchers have now developed an autonomous system that can identify how to synthesize “best-in-class” materials for specific applications in hours or days.

    ... The SmartDope system is a “self-driving” lab. ... Once it has received that initial information, SmartDope begins running experiments autonomously. The experiments are conducted in a continuous flow reactor that uses extremely small amounts of chemicals to conduct quantum dot synthesis experiments rapidly as the precursors flow through the system and react with each other. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/smartdope-t...tead-of-years/
    A chip off the old block ...

    A Milestone in Computing: 2D In-Memory Processor With Over 1000 Transistors

    EPFL researchers have created an energy-efficient in-memory processor using MoS2, combining over 1000 transistors. This processor, which efficiently performs vector-matrix multiplication, represents a shift away from traditional von Neumann architecture and could boost the European semiconductor industry.

    https://scitechdaily.com/a-milestone...0-transistors/
    Ever see a pattern when sitting Zazen, facing the wall ...

    New Study Decodes Pareidolia in 40,000-Year-Old Cave Paintings

    New suggests that Ice Age cave art was partly influenced by pareidolia, a phenomenon where humans see meaningful shapes in random patterns. Focusing on caves in Northern Spain, the study found that many images incorporated natural features of the cave walls, indicating that artists were influenced by both pareidolia and their creativity.


    ... Top image: Upper Palaeolithic drawing of the partial outline of a horse that uses the natural edge of the cave wall to represent the back and head of the horse. Bottom image: The same horse drawing under the simulated VR light conditions. ...
    ... While Americans slowly return to being cavemen ...

    Americans’ trust in science declining, Pew survey says

    mericans’ trust in science and scientists has dropped since the start of the Covid-19 pandemic, according to a new report by Pew Research Center.

    The percent of American adults who say science has a “mostly positive” effect on society fell to 57%, down 8 percentage points since November 2021 and 16 percentage points since just before the pandemic, according to the survey of more than 8,800 U.S. adults conducted in the last week of September. More than a third of respondents believed that the impact of science has been equally positive and negative, while 8% think science has a “mostly negative” impact on society.

    ... Trust in science wasn’t the same across the political spectrum: The Pew survey found that Republicans had less confidence in scientists and the benefits of science than Democrats. Less than half of Republicans (47%) said science has had a mostly positive effect on society, a decline from 70% in 2019. Sixty-nine percent of Democrats say science has had a mostly positive effect on society, although that has also declined by 8 points from 2019. ...

    ... Despite public opinion turning away from science, nearly three-quarters of U.S. adults expressed confidence in scientists to act in the public’s best interest. More Americans had at least some faith in scientists to act in the public’s best interest than other prominent groups, such as business leaders, religious leaders, journalists and elected officials. ...

    ... Wallace attributes the rise of scientific mistrust to what she described as an “infodemic” about Covid-19: an influx of conflicting information and opinions about the virus and prevention measures.

    “It led to a lot of public chaos, bewilderment, message fatigue and people just kind of checking out,” Wallace told CNN. “It just causes a lot of confusion because we have different people with big platforms saying different things.” ... “Everyone was at home on social media and interacting in these echo chambers filtering out any information they didn’t want to see,” Wallace said. “Different groups come to different conclusions because they’re interacting with different information.”

    And often, experts say, that flood of false information was intentional and malicious — attacking scientific voices in favor of inaccurate content.

    Dr. Peter Hotez, the dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, said a “revisionist history” popped up as the pandemic emerged, blaming scientists for seeding mistrust and exacerbating the harms of Covid-19.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/14/health...vey/index.html
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  22. #1022
    Some truly POWERFUL and OUT OF THIS WORLD stories this week ... starting with ...

    Mysterious cosmic ray observed in Utah came from beyond our galaxy, scientists say - Astronomers Shocked by Mysterious Ultra-High-Energy Cosmic Ray – “What the Heck Is Going On?”

    Space scientists seeking to understand the enigmatic origins of powerful cosmic rays have detected an extremely rare, ultra-high-energy particle that they believe traveled to Earth from beyond the Milky Way galaxy.

    The energy of this subatomic particle, invisible to the naked eye, is equivalent to dropping a brick on your toe from waist height, according to the authors of new research published Thursday in the journal Science. It rivals the single most energetic cosmic ray ever observed, the “Oh-My-God” particle that was detected in 1991, the study found.

    ... “If you hold out your hand, one (cosmic ray) goes through the palm of your hand every second, but those are really low-energy things,” said study coauthor John Matthews, a research professor at the University of Utah.

    “When you get out to these really high-energy (cosmic rays), it’s more like one per square kilometer per century. It’s never going through your hand.” ...

    ... The source of these ultra-high-energy particles baffles scientists.

    Matthews, a co-spokesman for the Telescope Array Collaboration, said the two biggest recorded cosmic rays appeared “sort of random” — when their trajectories are traced back, there appears to be nothing high-energy enough to produce such particles. The Amaterasu particle, specifically, seemed to originate from what’s known as the Local Void, an empty area of space bordering the Milky Way galaxy. “If you take the two highest-energy events — the one that we just found, the ‘Oh-My-God’ particle — those don’t even seem to point to anything. It should be something relatively close. Astronomers with visible telescopes can’t see anything really big and really violent,” Matthews said. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/23/americ...scn/index.html
    Looking inward ...

    Webb telescope captures never-before-seen glimpse of the heart of the Milky Way

    The James Webb Space Telescope has looked into the heart of the Milky Way galaxy, unveiling new features and mysteries within the chaotic region that could help astronomers unravel more details about the early universe. ... Astronomers used Webb to glimpse Sagittarius C, or Sgr C, an active region of star formation located about 300 light-years from the galaxy’s central supermassive black hole Sagittarius A*. A light-year, equivalent to 5.88 trillion miles (9.46 trillion kilometers), is how far a beam of light travels in one year. ... Studying the Milky Way’s center with Webb could provide insights into how many stars form there and whether massive stars are more likely to form near the galactic center rather than the galaxy’s spiral arms. “There’s never been any infrared data on this region with the level of resolution and sensitivity we get with Webb, so we are seeing lots of features here for the first time” ...

    ... There are an estimated 500,000 stars glittering within the image, all ranging in size and age. Among them are a cluster of protostars, or dense masses of dust and gas that are still developing and growing into full-fledged stars — including a massive protostar at the cluster’s center that has more than 30 times the mass of the sun.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/20/world/...scn/index.html

    ALSO:

    https://scitechdaily.com/hidden-wond...-of-milky-way/


    This image of Sagittarius C (Sgr), captured by Webb’s Near-Infrared Camera (NIRCam), shows compass arrows, scale bar, and color key for reference.
    The north and east compass arrows show the orientation of the image on the sky. Note that the relationship between north and east on the sky (as seen from below) is flipped relative to direction arrows on a map of the ground (as seen from above).
    The scale bar is labeled in light-years, which is the distance that light travels in one Earth-year. (It takes 3 years for light to travel a distance equal to the length of the scale bar.) One light-year is equal to about 5.88 trillion miles or 9.46 trillion kilometers. The field of view shown in this image is approximately 50 light-years long.
    Talk about a long distance call ...

    ‘First light’: NASA receives laser-beamed message from 10 million miles away

    An innovative experiment flying aboard NASA’s Psyche mission just hit its first major milestone by successfully carrying out the most distant demonstration of laser communications. The tech demo could one day help NASA missions probe deeper into space and uncover more discoveries about the origin of the universe. ... The experiment beamed a laser encoded with data from far beyond the moon for the first time. The test data was sent from nearly 10 million miles (16 million kilometers) away and reached the Hale Telescope at the California Institute of Technology’s Palomar Observatory in Pasadena, California. ...

    ... During first light, it took only 50 seconds for the laser to travel from Psyche to Earth. At the farthest distance between the spacecraft and Earth, the laser is expected to take 20 minutes to travel one way. And during that time, the spacecraft will continue to move and Earth will rotate. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/24/world/...scn/index.html
    And we need good maps ...

    Gaia’s Galactic Cartography: Building the Most Detailed 3D Map of the Milky Way

    Gaia is creating an extraordinarily precise three-dimensional map of more than a billion stars throughout our Milky Way galaxy and beyond. It is mapping their motions, luminosity, temperature, and composition. This huge stellar census will provide the data needed to tackle an enormous range of important questions related to the origin, structure, and evolutionary history of our galaxy.

    https://scitechdaily.com/gaias-galac...the-milky-way/
    Jet power ...

    Giant Telescope – 8x the Size of Earth – Reveals Unprecedented View of Colossal Cosmic Jet

    Using a network of radio telescopes on Earth and in space, astronomers have captured the most detailed view ever of a jet of plasma shooting from a supermassive black hole at the heart of a distant galaxy.

    The jet, which comes from the heart of a distant blazar called 3C 279, travels at nearly the speed of light and shows complex, twisted patterns near its source. ... Blazars are the brightest and most powerful sources of electromagnetic radiation in the cosmos. They are a subclass of active galactic nuclei comprising galaxies with a central supermassive black hole accreting matter from a surrounding disk. About 10% of active galactic nuclei, classified as quasars, produce relativistic plasma jets. Bazars belong to a small fraction of quasars in which we can see these jets pointing almost directly at the observer. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/giant-teles...al-cosmic-jet/

    Then, looking down ...

    Unlocking Fundamental Mysteries: Using Near-Miss Particle Physics to Peer Into Quantum World

    In a breakthrough at CERN, scientists measured the elusive tau particle’s magnetic moment using near-miss particle interactions in the Large Hadron Collider. This method, marking a significant advancement in particle physics, has the potential to reveal unknown aspects of the universe’s fundamental nature. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/unlocking-f...quantum-world/
    ... and more to come ...
    Last edited by Jundo; 11-26-2023 at 01:50 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  23. #1023
    New clues on the origin of life ...

    The Primordial Brew: How Ancient Seas Molded Life on Earth

    Recent research has shown that the formation of greenalite in ancient oceans played a crucial role in determining the availability of certain metals, such as manganese and molybdenum, which were vital for early life forms. ... All life uses nutrients such as zinc and copper to form proteins. The oldest lifeforms evolved in the Archean Eon, three and a half billion years before the dinosaurs first appeared. These microbes showed a preference for metals such as molybdenum and manganese compared to their more recent counterparts. This preference is thought to reflect the availability of metals in the ocean at that time. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/the-primord...life-on-earth/

    Maps of space, and maps of the the connections within the brain ...

    Mind Mapping: A Human Brain Cell Atlas Ushering In “A New Era in Brain Science”

    Researchers from the Salk Institute, in a global collaboration, have produced a detailed atlas of human brain cells by analyzing over half a million cells. The study, part of the NIH’s BRAIN Initiative, marks a pivotal shift in understanding brain cell diversity and function. ... The research, published in a special issue of the journal Science on October 13, 2023, is the first time that techniques to identify brain cell subtypes originally developed and applied in mice have been applied to human brains. ...

    ... Every cell in a human brain contains the same sequence of DNA, but in different cell types different genes are copied onto strands of RNA for use as protein blueprints. This ultimate variation in which proteins are found in which cells—and at what levels—allows the vast diversity in types of brain cells and the complexity of the brain. Knowing which cells rely on which DNA sequences to function is critical not only to understanding how the brain works, but also how mutations in DNA can cause brain disorders and, relatedly, how to treat those disorders. ...

    ... Other research teams whose work is also published in the special issue of Science used cells from the same three human brains to test their own cell profiling techniques, including a group at UC San Diego led by Bing Ren—also a co-author in Ecker and Behrens’ study. Ren’s team revealed a link between specific brain cell types and neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, Alzheimer’s disease, and major depression. Additionally, the team developed artificial intelligence deep learning models that predict risk for these disorders. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/mind-mappin...brain-science/
    Our brains should feel thankful for Microglia ...

    Microglia’s Key Function in Brain Development Uncovered

    Researchers have discovered the vital role of microglia in brain development by studying lab-grown brain organoids. ... Scientists have found that microglia play a crucial role in regulating the number of cells that become neurons in the brain, enhancing our understanding of brain development and disorders.

    ... The microglia-like cells were found to contain lipid droplets containing cholesterol, which were released and taken up by other developing brain cells in the organoids. This cholesterol exchange was shown to significantly enhance the growth and development of these brain cells, especially their progenitors. ... Cholesterol is abundant in the brain and constitutes about 25% of the body’s total cholesterol content. It is essential for the structure and function of neurons. Abnormal cholesterol metabolism has been linked to various neurological disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s Disease. ...

    BELOW: Super-resolution image of human stem cell-derived Microglia cells with labeled mitochondria (yellow), nucleus (magenta), and actin filaments (cyan).


    https://scitechdaily.com/microglias-...ent-uncovered/
    And don't forget the little brain ...

    Rethinking the “Little Brain” – The Surprising Learning Power of Cerebellar Nuclei

    Associative learning was always thought to be regulated by the cortex of the cerebellum, often referred to as the “little brain”. However, new research from a collaboration between the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience, Erasmus MC, and Champalimaud Center for the Unknown reveals that actually the nuclei of the cerebellum make a surprising contribution to this learning process. ...

    If a teacup is steaming, you’ll wait a bit longer before drinking from it. And if your fingers get caught in the door, you’ll be more careful next time. These are forms of associative learning, where a positive or negative experience leads to learning behavior. We know that our cerebellum is important in this form of learning. But how exactly does this work? ...

    ... If you look at the cerebellum, you can distinguish two major parts in it: the cerebellar cortex, or the outer layer of the cerebellum, and the cerebellar nuclei, the inner part. These parts are interconnected. The nuclei are groups of brain cells that receive all kinds of information from the cortex. These nuclei in turn have connections to other brain areas that control movements, including eyelid closures. Essentially, the nuclei are the output center of the cerebellum. ... “The cerebellar cortex has long been regarded as the primary player in learning the reflex and timing of the eyelid closure. With this study, we show that well-timed eyelid closures can also be regulated by the cerebellar nuclei. " ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/rethinking-...bellar-nuclei/
    Now, on to future brains ...

    Twice As Powerful: Next-Gen AI Chip Mimics Human Brain for Power Savings

    Innovative new chip technology integrates data storage and processing, significantly boosting efficiency and performance. Inspired by the human brain, these chips, expected to be market-ready in three to five years, require interdisciplinary collaboration to meet industry security standards.

    https://scitechdaily.com/twice-as-po...power-savings/
    New Techniques From MIT and NVIDIA Revolutionize Sparse Tensor Acceleration for AI

    MIT and NVIDIA researchers have created two techniques to enhance sparse tensor processing, improving performance and energy efficiency in AI machine-learning models. These techniques optimize zero value handling, with HighLight accommodating a variety of sparsity patterns and Tailors and Swiftiles maximizing on-chip memory utilization through “overbooking.” The developments offer significant speed and energy usage improvements, enabling more specialized yet flexible hardware accelerators.

    https://scitechdaily.com/new-techniq...ration-for-ai/
    The Future of AI: Self-Learning Machines Could Replace Current Artificial Neural Networks

    Scientists at the Max Planck Institute have devised a more energy-efficient method for AI training, utilizing physical processes in neuromorphic computing. This approach, diverging from traditional digital neural networks, reduces energy consumption and optimizes training efficiency. The team is developing an optical neuromorphic computer to demonstrate this technology, aiming to significantly advance AI systems. ... New physics-based self-learning machines could replace the current artificial neural networks and save energy. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/the-future-...ural-networks/
    On the other hand, there is intelligence, and then there is intelligence ...

    The Limits of AI: Why ChatGPT Isn’t Truly “Intelligent”

    A new paper argues that AI’s intelligence, as seen in systems like ChatGPT, is fundamentally different from human intelligence due to its lack of embodiment and understanding. This difference highlights that AI does not share human concerns or connections with the world. ... ... AI cannot be intelligent in the way that humans are, even though “it can lie and BS like its maker.” ...

    ... According to our everyday use of the word, AI is definitely intelligent, but there are intelligent computers and have been for years, Chemero explains in a paper he co-authored in the journal Nature Human Behaviour. ... “LLMs generate impressive text, but often make things up whole cloth,” he states. “They learn to produce grammatical sentences, but require much, much more training than humans get. They don’t actually know what the things they say mean,” he says. “LLMs differ from human cognition because they are not embodied.” ...
    ...
    The main takeaway is that LLMs are not intelligent in the way that humans are because they “don’t give a damn,” Chemero says, adding “Things matter to us. We are committed to our survival. We care about the world we live in.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/the-limits-...y-intelligent/
    ... not yet anyway ...

    From Pixels to Paradigms: MIT’s Synthetic Leap in AI Training

    MIT’s StableRep system uses synthetic images from text-to-image models for machine learning, surpassing traditional real-image methods. It offers a deeper understanding of concepts and cost-effective training but faces challenges like potential biases and the need for initial real data training. ... “We’re teaching the model to learn more about high-level concepts through context and variance, not just feeding it data,” says Lijie Fan, MIT PhD student in electrical engineering, affiliate of the MIT Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL), lead researcher on the work. “When multiple images, all generated from the same text, all treated as depictions of the same underlying thing, the model dives deeper into the concepts behind the images, say the object, not just their pixels.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/from-pixels...n-ai-training/
    Misuse for politics ...

    China is using the world’s largest known online disinformation operation to harass Americans, a CNN review finds

    The Chinese government has built up the world’s largest known online disinformation operation and is using it to harass US residents, politicians, and businesses—at times threatening its targets with violence, a CNN review of court documents and public disclosures by social media companies has found.

    The onslaught of attacks – often of a vile and deeply personal nature – is part of a well-organized, increasingly brazen Chinese government intimidation campaign targeting people in the United States, documents show.

    The US State Department says the tactics are part of a broader multi-billion-dollar effort to shape the world’s information environment and silence critics of Beijing that has expanded under President Xi Jinping. ... Victims face a barrage of tens of thousands of social media posts that call them traitors, dogs, and racist and homophobic slurs. They say it’s all part of an effort to drive them into a state of constant fear and paranoia.

    Often, these victims don’t know where to turn. Some have spoken to law enforcement, including the FBI – but little has been done. While tech and social media companies have shut down thousands of accounts targeting these victims, they’re outpaced by a slew of new accounts emerging virtually every day. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/13/us/chi...nvs/index.html
    The sense of the separate "self" ... when and how does it develop? New answers:

    Four Months Old and Already Self-Aware: New Findings in Infant Psychology

    Research from the University of Birmingham shows that babies as young as four months can understand their body’s interaction with space. This study, involving a tactile and visual experiment, indicates that infants’ brains are capable of linking sight and touch, contributing to their spatial awareness. Further research is planned to investigate these abilities in newborns.

    ...
    Dr. Giulia Orioli, Research Fellow in Psychology at the University of Birmingham, who led the study said: “Our findings indicate that even in the first few months of life, before babies have even learned to reach for objects, the multisensory brain is wired up to make links between what babies see and what they feel. This means they can sense the space around them and understand how their bodies interact with that space. This is sometimes referred to as peripersonal space.

    “Of course, humans do this all the time as adults, using our combined senses to perceive where we are in space and making predictions about when we will touch an object or not. But now that we know that babies in the early stages of their development begin to show signs of this, it opens up questions about how much of these abilities are learned, or innate.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/four-months...nt-psychology/
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    Last edited by Jundo; 11-26-2023 at 02:42 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  24. #1024
    The universe keeps moving, the world turning, life living ... all is stillness ...

    Our galaxy’s black hole spins fast and drags space-time with it, scientists say

    The supermassive black hole at the center of our galaxy, Sagittarius A*, is spinning rapidly and altering space-time around it, a new study has found.

    Space-time is the four-dimensional continuum that describes how we see space, fusing one-dimensional time and three-dimensional space together to represent the space fabric that curves in response to massive celestial bodies. ... The researchers confirmed that the black hole is spinning, which causes what is known as the Lense-Thirring effect. Also known as frame dragging, the Lense-Thirring effect is what happens when a black hole drags space-time along with its spin ...

    ... “With this spin, Sagittarius A* will be dramatically altering the shape of space-time in its vicinity,” Daly said. “We’re used to thinking and living in a world where all the spatial dimensions are equivalent — the distance to the ceiling and the distance to the wall and the distance to the floor … they all sort of are linear ... “But if you have a rapidly rotating black hole, the space-time around it is not symmetric — the spinning black hole is dragging all of the space-time around with it … it squishes down the space-time, and it sort of looks like a football,” she said. ...

    BELOW: Sagitarrius A*


    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/28/world/...scn/index.html
    This void is empty too ...

    Is a Giant Void Driving the Universe Apart?

    The recent “Hubble tension” in cosmology, marked by conflicting expansion rate measurements, raises questions about the standard cosmological model. A new theory posits that a giant, underdense void could account for these discrepancies, challenging traditional views of matter distribution in the universe and suggesting a potential overhaul of Einstein’s gravitational theory.

    ... In our new paper, we present one possible explanation: that we live in a giant void in space (an area with below average density). We show that this could inflate local measurements through outflows of matter from the void. Outflows would arise when denser regions surrounding a void pull it apart – they’d exert a bigger gravitational pull than the lower density matter inside the void.

    In this scenario, we would need to be near the center of a void about a billion light years in radius and with density about 20% below the average for the universe as a whole – so not completely empty.

    Such a large and deep void is unexpected in the standard model – and therefore controversial. The CMB gives a snapshot of structure in the infant universe, suggesting that matter today should be rather uniformly spread out. However, directly counting the number of galaxies in different regions does indeed suggest we are in a local void. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/lost-in-spa...niverse-apart/
    May Hubble Be Healthy, and at ease in all its ills ...

    Hubble’s Hiccup: Gyro Issue Causes NASA To Suspend Telescope Operations

    ... NASA is working to resume science operations of the agency’s Hubble Space Telescope after it entered safe mode on November 23 due to an ongoing gyroscope (gyro) issue. Hubble’s instruments are stable, and the telescope is in good health. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/hubbles-hic...pe-operations/
    Too big for its britches ...

    Massive exoplanet orbiting small star upends planet formation theories

    ... Astronomers are questioning the theories of planet formation after discovering an exoplanet that technically shouldn’t exist.

    The planet, about the mass of Neptune and more than 13 times as massive as Earth, was detected orbiting an ultracool M-dwarf star called LHS 3154 — which is nine times less massive than our sun. An M-dwarf star is the smallest and coolest type of star.

    The planet — dubbed LHS 3154b — closely whips around the star, completing one orbit every 3.7 Earth days, making it the most massive known planet in a close orbit around one of the coldest, low-mass stars in the universe, according to a new study published Thursday in the journal Science. It upends how scientists understand the formation of planetary systems. ...

    ... This graphic compares the sizes of our sun and Earth with the smaller, cooler LHS 3154 star and its orbiting planet, LHS 3154b.


    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/30/world/...scn/index.html
    Big is small, small is big ...

    Predictions of quantum field theory experimentally confirmed for the first time.

    Entanglement is a quantum phenomenon where the properties of two or more particles become interconnected in such a way that one cannot assign a definite state to each individual particle anymore. Rather, we have to consider all particles at once that share a certain state. The entanglement of the particles ultimately determines the properties of a material. ... “We have developed a more efficient description, that allows us to extract entanglement information from the system with drastically fewer measurements,” explains theoretical physicist Rick van Bijnen. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/unlocking-t...ted-phenomena/
    We are the rivers, we are the earth ...

    Tectonic Tales of Life: How Geology Has Influenced Evolution for the Past 500 Million Years

    The movement of rivers, mountains, oceans, and sediment nutrients at the geological timescale are central drivers of Earth’s biodiversity, new research recently published in Nature reveals. The research also shows that biodiversity evolves at rates similar to the pace of plate tectonics, the slow geological processes shaping continents, mountains, and oceans.

    “That is a rate incomparably slower than the current rates of extinction caused by human activity,” said lead author Dr Tristan Salles from the School of Geosciences.

    The research looks back over 500 million years of Earth’s history to the period just after the Cambrian explosion of life, which established the main species types of modern life.

    Dr Salles said: “Earth’s surface is the living skin of our planet. Over geological time, this surface evolves with rivers fragmenting the landscape into an environmentally diverse range of habitats.

    “However, these rivers not only carve canyons and form valleys, but play the role of Earth’s circulatory system as the main conduits for nutrient and sediment transfer from sources (mountains) to sinks (oceans). While modern science has a growing understanding of global biodiversity, we tend to view this through the prism of narrow expertise,” Dr Salles said. “This is like looking inside a house from just one window and thinking we understand its architecture. Our model connects physical, chemical, and biological systems over half a billion years in five-million-year chunks at a resolution of five kilometers. This gives an unprecedented understanding of what has driven the shape and timing of species diversity,” he said. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/tectonic-ta...million-years/
    Alas, our circulatory system is drying up ... and we watch ...

    Global Drought Catastrophe: UN Uncovers “An Unprecedented Emergency on a Planetary Scale”

    The UN’s report on global drought, revealed at COP28, highlights the severe and often overlooked consequences of droughts. It presents alarming data on drought impacts worldwide, including agriculture, water resources, and economic losses. The report calls for urgent action and international cooperation to build global drought resilience through sustainable practices and efficient resource management.

    https://scitechdaily.com/global-drou...anetary-scale/
    Global warming is also an addiction ... excess desires ... clinging ... neurostimulation could help ...

    Unmasking Addiction: Scientists Discover Common Brain Network Among People With Substance Use Disorder

    Researchers at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, part of the Mass General Brigham healthcare system, have conducted a study indicating the presence of a common brain network in individuals with substance use disorder. This conclusion was drawn from an analysis of data from over 144 studies on addiction.

    The research revealed that regardless of the substance or lesion location, abnormalities in substance use disorders mapped to a shared brain network. This discovery opens up possibilities for targeting this specific brain circuit with neurostimulation therapies. The study’s findings have been published in the journal Nature Mental Health. ...

    ... It also looked at different substances and found the network was common, whether someone was addicted to nicotine, alcohol, cocaine, or heroin. ...

    ... Fox said that despite the extensive data points, narrowing down a specific circuit fills in a gap from previous studies done in the Center for Brain Circuit Therapeutics, bringing targeted neurostimulation to treat addiction, like transcranial magnetic stimulation, closer to patients in a clinical setting. ... https://scitechdaily.com/unmasking-a...-use-disorder/
    A small study shows another way to treat our excess desires ...

    Recent research indicates that semaglutide, a drug used for diabetes and weight loss, could effectively reduce symptoms of Alcohol Use Disorder.

    ... The paper is titled “Significant Decrease in Alcohol Use Disorder Symptoms Secondary to Semaglutide Therapy for Weight Loss: A Case Series.” This collaboration has the potential to impact the lives of individuals struggling with Alcohol Use Disorder. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/diabetes-an...dible-new-use/
    CRISPR gets more snap ...

    CRISPR’s Hidden Treasures: 188 New Systems Unveiled by Smart Algorithm

    Researchers at MIT, the Broad Institute, and the National Institutes of Health have developed a new search algorithm that has identified 188 kinds of new rare CRISPR systems in bacterial genomes. ...

    By analyzing bacterial data, researchers have discovered thousands of rare new CRISPR systems that have a range of functions and could enable gene editing, diagnostics, and more. ... The scientists found a surprising number and diversity of CRISPR systems, including ones that could make edits to DNA in human cells, others that can target RNA, and many with a variety of other functions. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/crisprs-hid...art-algorithm/
    Using out brains to see our brains better ...

    Brain Imaging Redefined: NexGen 7T MRI Achieves 10x Better Resolution

    Higher resolution will allow neuroscientists to more precisely localize and trace brain networks.

    An intense international effort to improve the resolution of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for studying the human brain has culminated in an ultra-high resolution 7 Tesla scanner that records up to 10 times more detail than current 7T scanners and over 50 times more detail than current 3T scanners, the mainstay of most hospitals.

    BELOW: Cross-sectional diagram of the NexGen 7T scanner, showing the new Impulse head-only gradient coil (green) and receiver-transmit coil (white) resting on a movable bed (brown) and connected to an electronic interface (blue) containing nearly a thousand wires (blue) that extend out of the magnet.


    https://scitechdaily.com/brain-imagi...er-resolution/
    But we really don't need a brain for everything ...

    Brain Not Required: Brittle Stars Showcase Surprising Learning Abilities

    Recent research led by Julia Notar at Duke University reveals that brittle stars, despite lacking brains, can learn through experience. These marine creatures, related to starfish, use their nerve cords to learn by association, a concept demonstrated in classical conditioning. ... “There’s no processing center,” said lead author Julia Notar, who did the research as part of her biology Ph.D. in professor Sönke Johnsen’s lab at Duke University.

    “Each of the nerve cords can act independently,” Notar said. “It’s like instead of a boss, there’s a committee.” ...

    BELOW: This time-lapse video shows a classical conditioning experiment Duke researchers conducted to see if brittle stars – which don’t have brains – could learn. Every time the lights went dim, the researchers put a pipette with a morsel of shrimp in the animals’ tanks. Over time the animals learned that “lights out” was a dinner bell call to come for dinner.


    https://scitechdaily.com/brain-not-r...ing-abilities/
    Are they alive? Art they robots?

    Tiny living robots made from human cells surprise scientists


    Scientists have created tiny living robots from human cells that can move around in a lab dish and may one day be able to help heal wounds or damaged tissue, according to a new study.

    A team at Tufts University and Harvard University’s Wyss Institute have dubbed these creations anthrobots. The research builds on earlier work from some of the same scientists, who made the first living robots, or xenobots, from stem cells sourced from embryos of the African clawed frog (Xenopus laevis). ...

    ... While alive, the anthrobots were not full-fledged organisms because they didn’t have a full life cycle, Levin said.

    “It reminds us that these harsh binary categories that we’ve operated with: Is that a robot, is that an animal, is that a machine? These kinds of things don’t serve us very well. We need to get beyond that.” ...

    ... “In our method, each anthrobot grows from a single cell.”

    It’s this self-assembly that makes them unique. Biological robots have been made by other scientists, but they were constructed by hand by making a mold and seeding cells to live on top of it, Levin said. ...

    ... The multicellular robots, ranging in size from the width of a human hair to the point of a sharpened pencil, were made to self-assemble and shown to have a remarkable healing effect on other cells. The discovery is a starting point for the researchers’ vision to use patient-derived biobots as new therapeutic tools for regeneration, healing, and treatment of disease. ...

    ... The experiments outlined in this latest study are at an early stage, but the goal is to find out whether the anthrobots could have medical applications, Levin and Gumuskaya said. To see whether such applications might be possible, researchers examined whether the anthrobots were able to move over human neurons grown in a lab dish that had been “scratched” to mimic damage.

    They were surprised to see the anthrobots encouraged growth to the damaged region of the neurons, although the researchers don’t yet understand the healing mechanism, the study noted. ...

    ... “By reprogramming interactions between cells, new multicellular structures can be created, analogous to the way stone and brick can be arranged into different structural elements like walls, archways or columns.” The researchers found that not only could the cells create new multicellular shapes, but they could move in different ways over a surface of human neurons grown in a lab dish and encourage new growth to fill in gaps caused by scratching the layer of cells. ...

    BELOW: A swarm of anthrobots ...


    https://us.cnn.com/2023/11/30/world/...scn/index.html
    Another new biomedical tool ...

    The Fast and the Luminous: First Visible Wavelength Femtosecond Fiber Laser Developed

    Researchers have recently developed the first fiber laser capable of producing femtosecond pulses in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum. This advancement holds potential for various biomedical and material processing applications. The unique feature of these lasers is their ability to produce ultrashort, bright visible-wavelength pulses, a significant step forward in laser technology. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/the-fast-an...ser-developed/
    We are children of bacteria ...

    Sophisticated Microbial Metropolis: Revealing Bacterial Teamwork Across Generations

    When bacteria build communities, they cooperate and share nutrients across generations. Researchers at the University of Basel have now successfully demonstrated this for the first time using a newly developed method. This innovative technique enables the tracking of gene expression during the development of bacterial communities over space and time. ... The development of bacterial communities is a highly complex process where bacteria form intricate three-dimensional structures. In their latest study published on November 16 in the journal Nature Microbiology, the team led by Professor Knut Drescher from the Biozentrum of the University of Basel has investigated the development of bacterial swarm communities in detail. ... This study illustrates the complexity and dynamics within bacterial communities and reveals cooperative interactions among individual bacteria — in favor of the community. The spatial and temporal effects thus play a central role in the development and establishment of microbial communities. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/sophisticat...s-generations/
    Right under our feet ... and maybe martian feet too ...

    Unveiling Earth’s Hidden World: Scientists Map Vast Subsurface Microbial Universe

    If you totaled the mass of all microbes dwelling beneath the Earth’s surface, their combined biomass would surpass that of all life in our oceans.

    However, due to the challenge of accessing these depths, this teeming underground life remains largely unexplored and poorly understood. Utilizing a repurposed goldmine in South Dakota’s Black Hills as a laboratory, researchers from Northwestern University have crafted the most comprehensive map yet of these elusive and unusual microbes beneath our feet.

    In total, the researchers characterized nearly 600 microbial genomes — some of which are new to science. Out of this batch, Northwestern geoscientist Magdalena Osburn, who led the study, says most microbes fit into one of two categories: “minimalists,” which have streamlined their lives by eating the same thing all day, every day; and “maximalists,” which are ready and prepared to greedily grab any resource that might come their way. ...

    ... The minimalists, Osburn explained, typically share resources with friends, which also have specialized jobs. ... “Some of these lineages don’t even have genes to make their own lipids, which blows my mind,” Osburn said. “Because how can you make a cell without lipids? It’s sort of like how humans can’t make every amino acid, so we eat protein to get the amino acids that we cannot make on our own. But this is on a more extreme scale. The minimalists are extreme specialists, and all together, they make it work. It’s a lot of sharing and no duplication of effort.” ...

    ... Not only does the new study expand our knowledge of the microbes living deep within the subsurface, it also hints at potential life we someday might find on Mars. Because the microbes live on resources found within rocks and water that are physically separate from the surface, these organisms also potentially could survive buried within Mars’ dusty red depths. ... “I get really excited when I see evidence of microbial life, doing its thing without us, without plants, without oxygen, without surface atmosphere,” she said. “These kinds of life very well could exist deep within Mars or in the oceans of icy moons right now. The forms of life tell us about what might live elsewhere in the solar system.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/unveiling-e...bial-universe/
    It is sure easier to preserve species than to put them back ... but I think the dodo is a no go ...

    Not so dead as a dodo: ‘De-extinction’ plan to reintroduce bird to Mauritius

    An audacious collaboration between geneticists and conservationists plans to bring back the extinct dodo and reintroduce it to its once-native habitat in Mauritius.

    US-based biotechnology and genetic engineering company Colossal Biosciences, which is pursuing the “de-extinction” of multiple species, including the woolly mammoth, has entered a partnership with the Mauritian Wildlife Foundation to find a suitable location for the large flightless birds.

    The dodo has been extinct since 1681; a combination of predation by humans and animals introduced by humans led to its downfall, turning it into a textbook case for extinction. But according to the partners, its return to Mauritius could benefit the dodo’s immediate environment and other species. ...

    ... One lingering question is “why?” Why pool resources into recreating a long-dead, flightless bird and sequestering it on an island in the middle of the Indian Ocean?

    Ben Lamm, CEO and co-founder of Colossal, argued that “restoring the dodo gives us the opportunity to create ‘conservation optimism,’ that hopefully inspires people around the globe, specifically the youth, in a time when climate change, biodiversity loss and politics can make things seem hopeless.”

    He added that the techniques pioneered by the dodo project could help restore other avian species. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/dodo-de-extinctio...scn/index.html
    AI, MRI and autism ...

    Pioneering AI Technology Diagnoses Autism in Children Under Two With 98.5% Accuracy

    A groundbreaking AI system now diagnoses autism in children under two years old with 98.5% accuracy using brain MRIs, paving the way for earlier, more effective treatment and management of autism.

    https://scitechdaily.com/pioneering-...98-5-accuracy/
    Crystal Clear AI: Revolutionizing the Future of Electronics Manufacturing

    Nagoya University researchers have trained an AI to predict the orientation of crystal grains in polycrystalline materials using optical images, significantly reducing analysis time from 14 hours to 1.5 hours. This advancement, detailed in APL Machine Learning, promises to revolutionize the use of these materials in industries like electronics and solar energy.

    https://scitechdaily.com/crystal-cle...manufacturing/
    HuGE AI Breakthrough: Using Crowdsourced Feedback in Robot Training

    A novel reinforcement learning method, HuGE, developed by MIT, Harvard, and the University of Washington researchers, uses crowdsourced feedback to efficiently teach AI agents complex tasks, showing promising results in both simulations and real-world applications. ...

    ... To teach an AI agent a new task, like how to open a kitchen cabinet, researchers often use reinforcement learning — a trial-and-error process where the agent is rewarded for taking actions that get it closer to the goal.

    In many instances, a human expert must carefully design a reward function, which is an incentive mechanism that gives the agent motivation to explore. The human expert must iteratively update that reward function as the agent explores and tries different actions. This can be time-consuming, inefficient, and difficult to scale up, especially when the task is complex and involves many steps. ...

    ... Researchers from MIT, Harvard University, and the University of Washington have developed a new reinforcement learning approach that doesn’t rely on an expertly designed reward function. Instead, it leverages crowdsourced feedback, gathered from many nonexpert users, to guide the agent as it learns to reach its goal.

    While some other methods also attempt to utilize nonexpert feedback, this new approach enables the AI agent to learn more quickly, despite the fact that data crowdsourced from users are often full of errors. These noisy data might cause other methods to fail. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/huge-ai-bre...obot-training/
    The future, right here in Ibaraki, Japan ...

    World’s biggest experimental nuclear fusion reactor launched in Japan

    The world’s biggest operational experimental nuclear fusion reactor – a technology in its infancy but billed by some as the answer to humanity’s future energy needs – has been inaugurated in Naka, Japan.

    Fusion differs from fission, the technique used in nuclear power plants, by fusing two atomic nuclei instead of splitting one.

    The goal of the JT-60SA reactor is to investigate the feasibility of fusion as a safe, large-scale and carbon-free source of net energy – with more energy generated than is put into producing it.

    The six-storey-high machine, in a hangar in Naka, north of Tokyo, comprises a doughnut-shaped “tokamak” vessel set to contain swirling plasma heated to 200 million degrees Celsius.

    It is a joint project between the European Union and Japan, and is the forerunner for its big brother in France, the under-construction International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER).


    https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...hpbvYqg-M081M4
    Bitcoin ... blackchain ... bad ... especially with that drought ...

    Cryptocurrency’s Thirst: A Single Bitcoin Transaction Consumes a Pool’s Worth of Water

    Bitcoin mining’s extensive water use is worsening the global water crisis, especially in drought-prone regions, according to Alex de Vries. He suggests potential solutions, including renewable energy, but notes the challenges in their implementation.

    ... In the Bitcoin network, miners make about 350 quintillion—that is, 350 followed by 18 zeros—guesses every second of the day, an activity that consumes a tremendous amount of computing power.

    “The right answer emerges every 10 minutes, and the rest of the data, quintillions of them, are computations that serve no further purpose and are therefore immediately discarded,” de Vries says.

    During the same process, a large amount of water is used to cool the computers at large data centers. Based on data from previous research, de Vries calculates that Bitcoin mining consumes about 8.6 to 35.1 gigaliters (GL) of water per year in the U.S. In addition to cooling computers, coal- and gas-fired power plants that provide electricity to run the computers also use water to lower the temperature. This cooling water is evaporated and not available to be reused. Water evaporated from hydropower plants also adds to the water footprint of Bitcoin’s power demand.

    ... In total, de Vries estimates that in 2021, Bitcoin mining consumed over 1,600 GL of water worldwide. Each transaction on the Bitcoin blockchain uses 16,000 liters of water on average, about 6.2 million times more than a credit card swipe, or enough to fill a backyard swimming pool. Bitcoin’s water consumption is expected to increase to 2,300 GL in 2023, de Vries says,

    In the U.S., Bitcoin mining consumes about 93 GL to 120 GL of water every year, equivalent to the average water consumption of 300,000 U.S. households or a city like Washington, D.C. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/cryptocurre...orth-of-water/
    AI, in shy Japan, is even picking our spouses ...

    1 in 4 newlyweds in Japan met on matching apps, equaling workplace encounters: survey

    One in four couples who got married in the past year in Japan met through matching apps, the same proportion as those who met at work, a survey conducted by Meiji Yasuda Life Insurance Co. has found. ... A total of 25% of those who got married in the past year answered they met their spouse through "matching apps" while the same proportion cited "colleagues, seniors or juniors at work." These responses were followed by "introductions by friends or acquaintances" at 13.5%, "school classmates, seniors or juniors" at 9.4%, and "marriage hunting parties or events" at 7.3%. "Introduction of prospective marriage partners" and "pickups" accounted for 1% each.

    The top reasons for those who have used matching apps for marriage, with multiple answers allowed, were "because it is easy to meet people" and "because I can't meet prospective partners at work" at 46.7% each, followed by "because I can choose the partner of my choice," at 41.7%. ...

    https://mainichi.jp/english/articles...0m/0na/013000c
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  25. #1025
    This is huge

    GNoME’s discovery of 2.2 million materials would be equivalent to about 800 years’ worth of knowledge and demonstrates an unprecedented scale and level of accuracy in predictions.
    https://deepmind.google/discover/blo...deep-learning/

  26. #1026
    Thank goodness for this opportunity to share my gratitude to our community and to you who have helped us spread this information and help others in need.
    Gassho
    Sat/lah


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Peaceful Poet, Tai Shi. Ubasoku; calm, supportive, limited to positive 優婆塞 台 婆

  27. #1027

    A unified theory?

    Reimagining the Cosmos: New Theory Unites Einstein’s Gravity With Quantum Mechanics

    A radical theory that consistently unifies gravity and quantum mechanics while preserving Einstein’s classical concept of spacetime is announced today in two papers published simultaneously by UCL (University College London) physicists. ... [The] new theory challenges the foundations of modern physics by suggesting that spacetime is classical, not quantum. This theory predicts larger spacetime fluctuations, impacting object weights. Proposed experiments, like measuring a 1kg mass for weight fluctuations, aim to test this groundbreaking concept, potentially revolutionizing our understanding of gravity and spacetime. ...

    ... The prevailing assumption has been that Einstein’s theory of gravity must be modified, or “quantized,” in order to fit within quantum theory. This is the approach of two leading candidates for a quantum theory of gravity, string theory and loop quantum gravity.

    But a new theory, developed by Professor Jonathan Oppenheim (UCL Physics & Astronomy) and laid out in a new paper in Physical Review X (PRX), challenges that consensus and takes an alternative approach by suggesting that spacetime may be classical – that is, not governed by quantum theory at all. ...

    ... Instead of modifying spacetime, the theory – dubbed a “postquantum theory of classical gravity” – modifies quantum theory and predicts an intrinsic breakdown in predictability that is mediated by spacetime itself. This results in random and violent fluctuations in spacetime that are larger than envisaged under quantum theory, rendering the apparent weight of objects unpredictable if measured precisely enough. ... “In both quantum gravity and classical gravity, spacetime must be undergoing violent and random fluctuations all around us, but on a scale which we haven’t yet been able to detect. But if spacetime is classical, the fluctuations have to be larger than a certain scale, and this scale can be determined by another experiment where we test how long we can put a heavy atom in superposition* of being in two different locations.”

    https://scitechdaily.com/reimagining...tum-mechanics/
    Thick as a brick ...

    New details on a mysterious Milky Way region called ‘The Brick’ reveal it’s even stranger than scientists thought

    ... A box-shaped cloud of opaque dust that lies at the center of our galaxy has long perplexed scientists, and observations that reveal a new detail about its composition are deepening the mystery — possibly upending what’s known about how stars form.

    The cloud, nicknamed “the Brick” for its visual impenetrability and rectangular appearance, was previously estimated to hold more than 100,000 times the mass of the sun. And such a dense blob should be churning out massive new stars, based on researchers’ current understanding of star formation.

    But it’s not.

    The Brick is largely dormant. And the latest observations, made using the James Webb Space Telescope, did not reveal any hidden, young stars. ...

    BELOW: an infrared view of the frenzied scene at the center of our Milky Way and revealing what lies behind the dust. "The Brick" is the dark blob at the center of the image, and the more advanced James Webb Space Telescope is offering researchers a closer look.

    https://scitechdaily.com/galactic-pa...-of-the-brick/
    and
    https://us.cnn.com/2023/12/07/world/...scn/index.html


    Blowing in the wind ...

    Galactic Gales: Unraveling the Cosmic Winds Shaping Our Universe

    Astronomers using the MUSE instrument on the ESO’s Very Large Telescope, have discovered that galactic winds, which limit galaxy growth and star formation, are a universal phenomenon in galaxies over 7 billion years old. These winds, formed from massive star explosions, are difficult to detect due to their low density but were mapped using magnesium atom emission

    ... Galactic winds are created by the explosion of massive stars. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/galactic-ga...-our-universe/
    A Thanksgiving Parade ...

    Galaxies on Parade: The Stunning Stellar Show From Hubble

    This image features an interacting galaxy system known as Arp-Madore 2105-332, which lies about 200 million light-years from Earth in the constellation Microscopium. Like other recent Hubble Pictures of the Week, this system belongs to the Arp-Madore catalog of peculiar galaxies.

    The wonderful quality of this image also reveals several further galaxies, not associated with this system but fortuitously positioned in such a way that they appear to be forming a line that approaches the leftmost (in this image) component of Arp-Madore 2105-332 ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/galaxies-on...w-from-hubble/

    Let us hope for a cure ...

    Teen is one of the first in the world to get his genes edited. Why he describes the process as 'cool and freaky'

    CNN's Meg Tirrell sits down with Johnny Lubin, one of the first in the world to try a new kind of medicine that uses a gene-editing tool called CRISPR to offer a potential cure for sickle cell disease.


    https://us.cnn.com/videos/health/202...-cnntm-vpx.cnn
    Another treatment ...

    Reviving Minds: Implant Restores Cognitive Functions After Brain Injury

    A new technique using deep brain stimulation tailored to each patient exceeded researchers’ expectations in treating the cognitive impairments from moderate to severe traumatic brain injury.

    ... After receiving a traumatic brain injury in a car accident, Gina Arata was unable to focus well enough to read. A device implanted in her brain has improved her ability to focus, her memory and her mood. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/reviving-mi...-brain-injury/
    Robot surgeon ...

    Magnetic surgical robot makes international debut in Chile hospital

    A robot that uses powerful magnets to perform less invasive and more efficient surgeries completed its first international procedure, a gallbladder removal, at a public hospital in Chile this week, according to the company that developed the technology.

    The MARS surgical platform at the Luis Tisne hospital in Santiago allows surgeons to "attach a small magnet to organs, like the liver, and use robotic arms with high powered magnets on the patient’s belly to manipulate organs out of the way," according to Levita Magnetics, the California-based start-up that created robot.

    https://www.reuters.com/science/magn...al-2023-12-06/

    Cellular origami ...

    Cracking the Cellular Code: New Insights Into Protein Folding and Disease Therapies

    A groundbreaking study at UMass Amherst has decoded how sugars attached to proteins guide their correct folding, shedding light on potential treatments for diseases caused by protein misfolding. ... While we often think of diseases as caused by foreign bodies—bacteria or viruses—there are hundreds of diseases affecting humans that result from errors in cellular production of its proteins. A team of researchers led by the University of Massachusetts Amherst recently leveraged the power of cutting-edge technology, including an innovative technique called glycoproteomics, to unlock the carbohydrate-based code that governs how certain classes of proteins form themselves into the complex shapes necessary to keep us healthy.

    ,,, Scientists once thought that the single code governing life was DNA, and that everything was governed by how DNA’s four building blocks—A, C, G and T—combined and recombined. But in recent decades, it has become clear that there are other codes at work, and especially in building the intricately folded, secreted proteins that are created in the human cell’s protein factory, the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), a membrane-enclosed compartment where protein folding begins. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/cracking-th...ase-therapies/
    Getting into small jeans via the genes ...

    Outsmarting Obesity: How One Genetic Variant Could Ward Off Weight Gain

    A study by Weill Cornell Medicine shows a genetic variant in the GIP receptor could aid in obesity resistance by enhancing metabolism and insulin release, potentially guiding new treatments.

    A preclinical study by Weill Cornell Medicine investigators shows that a specific human genetic variant of a receptor that stimulates insulin release may help individuals be more resistant to obesity. The researchers discovered that this variant behaves differently in the cell which may contribute to more efficient metabolism.

    https://scitechdaily.com/outsmarting...f-weight-gain/
    We are a bunch of dopes ...

    Brain’s Reward Pathway Unlocked: Revealing the Secrets of the Dopaminergic System

    Scientists developed a revolutionary organoid model of the dopaminergic system, providing significant insights into Parkinson’s disease and the long-lasting effects of cocaine on the brain. This model is a promising tool for advancing Parkinson’s disease treatments and understanding the enduring impact of drug addiction.

    https://scitechdaily.com/brains-rewa...nergic-system/
    mRNA is here to stay ...

    Rewriting the Code: Enhancing Safety in Future mRNA Treatments

    Recent studies have highlighted a challenge in mRNA therapeutics: the tendency of cellular machinery to misinterpret modified mRNA sequences, causing unintended immune responses. Researchers are now refining mRNA vaccine designs to prevent these ‘off-target’ effects, ensuring the future safety and effectiveness of these groundbreaking treatments. ... They have identified the sequence within the mRNA that causes this to occur and found a way to prevent ‘off-target’ immune responses to enable the safer design of future mRNA therapeutics. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/rewriting-t...na-treatments/
    Monkey Brain Baby Brain ...

    Rethinking Evolution: The Surprising Truth About Newborn Brain Development

    A new study challenges the belief that human newborns have significantly less developed brains than other primates. The study found that humans are born at a typical development level for primates, but their brains grow more after birth, leading to the impression of underdevelopment. This discovery alters the understanding of human brain evolution, showing that brain plasticity in humans is likely not due to being born less developed than other primates.

    ... The research challenges a prevailing understanding of evolutionary human brain development. Up to now, because of their helplessness and poor muscle control, it’s long been believed that humans are born with comparatively less developed brains than other primates. This was thought to be the result of an evolutionary compromise so babies’ heads could fit through their mother’s birth canal, which would require them to further develop outside of the womb.

    Based on this understanding, scientists suggested that because humans emerged comparatively underdeveloped, their brains are more malleable in the earliest period of life and more easily affected by environmental stimuli as they grow. It was thought that this underdevelopment at birth encouraged greater brain plasticity, ultimately facilitating human intelligence. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/rethinking-...n-development/
    How our brain became our brain ...

    Redefining Brain Evolution: Unveiling the “Little Brain’s” Role in the Human Cognitive Leap

    Heidelberg University researchers have mapped the cerebellum’s development in humans, mice, and opossums, uncovering its complex structure and significant role in human cognitive evolution. Their findings offer insights into brain development and diseases, with a focus on Purkinje cells and genetic variations over 160 million years. ... The advancement of higher cognitive abilities in humans is predominantly associated with the growth of the neocortex, a brain area key to conscious thinking, movement, and sensory perception. Researchers are increasingly realizing, however, that the “little brain” or cerebellum also expanded during evolution and probably contributes to the capacities unique to humans ... “Although the cerebellum, a structure at the back of the skull, contains about 80 percent of all neurons in the whole human brain, this was long considered a brain region with a rather simple cellular architecture,” explains Prof. Kaessmann. In recent times, however, evidence suggesting a pronounced heterogeneity within this structure has been growing, says the molecular biologist. ...


    https://scitechdaily.com/redefining-...ognitive-leap/
    From head, now to toe ...

    Arch Rivals: How Human Feet Differ From Our Primate Cousins – “Masterpiece of Evolution”

    A comprehensive study reveals new insights into the evolution and complexity of the human foot, focusing on the medial longitudinal arch and its significance in differentiating Homo sapiens from primates. ... The longitudinal arch is a functional adaptation that allows the foot to switch from a shock absorber function to lever during the phases of contact and detachment with the ground, a mechanism that allows us to have an efficient bipedal walk. Despite its importance, however, it is still unclear when this characteristic appeared in the course of our evolutionary history. The topic of “flat feet” complicates the picture even more: it is a widespread condition that consists in a more or less pronounced flattening of the medial longitudinal arch ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/arch-rivals...-of-evolution/
    Bunch of immigrants, send em back ...

    Who Were the First Modern Humans To Settle in Europe? Scientists Shed New Light

    Before the permanent settlement of modern humans in Europe, other human populations migrated from Africa to Europe around 60,000 years ago. However, they did not establish long-term settlements. Around 40,000 years ago, a significant climate crisis, along with a super-eruption from the Phlegraean Fields volcanic region near present-day Naples, led to a decrease in the early European populations. ... To determine who the first modern humans to settle definitively in Europe were, a team led by CNRS scientists analyzed the genome of two skull fragments from the Buran Kaya III site in Crimea dating to 36,000 and 37,000 years ago. By comparing them to DNA sequences from human genome databases, they revealed the genetic proximity between these individuals and both current and ancient Europeans, especially those associated with the Gravettian culture, known for producing female figurines referred to as “Venuses”, whose apogee in Europe came between 31,000 and 23,000 years ago.

    https://scitechdaily.com/who-were-th...hed-new-light/
    Technology on the run ...

    AI Revolution in Neuroscience: Precise Tracking of Neurons in Moving Animals

    A groundbreaking AI method created by EPFL and Harvard scientists allows for efficient tracking of neurons in moving animals, using a convolutional neural network with ‘targeted augmentation’. This significantly reduces manual annotation, accelerating brain imaging research and deepening our understanding of neural behaviors. ... Recent advances allow imaging of neurons inside freely moving animals. However, to decode circuit activity, these imaged neurons must be computationally identified and tracked. This becomes particularly challenging when the brain itself moves and deforms inside an organism’s flexible body, e.g. in a worm. Until now, the scientific community has lacked the tools to address the problem. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/ai-revoluti...oving-animals/
    Google launches Gemini, its most-advanced AI model yet, as it races to compete with ChatGPT

    Google on Wednesday launched its most ambitious effort yet to compete in the rapidly growing field of generative artificial intelligence, launching an AI model known as Gemini that’s designed to compete with the likes of OpenAI’s GPT models and supercharge everything from Google’s consumer apps to Android smartphones.

    The scope of Google’s ambitions were reflected in the company’s announcement, which introduced Gemini as the company’s “largest and most capable AI model” and declared a “Gemini era” that foresees the tech giant’s model being used in every setting, from big companies to consumer devices such as the Google Pixel 8 Pro.

    Unlike existing AI models that typically deal with only one type of user prompt, such as exclusively images or text, Gemini was built to be “multimodal,” Google said. This means it accepts inputs that include multiple types of media, combining text, images, audio, video and programming code.

    ... Wednesday’s launch was also designed to showcase Google’s advances in cloud computing, a critical resource for AI developers. The company said it trained Gemini using a new generation of powerful cloud-based processors that can collectively train large AI models nearly three times faster than the prior version. ...

    In its testing, Google’s Gemini model outperformed rival AI models across more than two dozen benchmarks commonly used by AI researchers to evaluate an algorithm’s reading comprehension, mathematical ability, and multistep reasoning skills, the company said. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/12/06/tech/g...gpt/index.html
    The last of plastic? ...

    New Catalyst Completely Breaks Down Durable Plastic Pollution in Minutes

    New process recovers 99% of monomers (shown here), nylon’s building blocks. After recovering monomers, industry can upcycle nylon into higher-value products. ... Northwestern University chemists have developed a new catalyst that quickly, cleanly, and completely breaks down Nylon-6 in a matter of minutes — without generating harmful byproducts. Even better: The process does not require toxic solvents, expensive materials, or extreme conditions, making it practical for everyday applications. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/new-catalys...on-in-minutes/
    ... if it is not too late ...

    Life on Earth Is in Danger – New Report Reveals That Earth’s Vital Signs Have Deteriorated to Levels Unprecedented in Human History

    A team of international climate scientists has published a recent report warning of unprecedented environmental threats due to worsening Earth’s vital signs. The report shows alarming climate change indicators and calls for urgent policy changes. It emphasizes the need for an equitable approach to climate action, focusing on reducing overconsumption and emissions, particularly by wealthier nations.

    https://scitechdaily.com/life-on-ear...human-history/
    One small step to a healthier earth ... Meatier non-meat ...

    Scientists Discover Natural Way To Make Plant-Based Meat More “Meaty”

    Recent research reveals that fermenting alliums like onions with fungi can naturally mimic meat flavors, offering a promising solution for enhancing plant-based meat alternatives without synthetic additives.

    Plant-based substitutes like tempeh and bean burgers offer protein-packed choices for individuals looking to cut down on meat. However, mimicking the taste and smell of meat is difficult, and many companies use artificial additives for this purpose. A recent study in ACS’ Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry has revealed a promising solution: onions, chives, and leeks can generate natural compounds similar to meat’s savory flavors when fermented with typical fungi.

    https://scitechdaily.com/scientists-...at-more-meaty/
    And speaking of meat eating ... an announcement from here in Tsukuba ... dog it dog, dinosaur eat dinosaur ...

    Dinosaur fossil finds prey in stomach, first for tyrannosaurid, University of Tsukuba and Hokkaido University

    On the 11th, the University of Tsukuba and Hokkaido University announced that the entire skeleton of a juvenile carnivorous dinosaur, Gorgosaurus, was found with prey left in its stomach. This is the world's first confirmed fossil of a tyrannosaurid with stomach contents. The discovery is direct evidence of the previously unknown feeding habits of juveniles, and supports the hypothesis that their feeding habits change as they grow.

    According to the University of Tsukuba and others, the fossil was discovered in the late Cretaceous period (approximately 75.3 million years ago) in southern Alberta, Canada. It is estimated to be about 4 meters long and between 5 and 7 years old.

    Inside its stomach were the legs of two small dinosaurs. It is believed that the animals were eaten at different times because their digestion was different.

    https://ibarakinews.jp/news/newsdeta...17022935441003
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  28. #1028
    Watching reptiles eat whole prey is eye opening. I am sure Dinosaurs perfected that. They also ate a lot of mammals (our ancestors). The hypothesis is that extinction of Dinosaurs allowed mammals to become us 65 million years later

    Doshin
    Stlah

  29. #1029
    Quote Originally Posted by Doshin View Post
    Watching reptiles eat whole prey is eye opening. I am sure Dinosaurs perfected that. They also ate a lot of mammals (our ancestors). The hypothesis is that extinction of Dinosaurs allowed mammals to become us 65 million years later

    Doshin
    Stlah
    They did eat us ... and we have visual proof ...


    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  30. #1030
    Wow. That changes all my evolutionary education. How did they miss that video?

    Guess my schools weren’t keeping up with new data

    Doshin
    Stlah

  31. #1031
    This stone battery technology is HOT! ... worth a watch ...

    Energy storage of the future? 'Hot rocks' in a box

    A new "thermal battery" prototype in Fresno, California, could be the energy storage of the future.

    https://us.cnn.com/videos/us/2023/12...kg-ctm-vpx.cnn
    Celebrating Enceladus ...

    Life may have everything it needs to exist on Saturn’s moon Enceladus

    Scientists have long viewed Saturn’s moon Enceladus, which harbors an ocean beneath its thick, icy shell, as one of the best places to search for life beyond Earth.

    Now, a new analysis of data collected by NASA’s Cassini mission, which orbited Saturn and its moons between 2004 and 2017, has uncovered intriguing evidence that further supports the idea of Enceladus as a habitable ocean world. ... The latest data analysis of Cassini’s flybys of Enceladus revealed the detection of a molecule called hydrogen cyanide that’s toxic to humans but crucial to processes driving the origin of life. What’s more, the team also found evidence to support that Enceladus’ ocean has organic compounds that provide a source of chemical energy that could potentially be used as powerful fuel for any form of life. ...

    BELOW: Plumes can be seen releasing water vapor and organic compounds into space at the south pole of Saturn's moon Enceladus.


    https://us.cnn.com/2023/12/15/world/...scn/index.html
    This is nicer, even crispier ...

    A Breakthrough in Genome Editing: How NICER Outperforms CRISPR/Cas9

    The gene editing technique CRISPR/Cas9 has allowed researchers to make precise and impactful changes to an organism’s DNA to fix mutations that cause genetic disease. However, the CRISPR/Cas9 method can also result in unintended DNA mutations that may have negative effects. Recently, researchers in Japan have developed a new gene editing technique that is as effective as CRISPR/Cas9 while significantly reducing these unintended mutations.

    ... Researchers led by Osaka University develop a new gene modification technique known as NICER that significantly reduces off-target mutations in DNA. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/a-breakthro...s-crispr-cas9/
    A fiery flare-up ...

    NASA's images show solar flare that silenced radio signals on Earth


    https://us.cnn.com/videos/us/2023/12...o-ebof-vpx.cnn
    Molecular tangle tango ...

    Quantum Leap: Princeton Physicists Successfully Entangle Individual Molecules for the First Time

    For the first time, a team of Princeton physicists has been able to link together individual molecules into special states that are quantum mechanically “entangled.” In these bizarre states, the molecules remain correlated with each other—and can interact simultaneously—even if they are miles apart, or indeed, even if they occupy opposite ends of the universe. This research was published in the journal Science.

    “This is a breakthrough in the world of molecules because of the fundamental importance of quantum entanglement,” said Lawrence Cheuk, assistant professor of physics at Princeton University and the senior author of the paper. “But it is also a breakthrough for practical applications because entangled molecules can be the building blocks for many future applications.”

    These include, for example, quantum computers that can solve certain problems much faster than conventional computers, quantum simulators that can model complex materials whose behaviors are difficult to model, and quantum sensors that can measure faster than their traditional counterparts.
    https://scitechdaily.com/quantum-lea...he-first-time/
    Space Strangeness ...

    Mysterious fast radio bursts in space keep getting stranger

    Fast radio bursts, or bright, millisecond-long flashes of radio waves in space, are one of the most enduring mysteries of the cosmos — and they just became a little stranger.

    The first fast radio burst, or FRB, was discovered in 2007, and since then, hundreds of these quick, intense events have been detected coming from distant points across the universe. In a thousandth of a second, the bursts can generate as much energy as the sun creates in one year or more, according to previous research.

    But astronomers don’t understand what causes them.

    Now, scientists have noticed a never-before-seen quirky pattern in a newly spotted repeating fast radio burst called FRB 20220912A. A study published Wednesday in the Monthly Notices of the Royal Astronomical Society details the discovery, which provides valuable clues to researchers aiming to identify the phenomenon’s source while introducing new enigmas to unravel. ... a closer look at the signal revealed something new: a noticeable drop in the center frequency of the bursts, acting like a celestial slide whistle.

    The dip became even more obvious when the researchers converted the signals into sounds by using notes on a xylophone. High notes correspond to the beginning of the bursts, with low notes acting as the concluding tones. ... Astronomers suspect that some fast radio bursts may originate from magnetars, the powerfully magnetized cores of dead stars. But other research has suggested that collisions between dense neutron stars or dead stars called white dwarfs may be the cause. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/12/14/world/...scn/index.html
    Brain airports ...

    Epilepsy Surgery Reveals Brain’s Secret Highways: The Role of Neural Hubs

    A University of Iowa-led team of international neuroscientists have obtained the first direct recordings of the human brain in the minutes before and after a brain hub crucial for language meaning was surgically disconnected. The results reveal the importance of brain hubs in neural networks and the remarkable way in which the human brain attempts to compensate when a hub is lost, with immediacy not previously observed.

    ... Hubs are everywhere. The hub of a bicycle wheel, with spokes shooting out from the center, keeps the wheel from collapsing when the bicycle is ridden. Airport hubs connect cities across the world. And social hubs like coffee shops or online social networks are places people gather for interaction. The human brain has hubs, too – the intersection of many neuronal pathways that help coordinate brain activity required for complex functions like understanding and responding to speech. However, whether highly interconnected brain hubs are irreplaceable for certain brain functions has been controversial. By some accounts, the brain, as an already highly interconnected neural network, can in principle immediately compensate for the loss of a hub, in the same way that traffic can be redirected around a blocked-off city center. ... the researchers showed both the intrinsic importance of the hub as well as the remarkable and rapid ability of the brain to adapt and at least partially attempt to immediately compensate for its loss. The findings were reported recently in the journal Nature Communications.

    ... “The rapid impact on the speech and language processing regions well removed from the surgical treatment site was surprising, but what was even more surprising was how the brain was working to compensate, albeit incompletely, within this short timeframe,” says Petkov, who also holds an appointment at Newcastle University Medical School in the UK.

    https://scitechdaily.com/epilepsy-su...f-neural-hubs/
    New neuron news ...

    Decoding Neuronal Diversity: Study Illuminates Key RNA Edits in Synapse Proteins

    Neurons are talkers. They each communicate with fellow neurons, muscles, or other cells by releasing neurotransmitter chemicals at “synapse” junctions, ultimately producing functions ranging from emotions to motions. But even neurons of the exact same type can vary in their conversational style. A new open-access study published in the journal Cell Reports by neurobiologists at The Picower Institute for Learning and Memory highlights a molecular mechanism that might help account for the nuanced diversity of neural discourse. ...

    ... They found that a protein, complexin, plays a vital role in controlling neurotransmitter release. The study showed that RNA editing of complexin results in different versions of the protein, affecting how neurons communicate and grow synapses.

    https://scitechdaily.com/decoding-ne...apse-proteins/
    We are hunters ...

    DNA Tells All: The True Culprits Behind the Fall of Earth’s Largest Beasts

    For years, scientists have debated whether humans or the climate caused the population of large mammals to decline dramatically over the past several thousand years. A new study from Aarhus University confirms that climate cannot be the explanation. ... By studying the DNA of 139 living species of large mammals, the scientists have been able to show that abundances of almost all species fell dramatically about 50,000 years ago. ... https://scitechdaily.com/dna-tells-a...argest-beasts/
    Getting old has its advantages ... for evolution ...

    Why Do We Age? The Surprising Evolutionary Advantage Revealed

    Researchers used computer models to investigate the evolutionary role of aging. They challenge the notion that aging has no positive function, suggesting it might expedite evolution in changing environments, thereby benefiting subsequent generations. Their findings indicate that aging could be an advantageous trait selected by natural evolution. ...

    ... After running the model, the Hungarian biologists found that aging can indeed accelerate evolution. This is advantageous in a changing world because the faster adaptation can find the adequate traits more quickly, thereby supporting the survival and spread of descendent genes. This means that senescence can become a really advantageous characteristic and be favored by natural selection.

    https://scitechdaily.com/why-do-we-a...tage-revealed/
    That's using your heads!

    Mysterious Anatomy Unraveled – Stanford Scientists Uncover Location of Starfish’s Head

    ... a new Stanford study that used genetic and molecular tools to map out the body regions of starfish – by creating a 3D atlas of their gene expression – helps answer this longstanding mystery. The “head” of a starfish, the researchers found, is not in any one place. Instead, the headlike regions are distributed with some in the center of the sea star as well as in the center of each limb of its body. ...

    “There are 34 different animal phyla living on this planet and in over roughly 600 million years they have all come up with different solutions to the same fundamental biological problems,” Lowe said. “Most animals don’t have spectacular nervous systems and are out chasing prey – they are modest animals that live in burrows in the ocean. People are generally not drawn to these animals, and yet they probably represent how much of life got started.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/mysterious-...tarfishs-head/
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    Last edited by Jundo; 12-18-2023 at 06:43 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  32. #1032
    Stunning picture of Uranus from James Webb telescope

    https://webbtelescope.org/contents/n...Dlong%20winter.

    STScI-01HHFNPAHH8T1WG2ZNDXMEW2XS.png

    Gasshō

    stlah, Bernal

  33. #1033
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    This stone battery technology is HOT! ... worth a watch ...

    I like the idea of the rocks, so simple, yet promising. I hope they don't seek profit over availability
    Gasshō
    stlah, Bernal

  34. #1034
    Quote Originally Posted by nalber3 View Post
    I am avoiding the temptation to make a very bad joke ...

    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  35. #1035
    Who doesn't love cat videos ... but this one is special ...

    NASA laser message beams video of a cat named Taters back to Earth, and it’s a big deal

    A laser communications experiment flying aboard NASA’s Psyche mission has beamed back a video to Earth from nearly 19 million miles (31 million kilometers) away — and the short clip stars a cat named Taters. It’s the first time NASA has streamed a video from deep space using a laser.

    In the ultra-high definition video, the playful orange tabby cat chases, of all things, the elusive red dot from a laser pointer as it moves across a couch.

    The cat video was transmitted to Earth from a flight laser transceiver as part of the Deep Space Optical Communications experiment, or DSOC. The technology could one day be used to quickly transmit data, imagery and videos as humans push the limits of space exploration by venturing to places like Mars.

    The 15-second video was encoded in a near-infrared laser and beamed from the Psyche spacecraft to the Hale Telescope at the California Institute of Technology’s Palomar Observatory. The video was downloaded at the observatory on December 11, and each frame was streamed live at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

    At the time of the transmission, the distance between the Psyche spacecraft and Hale was 80 times the distance between Earth and the moon. It only took 101 seconds for the laser to each Earth.


    https://us.cnn.com/2023/12/18/world/...scn/index.html
    My reaction was ... "WOW!!!" ...

    Scientists successfully replicate historic nuclear fusion breakthrough three times


    Scientists in California shooting nearly 200 lasers at a cylinder holding a fuel capsule the size of a peppercorn have taken another step in the quest for fusion energy, which, if mastered, could provide the world with a near-limitless source of clean power.

    Last year on a December morning, scientists at the National Ignition Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in California (LLNL) managed, in a world first, to produce a nuclear fusion reaction that released more energy than it used, in a process called “ignition.”

    Now they say they have successfully replicated ignition at least three times this year, according to a December report from the LLNL. This marks another significant step in what could one day be an important solution to the global climate crisis, driven primarily by the burning of fossil fuels.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/12/20/climat...ate/index.html
    Might we all be expert neuro-surgeons someday? ...

    Zap Your Way to Surgical Mastery: Johns Hopkins’ Shocking New Training Technique

    A study by Johns Hopkins University demonstrates that applying gentle electric currents to the cerebellum enhances the ability of individuals to transfer skills from virtual reality to real-world settings, especially in robotic surgery. This technique, which showed significant improvement in participants’ dexterity and skill application without previous surgical or robotics training, could revolutionize training methods in various high-tech industries, including medicine and robotics.



    https://scitechdaily.com/zap-your-wa...ing-technique/
    Fake Jeans ...

    Revolutionizing Biology: USC’s Breakthrough in “CReATiNG” Synthetic Chromosomes


    A groundbreaking new technique invented by researchers at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Science may revolutionize the field of synthetic biology. Known as CReATiNG (Cloning Reprogramming and Assembling Tiled Natural Genomic DNA), the method offers a simpler and more cost-effective approach to constructing synthetic chromosomes. It could significantly advance genetic engineering and enable a wide range of advances in medicine, biotechnology, biofuel production, and even space exploration.

    https://scitechdaily.com/revolutioni...c-chromosomes/
    There is dark code within us all ... and it is most of us ...

    Dark Genome Discovery: Researchers Reveal “Ancient Genetic Parasite” Implicated in Human Diseases

    Research published on December 14 in Nature sheds light on a small part of the so-called “dark genome” — the 98 percent of the human genome whose biological function is largely not known.

    In this case, an international multidisciplinary team reported the first high-resolution images and structural details of a genetic element known as LINE-1, which inserts itself into the human genome and is implicated in diseases such as cancer, autoimmune disorders, neurodegeneration, and even aging.

    ... LINE-1 is described in the paper as an “ancient genetic parasite” with about 100 potentially active copies in each person. LINE-1 activity is often correlated with disease.

    Unlike DNA, which makes RNA and then proteins, retrotransposons like LINE-1 work backward, making DNA from RNA and then inserting it into the genome. [] The enzyme needed for this process is called LINE-1 reverse transcriptase, or LINE-1 RT.

    https://scitechdaily.com/dark-genome...uman-diseases/
    Maybe AI will figure the "dark genome" out ...

    Automating Scientific Discovery: Carnegie Mellon’s AI Coscientist Transforms Lab Work

    Carnegie Mellon’s AI system, Coscientist, autonomously conducts chemistry experiments, significantly advancing scientific research. By using large language models and automating the experimental process, it offers a new level of efficiency and accessibility in scientific research, with an emphasis on safety and ethical use ...

    ... For example, a scientist could ask Coscientist to find a compound with given properties. The system scours the Internet, documentation data, and other available sources, synthesizes the information, and selects a course of experimentation that uses robotic application programming interfaces (APIs). The experimental plan is then sent to and completed by automated instruments. In all, a human working with the system can design and run an experiment much more quickly, accurately, and efficiently than a human alone. ...

    How LLM learns ...

    In a Striking Discovery, AI Shows Human-Like Memory Formation

    An interdisciplinary team has found that AI models, particularly the Transformer, process memory in a manner similar to the human brain’s hippocampus. This breakthrough suggests that applying neuroscience principles, like those of the NMDA receptor, to AI can improve memory functions, advancing the field of AI and offering insights into human brain function. ... The NMDA receptor is like a smart door in your brain that facilitates learning and memory formation. When a brain chemical called glutamate is present, the nerve cell undergoes excitation. On the other hand, a magnesium ion acts as a small gatekeeper blocking the door. Only when this ionic gatekeeper steps aside, substances are allowed to flow into the cell. This is the process that allows the brain to create and keep memories, and the gatekeeper’s (the magnesium ion) role in the whole process is quite specific.

    ... The team made a fascinating discovery: the Transformer model seems to use a gatekeeping process similar to the brain’s NMDA receptor [see Figure 1]. This revelation led the researchers to investigate if the Transformer’s memory consolidation can be controlled by a mechanism similar to the NMDA receptor’s gating process.

    https://scitechdaily.com/in-a-striki...ory-formation/
    But more down to earth ... although in the sky ...

    This cargo plane flew with no pilot on board

    One of the world’s most widely used cargo planes completed an entire flight with no one on board for the first time.

    Lasting approximately 12 minutes in total, the flight departed from Hollister Airport, in Northern California, and was operated by Reliable Robotics, which has been working since 2019 on a semi-automated flying system in which the aircraft is controlled remotely by a pilot.


    https://us.cnn.com/travel/cessna-car...ntl/index.html
    But AI also overdoes ...

    Rite Aid’s ‘reckless’ use of facial recognition got it banned from using the technology in stores for five years

    Rite Aid has agreed to a five-year ban from using facial recognition technology after the Federal Trade Commission found that the chain falsely accused customers of crimes and unfairly targeted people of color.

    The FTC and Rite Aid reached a settlement Tuesday after a complaint accused the chain of using artificial intelligence-based software in hundreds of stores to identify people Rite Aid “deemed likely to engage in shoplifting or other criminal behavior” and kick them out of stores – or prevent them from coming inside.

    But the imperfect technology led employees to act on false-positive alerts, which wrongly identified customers as criminals. In some cases, the FTC accused Rite Aid employees of publicly accusing people of criminal activity in front of friends, family and strangers. Some customers were wrongly detained and subjected to searches, the FTC said.

    https://us.cnn.com/2023/12/20/tech/r...ent/index.html
    This will never be comprehensive ... but it is a start ...

    Biden administration takes first step toward writing key AI standards

    ... The agency is developing guidelines for evaluating AI, facilitating development of standards and provide testing environments for evaluating AI systems. The request seeks input from AI companies and the public on generative AI risk management and reducing risks of AI-generated misinformation. ... NIST is working on setting guidelines for testing, including where so-called "red-teaming" would be most beneficial for AI risk assessment and management and setting best practices for doing so.

    External red-teaming has been used for years in cybersecurity to identify new risks, with the term referring to U.S. Cold War simulations where the enemy was termed the "red team."

    https://www.reuters.com/technology/b...ds-2023-12-20/
    Glass that shoots heat into space ...

    A New Weapon Against Climate Change – Scientists Develop “Cooling Glass” That Blasts Building Heat Into Space

    Researchers from the University of Maryland have created an innovative “cooling glass” designed to reduce indoor temperatures without using electricity. This groundbreaking material functions by tapping into the chill of outer space.

    The new technology, a microporous glass coating described in a paper published in the journal Science, can lower the temperature of the material beneath it by 3.5 degrees Celsius at noon, and has the potential to reduce a mid-rise apartment building’s yearly carbon emissions by 10%, according to the research team led by Distinguished University Professor Liangbing Hu in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering. ... The coating works in two ways: First, it reflects up to 99% of solar radiation to stop buildings from absorbing heat. More intriguingly, it emits heat in the form of longwave infrared radiation into the icy universe, where the temperature is generally around -270 degrees Celsius, or just a few degrees above absolute zero.

    In a phenomenon known as “radiative cooling,” space effectively acts as a heat sink for the buildings; they take advantage of the new cooling glass design along with the so-called atmospheric transparency window—a part of the electromagnetic spectrum that passes through the atmosphere without boosting its temperature—to dump large amounts of heat into the infinite cold sky beyond. (The same phenomenon allows the earth to cool itself, particularly on clear nights, although with much less intense emissions than those from the new glass developed at UMD.)

    https://scitechdaily.com/a-new-weapo...at-into-space/
    A cancer cure for a buck?

    The $1 Cure: How Programmable Bacteria Are Reshaping Cancer Therapy


    What if a single one-dollar dose could cure cancer?

    A multi-university team of researchers, supported by federal funding, is developing a highly efficient bacterial therapeutic to target cancer more precisely to make treatment safer through a single $1 dose. ...

    ... Drs. Arum Han, Jim Song and Chelsea Hu are developing synthetic programmable bacteria for immune-directed killing in tumor environments (SPIKEs). The idea is to engineer bacteria to help T cells kill cancerous tissue, destroy itself once the cancer is gone, and leave the body safely as human waste. ... “SPIKEs can specifically target tumor cells,” said Han, the Texas Instruments Professor in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering. “And since it’s only targeting cancerous tissue and not the surrounding healthy cells, the safety of the patient is exponentially increased. It’s a great honor to be on this team, tackling a major health problem that affects a lot of people.”

    Han’s lab is developing high-throughput microfluidic systems that can rapidly process and screen massive bacterial therapeutic libraries, one cell at a time, to quickly identify the most promising treatments. These systems are enabled by integrating microfabrication methods and biotechnology to achieve a pico-liter-volume liquid handling system that can accurately analyze single cells with high precision and high speeds, creating devices to analyze individual cells quickly.

    “The major challenge is figuring out how to actually develop these sophisticated microdevices that allow us to conduct millions and millions of fully automated tests with almost no manual or human intervention,” Han said. “That’s the engineering challenge.”

    https://scitechdaily.com/the-1-cure-...ancer-therapy/
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  36. #1036
    Discoveries and innovations to close the year ... and tragedies too ...

    A day in the life ...

    Shadow Play: NASA’s Curiosity Mars Rover Captures a Martian Day, From Dawn to Dusk

    When NASA’s Curiosity Mars rover isn’t on the move, it works pretty well as a sundial, as seen in two black-and-white videos recorded on November 8, the 4,002nd Martian day, or sol, of the mission. The rover captured its own shadow shifting across the surface of Mars using its black-and-white Hazard-Avoidance Cameras, or Hazcams.


    https://scitechdaily.com/shadow-play...-dawn-to-dusk/
    Grains in the hour glass ...

    In a Universe of Wonders: NASA’s Hubble Presents a Holiday Globe of a Billion Stars

    Hubble’s colorful snapshots show that the universe always looks like it’s in a holiday spirit. The dwarf irregular galaxy UGC 8091 is an opulent example. The dizzying interplay of matter and energy bubbles up to create dazzling blue, newborn stars that look like a festive string of lights. They are swaddled in glowing cocoons of hot, pink hydrogen gas. The galaxy is a collection of approximately 1 billion stars. That sounds like a lot, but it is 1/100th the stellar population inside our full-grown Milky Way galaxy. ...


    https://scitechdaily.com/in-a-univer...billion-stars/
    Always something new to discover about the body, and how it seeks health ...

    “Fascinating” Findings – Scientists Have Discovered a New Type of Immune Cell

    Lo, a distinguished professor of biomedical sciences in the UC Riverside School of Medicine, and Del Castillo, who are co-authors on the research paper published in Nature, confirmed the newly discovered cells in the thymus are just like M cells. Acting like gatekeepers, M cells are specialized antigen-delivery cells for the immune system in organs like the intestine and lungs. They play a key role in the development of the body’s immune system. ... “These particular M cells are limited to a specific region in the thymus and have unique associations with different cell types and functions,” Del Castillo said. “Questions these cells have already prompted include how similar are they to M cells elsewhere in the body and what is different about where they have been found.” ... “The thymus is complicated because it creates a whole functional immune system and repertoire, and we know many component parts play a role in its performance,” he said. “We didn’t expect M cells to even show up in the thymus. This is, therefore, a satisfying discovery because it is so clearly connected to similar processes happening in the gut and airways, which is where 60-70% of our infectious agents enter our bodies.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/fascinating...f-immune-cell/
    AI gets an A+ in chemistry ...

    From Code to Chemistry: Coscientist, the AI System Mastering Nobel Prize-Winning Reactions

    In less time than it will take you to read this article, an artificial intelligence-driven system was able to autonomously learn about certain Nobel Prize-winning chemical reactions and design a successful laboratory procedure to make them. The AI did all that in just a few minutes — and nailed it on the first try.

    “This is the first time that a non-organic intelligence planned, designed, and executed this complex reaction that was invented by humans,” says Carnegie Mellon University chemist and chemical engineer Gabe Gomes, who led the research team that assembled and tested the AI-based system. They dubbed their creation “Coscientist.”

    The most complex reactions Coscientist pulled off are known in organic chemistry as palladium-catalyzed cross couplings, which earned its human inventors the 2010 Nobel Prize for chemistry in recognition of the outsize role those reactions came to play in the pharmaceutical development process and other industries that use finicky, carbon-based molecules.

    Published in the journal Nature, the demonstrated abilities of Coscientist show the potential for humans to productively use AI to increase the pace and number of scientific discoveries, as well as improve the replicability and reliability of experimental results.

    https://scitechdaily.com/from-code-t...ing-reactions/
    Where is the hype, and where is the reality about AI???

    2023: The year we played with artificial intelligence -- and weren't sure what to do about it

    ... Some of the AI field's most esteemed scientists warned that the technology's unchecked progress was marching toward outsmarting humans and possibly threatening their existence, while other scientists called their concerns overblown or brought attention to more immediate risks. ...

    ... But the latest generative AI trend is at peak hype, according to the market research firm Gartner, which has tracked what it calls the "hype cycle" of emerging technology since the 1990s. Picture a wooden rollercoaster ticking up to its highest hill, about to careen down into what Gartner describes as a "trough of disillusionment" before coasting back to reality. ...

    ... But Gruber believes what's happening now is the "biggest wave ever" in AI, unleashing new possibilities as well as dangers.

    ...

    The dangers could come fast in 2024, as major national elections in the U.S., India and elsewhere could get flooded with AI-generated deepfakes.

    In the longer term, AI technology's rapidly improving language, visual perception and step-by-step planning capabilities could supercharge the vision of a digital assistant -- but only if granted access to the "inner loop of our digital life stream," Gruber said.

    "They can manage your attention as in, 'You should watch this video. You should read this book. You should respond to this person's communication,'" Gruber said. "That is what a real executive assistant does. And we could have that, but with a really big risk of personal information and privacy."

    https://mainichi.jp/english/articles...0m/0bu/010000c
    This was the space mission run from here, by Tsukuba, Japan's JAXA ...

    Rethinking Cosmic Origins: The Ryugu Asteroid Samples’ Revelatory Findings

    A recent study on asteroid Ryugu’s samples, brought back by Hayabusa2, offers new understanding of early solar system materials, challenging previous beliefs about asteroid compositions and the impact of Earth’s atmosphere on meteorites. ... “This study opens new avenues for understanding the composition and evolution of small bodies in our solar system. By considering the impact of terrestrial weathering on meteorites, we can refine our interpretations of asteroid compositions and advance our knowledge of the solar system’s early history,” said Kana Amano, a former PhD student at the early Solar System evolution Research Group at Tohoku University and co-author of the paper. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/rethinking-...tory-findings/
    Also being run by JAXA here in Tsukuba ... Tsukuba to the moon! ...

    Japan’s lunar spacecraft arrives in orbit ahead of historic moon landing attempt

    The “Moon Sniper” lander developed by Japan’s space agency successfully entered lunar orbit on Christmas Day. The milestone brings the nation a step closer to achieving its goal of landing a robotic explorer on the moon’s surface for the first time.

    On its current path, the lander is completing one loop of the moon roughly every 6.4 hours. But over the next few weeks, the vehicle will slowly tighten its orbit, diving closer to the moon’s surface as it prepares for its historic touchdown attempt, slated for mid-January.

    If successful, Japan would become only the fifth country to accomplish such a feat and only the third country to do so in the 21st century.


    https://us.cnn.com/2023/12/26/world/...scn/index.html
    Pictures can deceive ...

    The Great Galactic Misconception: Uncovering True Distances in Space

    ... This image is a really interesting example of how challenging it can be to tell whether two galaxies are actually close together, or just seem to be from our perspective here on Earth. A quick glance at this image would likely lead you to think that NGC 1356, LEDA 467699, and LEDA 95415 were all close companions, while IC 1947 was more remote. ... For instance, while NGC 1356 and LEDA 95415 appear to be so close that they must surely be interacting, the former is about 550 million light-years from Earth and the latter is roughly 840 million light-years away, so there is nearly a whopping 300 million light-year separation between them. That also means that LEDA 95415 is likely nowhere near as much smaller than NGC 1356 as it appears to be.

    On the other hand, while NGC 1356 and IC 1947 seem to be separated by a relative gulf in this image, IC 1947 is only about 500 million light-years from Earth. The angular distance apparent between them in this image only works out to less than four hundred thousand light-years, so they are actually much much closer neighbors in three-dimensional space than NGC 1356 and LEDA 95415!


    https://scitechdaily.com/the-great-g...nces-in-space/
    X and Y ... more than just sex ...

    The Surprising Influence of Sex Chromosomes on Whole-Body Gene Expression

    Researchers David Page and Adrianna San Roman discovered that human sex chromosomes, particularly the gene pair ZFX and ZFY, regulate a wide range of genes throughout the body. Their findings, which redefine the roles of the X and Y chromosomes, suggest these chromosomes are crucial regulators of gene expression beyond just determining sex. ... by dialing up or down the expression of thousands of genes found on other chromosomes. ...

    ... Furthermore, the researchers found that the gene pair responsible for around half of this regulatory behavior, ZFX and ZFY, found on the X and Y chromosome respectively, have essentially the same regulatory effects as each other. This suggests that ZFX and ZFY inherited their role as influential gene regulators from their shared ancestor and have independently maintained it, even as their respective chromosomes diverged, because that regulatory role is critical for human growth and development.

    ... A subtlety thus far not discussed is that when Page and San Roman think about the sex chromosomes, they no longer think of X as most people think of it. Their work has convinced them that our current understanding of the sex chromosomes is imprecise. Although the human sex chromosomes are defined as X and Y, in fact there are two types of X chromosomes, and only one of them differs between typical males and females. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/the-surpris...ne-expression/
    A medical miracle in Turin ...

    Italian may regain use of hand after nerve transfer from amputated leg

    A man may regain the use of his hand, left paralysed by a severe road accident, thanks to a pioneering nerve transfer operation from his partly amputated leg, doctors in northern Italy said.

    Surgeons at Turin City Hospital (CTO) transferred part of the man's sciatic nerve, which controlled the movement of his amputated foot, to his brachial plexus, the network of nerves that connect the spinal cord to the shoulder, arm and hand.

    ... "We think this is pioneering surgery because if it works it means that the brain plasticity can control also other parts of the body that we didn't expect and also opens new fields in neuro studies," Titolo said. ...

    https://www.reuters.com/business/hea...eg-2023-12-27/
    Let there be light ...

    E=mc² Comes Alive: Simulating Matter Creation From Laser Light

    A team led by researchers at Osaka University and UC, San Diego has used simulations to demonstrate how one can experimentally produce matter solely from light, which in the future might help test long-standing theories on the composition of the universe.

    One of the most striking predictions of quantum physics is that matter can be generated solely from light (i.e., photons), and in fact, the astronomical bodies known as pulsars achieve this feat. Directly generating matter in this manner has not been achieved in a laboratory, but it would enable further testing of the theories of basic quantum physics and the fundamental composition of the universe.

    https://scitechdaily.com/emc2-comes-...m-laser-light/
    Soon, we will move things with our thoughts ...

    Mind Control Breakthrough: Caltech’s Pioneering Ultrasound Brain–Machine Interface

    The latest advancements in Brain-Machine Interfaces [BMIs] feature functional ultrasound (fUS), a non-invasive technique for reading brain activity. This innovation has shown promising results in controlling devices with minimal delay and without the need for frequent recalibration. ... Many BMIs require invasive surgeries to implant electrodes into the brain in order to read neural activity. However, in 2021, Caltech researchers developed a way to read brain activity using functional ultrasound (fUS), a much less invasive technique. ...

    ... Because the skull itself is not permeable to sound waves, using ultrasound for brain imaging requires a transparent “window” to be installed into the skull. “Importantly, ultrasound technology does not need to be implanted into the brain itself,” says Whitney Griggs (PhD ’23), a co-first author on the study. “This significantly reduces the chance for infection and leaves the brain tissue and its protective dura perfectly intact.”

    “As neurons’ activity changes, so does their use of metabolic resources like oxygen,” says Norman. “Those resources are resupplied through the blood stream, which is the key to functional ultrasound.” In this study, the researchers used ultrasound to measure changes in blood flow to specific brain regions. In the same way that the sound of an ambulance siren changes in pitch as it moves closer and then farther away from you, red blood cells will increase the pitch of the reflected ultrasound waves as they approach the source and decrease the pitch as they flow away. Measuring this Doppler-effect phenomenon allowed the researchers to record tiny changes in the brain’s blood flow down to spatial regions just 100 micrometers wide, about the width of a human hair. This enabled them to simultaneously measure the activity of tiny neural populations, some as small as just 60 neurons, widely throughout the brain. ... The ultrasound data was sent in real-time to a decoder (previously trained to decode the meaning of that data using machine learning), and subsequently generated control signals to move a cursor to where the animal intended it to go. The BMI was able to successfully do this to eight radial targets with mean errors of less than 40 degrees. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/mind-contro...ine-interface/
    What separates the men from the monkeys ...

    Brain Evolution Unlocked: Over 100 Genes That Make Us Uniquely Human

    An international team led by researchers at the University of Toronto has uncovered over 100 genes that are common to primate brains but have undergone evolutionary divergence only in humans – and which could be a source of our unique cognitive ability. ... The divergent genes the researchers identified are found in 57 brain cell types, grouped by inhibitory neurons, excitatory neurons, and non-neurons. A quarter of the genes were only expressed differently in neuronal cells, also known as grey matter, and half were only expressed differently in glial cells, which are white matter. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/brain-evolu...niquely-human/
    And for all this, people remain the weak link, not the technology itself ...

    ... as modern day slavery, scams and tech intersect ...

    ... appears to be a modern apartment complex, but the 10-foot-high fence and guard tower suggest otherwise

    ... It’s known as a “pig butchering” scam -- a type of confidence fraud in which victims are lured by scammers often impersonating young women on the internet. The scammers then spend weeks building a relationship with their victim, introducing them to cryptocurrency and encouraging them to invest on a fake platform.

    Victims are shown startling returns and coaxed to keep pumping in more money — like a pig slowly fattened for the slaughter — until one day their scammer disappears along with the money. ... In 2020 reported losses connected to pig butchering scams amounted to $907million, according to the FBI. By November 2023 that number had shot up to $2.9 billion for the year.

    ... It is in one of these compounds that Indian national Rakesh, 33, worked for 11 months as a scammer stealing thousands of dollars from unsuspecting victims like CY.

    From San Francisco, someone like Rakesh may look like the bad guy. But he was also the victim of a brutal scam. Lured to Thailand with promises of white-collar jobs, thousands of people from across the world are trafficked to criminal hubs in Myanmar where they are held against their will and forced to steal millions in cryptocurrency.

    The UN estimates that up to 120,000 people could be held in compounds across Myanmar, with another 100,000 people held in Cambodia and elsewhere in conditions that amount to modern slavery. ...

    ... A few days after his release from Gate 25 Rakesh sits on the edge of his bed in a dark hotel room showing photos of his friends still stuck inside.

    “These bastards don't care about and don't have any feelings for other persons,” he says.

    Rakesh is out, but hundreds of thousands of people remain trapped in scam compounds across Asia, and more are popping up all around the globe. ...

    https://edition.cnn.com/interactive/...-intl-hnk-dst/
    Happy New (Earth) Year Everyone!

    Gassho, J

    stlah
    Last edited by Jundo; 12-31-2023 at 05:28 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  37. #1037
    A good week for NASA in some ways ...

    Cosmic Cinema: NASA Unveils Stunning 14-Year Time-Lapse of the Gamma-Ray Sky

    NASA’s Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope has created a stunning all-sky time-lapse movie from 14 years of data, capturing the dynamic universe. It highlights the Sun’s path, the gamma-ray glow of the Milky Way, and distant galaxies known as blazars. The movie reveals both the beauty and complexity of the cosmos, showcasing high-energy events from across the galaxy and beyond, including eruptions from supermassive black holes.



    https://scitechdaily.com/cosmic-cine...gamma-ray-sky/
    Not a good week for our return to the moon ... but what's the rush? ...

    NASA delays astronaut moon landing to at least 2026

    The primary reasons for the delay include SpaceX’s outlook for developing Starship, the gargantuan rocket and spacecraft system that is expected to ferry astronauts from lunar orbit to the moon’s south pole. Two Starship test flights in 2023 ended in explosions. ... NASA officials added that they are also expecting delays in engineering the spacesuits astronauts will wear while on the moon’s surface. ... That delay is [also] linked in part to issues with the Orion crew capsule that will be home to the astronauts during the mission. The space agency previously disclosed that the spacecraft’s heat shield, which keeps Orion from burning up as the vehicle reenters the Earth’s atmosphere, became charred and eroded in an unexpected way during the uncrewed Artemis I mission in 2022...

    https://us.cnn.com/2024/01/09/world/...scn/index.html

    Peregrine mission abandons moon landing attempt after suffering ‘critical’ fuel loss

    Astrobotic Technology, the company that developed the first lunar lander to launch from the United States in five decades, said it is abandoning an attempt to put its Peregrine spacecraft on the moon less than 24 hours after the vehicle took flight. The spacecraft has suffered “critical” propellant loss from a fuel leak, according to the company. ... On board the Peregrine vehicle are five scientific instruments from NASA and 15 other payloads from a variety of organizations and countries. The commercial payloads on the lander include mementos and even human remains that customers had paid to send to the lunar surface. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2024/01/08/world/...scn/index.html
    But some folks did not like it anyway ...

    Navajo Nation’s objection to landing human remains on the moon prompts last-minute White House meeting

    https://edition.cnn.com/2024/01/05/w...scn/index.html
    A bad week for AI use in chemistry too ...

    Decoding the Black Box of AI – Scientists Uncover Unexpected Results

    ...Surprisingly, their findings indicate that these AI models primarily rely on recalling existing data rather than learning specific chemical interactions for predicting the effectiveness of drugs. ... According to the scientists, this is largely reminiscent of the “Clever Hans effect”. This effect refers to a horse that could apparently count. How often Hans tapped his hoof was supposed to indicate the result of a calculation. As it turned out later, however, the horse was not able to calculate at all, but deduced expected results from nuances in the facial expressions and gestures of his companion.

    What do these findings mean for drug discovery research? “It is generally not tenable that GNNs learn chemical interactions between active substances and proteins,” says the cheminformatics scientist. Their predictions are largely overrated because forecasts of equivalent quality can be made using chemical knowledge and simpler methods. However, the research also offers opportunities for AI. Two of the GNN-examined models displayed a clear tendency to learn more interactions when the potency of test compounds increased. “It’s worth taking a closer look here,” says Bajorath. Perhaps these GNNs could be further improved in the desired direction through modified representations and training techniques. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/decoding-th...ected-results/
    Plus AI is rAIcist ... and seen as more human than human ...

    The Deceptive Realism of AI: White Faces That Fool the Eye

    ... Researchers found that AI-generated white faces are perceived as more realistic than human faces, a trend not seen with faces of people of color. ... For the AI faces, participants judged them to be real two-thirds of the time – more often than for the real faces. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/the-decepti...-fool-the-eye/
    And maybe some AI progress ... magnetically attractive ...

    Revolutionizing AI: Chiral Magnets Pave the Way for Energy-Efficient Brain-Like Computing

    Researchers have advanced brain-inspired computing using chiral magnets, significantly reducing energy use in machine-learning tasks. The research marks progress towards more sustainable and adaptable computing technologies. ... In the new study, published in the journal Nature Materials, an international team of researchers used chiral (twisted) magnets as their computational medium and found that, by applying an external magnetic field and changing temperature, the physical properties of these materials could be adapted to suit different machine-learning tasks. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/revolutioni...ike-computing/
    A very very strange case ...

    Missing exchange student found cold and scared after what police call a ‘cyber-kidnapping’


    Utah police say they found a teenage Chinese exchange student alone and cold in a tent after he was a victim of what they’re calling a “cyber-kidnapping.”

    The Riverdale Police Department said Kai Zhuang, 17, was reported missing Thursday by his high school. His parents in China had contacted the school after they received a ransom photo of their son – and had sent $80,000 to bank accounts in China “due to continuous threats from the kidnappers,” according to a press release issued Sunday.

    Police found him Sunday “alive but very cold and scared” at a makeshift campsite in the mountains near Brigham City, using Zhuang’s bank and phone records, the release said. Police said he was there on directions from his cyber-kidnappers to isolate himself. ... Police said the FBI told them other foreign exchange students, particularly Chinese, have been targeted in similar “cyber-kidnapping” scams in the US. Perpetrators threaten students, order them to isolate, monitor them through video calls and demand ransom from their families. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/us/missing-exchan...und/index.html
    Pleasure and reward ... imagine if we could rewire the pleasure and reward centers of the brain ...

    lluminating the Brain’s Reward Pathway – New Findings From Neuroscience

    Recent research uncovers how dopamine in the brain guides animals to identify and refine behaviors leading to rewards. This study, linking specific actions to dopamine release, has implications for improving learning processes in education and AI. ... It reveals how dopamine not only signals a reward but also guides animals to home in on the specific behaviors that lead to these rewards through trial and error. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/illuminatin...-neuroscience/
    When does consciousness begin?

    Scientists Shed New Light on Mystery of Infant Consciousness

    An international research study reveals that infants might possess conscious experiences from birth, integrating sensory and cognitive responses to understand their environment. ... the researchers argue that by birth the infant’s developing brain is capable of conscious experiences that can make a lasting imprint on their developing sense of self and understanding of their environment. ...

    ... “Nearly everyone who has held a newborn infant has wondered what, if anything, it is like to be a baby. But of course, we cannot remember our infancy, and consciousness researchers have disagreed on whether consciousness arises ‘early’ (at birth or shortly after) or ‘late’ *– by one year of age, or even much later.” ... To provide a new perspective on when consciousness first emerges, the team built upon recent advances in consciousness science. In adults, some markers from brain imaging have been found to reliably differentiate consciousness from its absence, and are increasingly applied in science and medicine. This is the first time that a review of these markers in infants has been used to assess their consciousness. ... “Our findings suggest that newborns can integrate sensory and developing cognitive responses into coherent conscious experiences to understand the actions of others and plan their own responses.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/scientists-...consciousness/
    Neurons and neurons ...

    First Complete Cellular Map of a Mammalian Brain Reveals Over 5,300 Cell Types

    Six years and 32 million cells later, scientists have created the first full cellular map of a mammalian brain. In a set of 10 papers in Nature today, a network of researchers unveiled an atlas cataloging the location and type of every cell in the adult mouse brain. Using advanced technologies that profile individual cells, the teams identified over 5,300 cell types – far more than known before – and pinpointed their locations within the brain’s intricate geography. ... “This is a landmark achievement that really opens the door for the next stage of investigations of the brain’s function, development and evolution, akin to the reference genomes for studying gene function and genomic evolution,” said Zeng, who led one of the studies. “My colleagues said that the 5,000 cell types we identified will keep neuroscientists busy for the next 20 years trying to figure out what these cell types do and how they change in disease.” ... One of the atlas’s major revelations is the deep connection between a cell’s genetic identity and its spatial position, Zeng said. This relationship underscores how location shapes function, offering clues into the evolutionary history and intricate interactions of different brain regions. ...

    BELOW: Detailed classification and distribution of cell types in the entire mouse brain based on the expression of their genes.


    https://scitechdaily.com/first-compl...00-cell-types/
    And how are they strung together ? ....

    Scientists Have Decoded the Mechanism of How Synapses Are Formed

    Researchers have made significant advances in understanding synapse formation. They used CRISPR technology to observe synaptic vesicle development and discovered that synaptic components share a common transport pathway. This finding, coupled with the discovery of unique neuronal transport organelles, offers new insights into neuronal functions and potential therapeutic approaches for neurological damage. ... To follow the formation of pre-synapses from the beginning, the researchers used CRISPR gene scissors to insert a fluorescent protein into human stem cells, and generated neurons from the modified stem cells. Thanks to the fluorescent marker, the researchers were now able to observe the development of nascent synaptic vesicles in living developing human nerve cells directly under the microscope. ...

    BELOW: Schematic representation of axonal transport vesicles (blue) carrying presynaptic proteins (SV and AZ proteins). Kinesin motor proteins (KIF1A) attach these vesicles and carry them along the axons to the site of synapse formation.


    https://scitechdaily.com/scientists-...es-are-formed/
    Nitogen is nice ... for our life ...

    Space Rocks to Life Blocks: Meteorites Likely Source of Nitrogen for Early Earth

    Micrometeorites originating from icy celestial bodies in the outer Solar System may be responsible for transporting nitrogen to the near-Earth region in the early days of our solar system. That discovery was published recently in Nature Astronomy by an international team of researchers, including University of Hawai’i at Manoa scientists, led by Kyoto University.

    Nitrogen compounds, such as ammonium salts, are abundant in material born in regions far from the sun, but evidence of their transport to Earth’s orbital region had been poorly understood.

    Nitrogen Compounds As Building Blocks for Life
    “Our recent findings suggest the possibility that a greater amount of nitrogen compounds than previously recognized was transported near Earth, potentially serving as building blocks for life on our planet,” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/space-rocks...r-early-earth/
    They once were alive ...

    Newly discovered large predator worms ruled the seas as Earth’s earliest carnivores, study finds

    Long before the first sharks appeared, large predator worms were the “terror beasts” of the seas more than 500 million years ago, according to new research.

    Scientists discovered fossils of the previously unknown worm species during expeditions in North Greenland, uncovering what they believe to be some of the earliest carnivorous animals.

    The worms reached nearly 1 foot (30 centimeters) in length and were some of the largest swimming animals at the time, known as the early Cambrian Period. ...



    https://us.cnn.com/2024/01/04/world/...scn/index.html
    I knew he was not dead ...

    AI Elvis to make virtual reality comeback in London show

    Elvis Presley fans who missed out on seeing their hero when he was alive will be able to catch a glimpse of the King of Rock 'n' Roll perform later this year, thanks to virtual reality.

    Elvis Evolution will use AI and holographic projection, augmented reality and live theatre to recreate events in Presley's life and music, said Layered Reality, the immersive entertainment company developing the show. ...
    https://www.reuters.com/lifestyle/ai...ow-2024-01-04/
    TO BE CONTINUED ...
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  38. #1038
    Say what you are thinking ...

    Not Science Fiction: Brain Implant May Enable Communication From Thoughts Alone

    A team from Duke University has created a speech prosthetic that translates brain signals into speech, aiding individuals with neurological disorders. While still slower than natural speech, the technology, backed by advanced brain sensors and ongoing research, shows promising potential for enhanced communication abilities. ...

    BELOW: A device no bigger than a postage stamp (dotted portion within white band) packs 128 microscopic sensors that can translate brain cell activity into what someone intends to say. ... Neurons just a grain of sand apart can have wildly different activity patterns when coordinating speech, so it’s necessary to distinguish signals from neighboring brain cells to help make accurate predictions about intended speech. ...


    https://scitechdaily.com/not-science...houghts-alone/
    AI will know what we are thinking, more than we know ...

    The Dark Side of AI: How Our Subconscious Is at Risk

    New research examines the potential misuse of AI in accessing our subconscious, as revealed by the Cambridge Analytica scandal. ... According to estimates, only 5% of human brain activity is conscious. The remaining 95% takes place subconsciously and not only do we have no real control over it, but we are also not even aware that it is taking place. As noted by Beltran de Heredia in his article, we are unaware of this extraordinary torrent of neural activity due to the high complexity of the interaction between our conscious mind and our subconscious behavior and our complete lack of control over the forces that guide our lives.

    However, this does not mean that people cannot be influenced subconsciously. “There are two ways for artificial intelligence to do this,” he explained. “The first one is by collecting data about people’s lives and creating a decision architecture that leads you to make a particular decision. And the other – which is currently less developed – involves using applications or devices to directly create impulses that are irresistible for our subconscious mind in order to generate impulsive responses at a subliminal level, i.e. to create impulses.”

    “As we gradually develop better and more powerful machines and become more closely connected to them, both options will become increasingly widespread. Algorithms will have more information about our lives, and creating tools to generate these impulsive responses will be easier […]

    ... “Under the proposal, the AI ban will apply when there is serious harm and the person ends up doing something they wouldn’t otherwise have done. But that’s an unrealistic standard. If I can’t access my subconscious, I can’t possibly prove what I would’ve done without the stimulus, and I can’t prove the harm either […] If subliminal advertising is now completely banned without qualification, why are we leaving room for subliminal conditioning by artificial intelligence?” ...



    https://scitechdaily.com/the-dark-si...us-is-at-risk/
    But AI helps folks too ...

    Machine Learning Predicts Sight Loss: A Breakthrough in Eye Health

    A breakthrough study by Tokyo Medical and Dental University has introduced a machine-learning model capable of predicting long-term visual impairment in patients with high myopia. Using a dataset of 34 variables from eye exams and a patient-friendly nomogram for easy interpretation, this model represents a significant step in combating the global challenge of vision loss.

    https://scitechdaily.com/machine-lea...in-eye-health/
    CRISPR over does it ...

    CRISPR’s Unintended Cuts: Alarming Findings in Cancer Gene Therapy

    Scientists have discovered that CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing can cause leukemia-derived cancer cells to eliminate important genes under stress. This overlooked phenomenon affects gene regulation and has significant implications for cancer treatment and research, highlighting the need for careful use of gene editing technologies.

    https://scitechdaily.com/crisprs-uni...-gene-therapy/
    Gassho, J
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  39. #1039
    Member Myojin's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2023
    Location
    Sakura-shi, Chiba Prefecture, Japan
    “The Dark Side of AI: How Our Subconscious Is at Risk”

    Reminds me of the plot of Minority Report.

    The idea of a computer knowing more about what goes on inside my head than I do is pretty scary, almost as scary as the snippets that I get to see most nights.

    Sattlah

    Myojin

  40. #1040
    A HUGE mystery ... imagine the hand that this ring fits ...

    Ultra-Large Structure Discovered in Distant Space Defies Our Current Understanding of the Universe

    The discovery of the Big Ring, a colossal structure 9.2 billion light-years away with a diameter of 1.3 billion light-years challenges existing cosmological theories. Along with the previously discovered Giant Arc, these structures, located in the same cosmic neighborhood, contest the Cosmological Principle. ... “We could expect maybe one exceedingly large structure in all our observable universe. Yet, the Big Ring and the Giant Arc are two huge structures and are even cosmological neighbours, which is extraordinarily fascinating.” ... Alexia said: “The Cosmological Principle assumes that the part of the universe we can see is viewed as a ‘fair sample’ of what we expect the rest of the universe to be like. We expect matter to be evenly distributed everywhere in space when we view the universe on a large scale, so there should be no noticeable irregularities above a certain size. ... "

    https://scitechdaily.com/ultra-large...-the-universe/
    Our brains rethink the brain ...

    Redefining Brain Function: Physicists Overturn Long-Standing Assumptions

    Recent research suggests that a number of neuronal characteristics, traditionally believed to stem from the cell body or soma, may actually originate from processes in the dendrites. This discovery has significant implications for the study of degenerative diseases and for understanding the different states of brain activity during sleep and wakefulness. ... For the last 75 years, a core hypothesis of neuroscience has been that the basic computational element of the brain is the neuronal soma, where the long and ramified dendritic trees are only cables that enable them to collect incoming signals from its thousands of connecting neurons. This long-lasting hypothesis has now been called into question. ... "Results showed that neuronal features are independent of these physiological conditions, a finding which strongly pinpoints dendrites as the segments which control neuronal plasticity features, such as the neuronal firing frequency and the stimulation threshold of the neuron.” ...

    This film explains ...


    https://scitechdaily.com/redefining-...g-assumptions/
    Transparent implants = Transpara-plants ...

    Revolutionary Transparent Implant Unveils Deep Brain Secrets From the Surface

    Researchers have developed a revolutionary neural implant, combining the advantages of surface and deep probing technologies. This transparent, flexible implant with high-density graphene electrodes offers high-resolution data on both surface and deep neural activities. ... The technology, tested in transgenic mice, brings the researchers a step closer to building a minimally invasive brain-computer interface (BCI) that provides high-resolution data about deep neural activity by using recordings from the brain surface. ... Existing surface arrays, for example, are minimally invasive, but they lack the ability to capture information beyond the brain’s outer layers. In contrast, electrode arrays with thin needles that penetrate the brain are capable of probing deeper layers, but they often lead to inflammation and scarring, compromising signal quality over time.

    The new neural implant developed at UC San Diego offers the best of both worlds. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/revolutiona...m-the-surface/
    And this is mesmerizing ... maybe ...

    Unlocking Hypnosis: Stanford Enhances Brain Power With Neurostimulation

    Stanford Medicine scientists used transcranial magnetic stimulation to temporarily enhance hypnotizability in patients with chronic pain, making them better candidates for hypnotherapy. ...

    ... Approximately two-thirds of adults are at least somewhat hypnotizable, and 15% are considered highly hypnotizable, meaning they score 9 or 10 on a standard 10-point measure of hypnotizability. ... The researchers found that participants who received the neurostimulation showed a statistically significant increase in hypnotizability, scoring roughly one point higher. The sham group experienced no effect. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/unlocking-h...rostimulation/
    A material improvement ...

    Google Scientists Discovered 380,000 New Materials Using Artificial Intelligence

    The Materials Project, an open-access database for new materials, is revolutionizing how researchers discover and develop materials for future technologies, with Google DeepMind contributing 400,000 new compounds. This synergy of AI, supercomputing, and experimental data speeds up the creation of materials for applications like renewable energy, efficient electronics, and environmental solutions.

    https://scitechdaily.com/google-scie...-intelligence/
    Am I (and you too) from Amyloid?

    The Amyloid Hypothesis: Rewriting Life’s Origin Story

    New research explores how amyloids, capable of forming under early Earth conditions and binding with RNA and DNA, may have played a key role in life’s emergence by increasing molecular stability and encouraging cooperation over competition. ... Riek and his team have been pursuing the idea that protein-​like aggregates, known as amyloids, might have played an important role in the transition between chemistry and biology. Riek’s research group’s first step was to demonstrate that such amyloids can be formed relatively easily under the conditions that probably prevailed on the early Earth: in the laboratory, all it takes is a little volcanic gas (as well as experimental skill and a lot of patience) for simple amino acids to combine into short peptide chains, which then spontaneously assemble into fibers.

    Later, Riek’s team demonstrated that amyloids can replicate themselves – which means that the molecules fulfill another decisive criterion for being considered precursor molecules of life. And now the researchers have taken the same line for a third time with their latest study, in which they show that amyloids are able to bind with molecules of both RNA and DNA. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/the-amyloid...-origin-story/
    An old gene, once useful, is the source of modern problems ...

    Gene that protected humans 5,000 years ago may be linked to debilitating modern disease

    Scientists have compiled the largest database of ancient DNA based on the bones and teeth of almost 5,000 humans who lived across Western Europe and parts of Central Asia from 34,000 years ago until medieval times.

    Analysis of this uniquely detailed pool of ancient genetic information suggests genes that may have once protected prehistoric hunter-gatherers or Bronze Age herders from harmful pathogens may today increase the risk of neurodegenerative diseases such as multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer’s in Europeans. ...

    ... Researchers used the database to explore the genetic origins of multiple sclerosis. They found that genetic risk of having the condition correlates to the proportion of ancestry from a group of ancient pastoralists who introduced domesticated animals to Europe around 5,000 years ago.

    These nomadic herders of cattle and sheep, known as the Yamnaya, originated from the Pontic steppe, which stretches from southeastern Europe into Kazakhstan. It’s thought they were the first horse riders, making them highly mobile.

    When they moved westward into Europe, they brought specific genetic variants that the researchers believe evolved to protect the nomads against pathogens carried by domesticated animals, the study found.

    These genetic variants may have subsequently proved beneficial to European populations in making the shift from hunting and gathering to farming.

    And because the Yamnaya primarily moved into northern Europe, the team concluded that the increased proportion of pastoralist ancestry in present-day northern Europeans might be partly responsible for the higher prevalence of the disease there. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2024/01/11/health...scn/index.html
    Really, Sherlock?

    Are fingerprints unique? Not really, AI-based study finds

    ... However, Guo said he’s confident that the discovery can improve criminal investigations.:

    “The most immediate application is it can help generate new leads for cold cases, where the fingerprints left at the crime scene are from different fingers than those on file,” he said. “But on the flip side, this won’t just help catch more criminals. This will also actually help innocent people who might not have to be unnecessarily investigated anymore. And I think that’s a win for society.” ...


    ... Simon Cole, a professor in the department of criminology, law and society at the University of California, Irvine, agreed that the paper is interesting but said its practical utility is overstated. Cole was also not involved in the study.

    “We were not ‘wrong’ about fingerprints,” he said of forensic experts. “The unproven but intuitively true claim that no two fingerprints are ‘exactly alike’ is not rebutted by finding that fingerprints are similar. Fingerprints from different people, as well as from the same person have always been known to be similar.”

    The paper said the system could be useful in crime scenes in which the fingerprints found are from different fingers than those in the police record, but Cole said that this can only occur in rare cases, because when prints are taken, all 10 fingers and often palms are routinely recorded. “It’s not clear to me when they think law enforcement will have only some, but not all, of an individual’s fingerprints on record,” he said. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2024/01/12/world/...scn/index.html
    AInemployment ...

    ‘Jobs may disappear’: Nearly 40% of global employment could be disrupted by AI, IMF says

    Almost 40% of jobs around the world could be affected by the rise of artificial intelligence (AI), a trend that is likely to deepen inequality, according to the International Monetary Fund.

    In a Sunday blog post, IMF chief Kristalina Georgieva called for governments to establish social safety nets and offer retraining programs to counter the impact of AI.

    “In most scenarios, AI will likely worsen overall inequality, a troubling trend that policymakers must proactively address to prevent the technology from further stoking social tensions,” she wrote ahead of the annual meeting of the World Economic Forum (WEF) in Davos, Switzerland, where the topic is set to be high on the agenda. ...

    ... Georgieva said the effects were expected to be felt more deeply in advanced economies than emerging markets, partly because white-collar workers are seen to be more at risk than manual laborers. In more developed economies, for example, as much as 60% of jobs could be impacted by AI. Approximately half of those may benefit from how AI promotes higher productivity, she said. ... She warned that the use of AI could increase chances of social unrest, particularly if younger, less experienced workers seized on the technology as a way to help boost their output while more senior workers struggle to keep up. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2024/01/15/tech/i...hnk/index.html
    Consumers of tomorrow ... and the FIRST STEP TO OUR TREELEAF HOLO-ZENDO!!!

    Consumer Electronics Show (CES) ... Exoskeletons and AI cocktails: A walk through this year’s CES

    Several products unveiled on the CES floor catered to solving issues in health care and sustainability. Nuvilab’s AI nutrition scanner is a device that aims to do both. The scanner, which looks like a small tablet screen and a camera, uses AI image processing to assess the amount of food being consumed and wasted in restaurants and commercial kitchens. It can also show the nutritional content of a plate, like calorie intake.

    While the product is intended for any commercial kitchen to curb food waste, the nutritional content scan is meant to be helpful for places with a focus on serving healthy meals like long-term care facilities, schools and hospitals.

    Technology for physical therapy and fitness also debuted at CES. WIRobotics and Innophys showed off their wearable robotic suits. WIRobotics demonstrated a robot that straps around a user’s waist and legs to assist in walking, running or exercising for those who find it increasingly difficult. Innophys’ “wearable exoskeleton” muscle suit attaches to a user’s back to alleviate stress from labor-intensive activity. ...

    ... PalmPlug is another piece of technology looking to change the future of physical therapy, but especially curated for stroke victims. Its sensor technology is built into a small glove that wraps around the wrist and fingers. A screen detects the hand and prompts movements through games and piano lessons, making physical therapy more entertaining. “You can apply this technology in gaming and in health, sports, AR and VR, just so much, but we’re starting with health care,” ...

    ... . The Holobox by Holoconnects is a device tall and wide enough to project a full-body 3D holographic image of an individual from anywhere in the world. While everyday consumers might not have a use for it, companies can use it for keynotes and conferences. The United Nations has even used the box to bring colleagues to the U.N. floor for meetings, Holoconnects staff members said. ...

    https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/tech-ne...ces-rcna133756
    And SPECIAL MENTION, CHECK THESE OUT ...

    Award-winning close-up photos show the hidden wonders of nature

    https://us.cnn.com/travel/close-up-p...ntl/index.html
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  41. #1041
    The Holobox by Holoconnects ... first step to the Treeleaf Holo-Zendo ...



    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  42. #1042
    Sorry, my town of Tsukuba goes to the moon ...

    Live Coverage in English [Click on Youtube below] of Tsukuba (Japan) JAXA to the moon ... landing planned for 12:20 AM ...

    Japan gave the green light for its spacecraft to make a "precision" landing on the moon on Friday, its bid to become the world's fifth country to achieve a moonshot and revitalise a space programme that has suffered a wave of recent setbacks.

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) said the Smart Lander for Investigating Moon (SLIM) was en route to 15 km (9 miles) above the moon's surface, where it will start an autonomous 20-minute descent from midnight on Saturday (1500 GMT Friday).

    Dubbed the "moon sniper", SLIM is attempting to land within 100 metres (328 feet) of its target, versus the conventional accuracy of several kilometres.

    JAXA says this landing technology will become a powerful tool in future exploration of hilly moon poles seen as a potential source of oxygen, fuel and water - factors necessary to sustain life.

    JAXA will broadcast the touchdown on its YouTube channel, but has said it will take up to a month to verify whether SLIM had achieved the high-precision goals.



    Gassho, Jundo

    stlah
    Last edited by Jundo; 01-19-2024 at 02:27 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  43. #1043

    The Zen of Technology & Scientific Discovery! (& Robots)

    There is a fairly new technology for pain relief Radio Frequency Ablation. And I had recently been treated for Ankylosing Spondylitis in the upper spine and I believe it is working 100% in my case. I am so grateful 🥲 to have been fortunate enough to have my doctor be so skilled as to have reliable medical care and I am grateful beyond words. The treatment works in combination with Lidocaine Patches 12 hours on 12 off and a Simponi subQ injection which lasts 25 days so it gives 25 regular and also Lidocaine. And RFA , I am very grateful to report that I am experiencing 100% pain reliever for symptoms of pain from Ankylosing Spondylitis which has never been away from me for 10 years and more.
    Gassho
    sat lah
    Tai Shi


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
    Last edited by Tai Shi; 01-20-2024 at 02:21 PM.
    Peaceful Poet, Tai Shi. Ubasoku; calm, supportive, limited to positive 優婆塞 台 婆

  44. #1044
    The early bird catches the worm ...

    New Findings From the James Webb Telescope Suggests That Life Could Have Existed Much Earlier Than Previously Thought

    New findings from the James Webb Space Telescope reveal a surprising abundance of oxygen in the early Universe. Researchers discovered that oxygen levels in galaxies surged within 500-700 million years following the Universe’s birth, reaching levels comparable to those in contemporary galaxies. This suggests that the essential elements for life were present much earlier than previously believed. ... This opens the possibility that with the necessary ingredients, like oxygen, already readily available in the early Universe, life may have appeared sooner than previously thought. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/new-finding...ously-thought/
    Plentiful water on Mars ... huge amounts, in fact ...

    Mars Express Reveals Hidden Ice Reserves at Mars’s Equator

    Recent Mars Express data reveals the Medusae Fossae Formation contains extensive water ice layers, offering new clues about Mars’s past and supporting future exploration. ... If melted, the ice locked up in the MFF would cover the entire planet in a layer of water 1.5 to 2.7 m deep: the most water ever found in this part of Mars, and enough to fill Earth’s Red Sea. ...

    ... The extent and location of these icy MFF deposits would also make them potentially very valuable for our future exploration of Mars. Missions to Mars will need to land near the planet’s equator, far from the ice-rich polar caps or high-latitude glaciers. And they’ll need water as a resource – so finding ice in this region is almost a necessity for human missions to the planet. ... “Unfortunately, these MFF deposits are covered by hundreds of meters of dust, making them inaccessible for at least the next few decades. However, every bit of ice we find helps us build a better picture of where Mars’s water has flowed before, and where it can be found today.” ...


    https://scitechdaily.com/mars-expres...marss-equator/
    Too young to be with the grown ups ...

    Puzzling Baby Stars at the Galaxy’s Core: Astronomers Unravel Age Mystery

    Through the study of detailed data obtained from a powerful ten-meter telescope located in Hawaii, a team of scientists at Lund University in Sweden have made significant discoveries regarding three stars situated in the central region of the Milky Way galaxy. These stars were found to be unusually young with a puzzling chemical composition that surprised the researchers. ... “We can now confirm this. In our study, we have been able to date three of these stars as relatively young, at least as far as astronomers are concerned, with ages of 100 million to about 1 billion years. This can be compared with the sun, which is 4.6 billion years old,” says Rebecca Forsberg, a researcher in astronomy at Lund University. ...

    BELOW: The image, taken with ESO’s Very Large Telescope in Chile, shows a high-resolution view of the innermost parts of the Milky Way. In the new study, the researchers examined the dense nuclear star cluster shown in detail here.

    And life finds a way in even the hard places ...

    Salty Survival: Stanford Finds Life Thriving in “Uninhabitable” Conditions

    A Stanford study on microbes in extremely salty water suggests life may survive conditions previously thought to be uninhabitable. The research widens the possibilities for where life may be found throughout our solar system and shows how changes in salinity may affect life in aquatic habitats on Earth.

    https://scitechdaily.com/salty-survi...le-conditions/
    A synthetic chromosome ... YEA! yeast! ...

    Synthetic Yeast Genome Nears Completion With New Milestone

    A team of scientists from the United Kingdom, including leading experts from the University of Nottingham and Imperial College London, have successfully constructed a synthetic chromosome. This achievement is a significant milestone in a major international initiative aimed at creating the world’s first synthetic yeast genome. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/the-future-...new-milestone/
    Malaria fights back ... but, hopefully, the doctors will stay one step ahead ...

    Invisible Menace: Newly Discovered Malaria Parasites Evade Detection and Treatment

    Scientists discovered new variants of malaria parasites in Ethiopia that are resistant to existing treatments and undetectable by standard diagnostic tests. This situation could lead to a rise in malaria cases and fatalities, complicating efforts to eradicate the disease. ... “Now we’re essentially seeing the worst-case scenario: parasites with the mutation that make them resistant to treatment have also picked up the chromosomal deletions that make them invisible to the diagnostic tests,” Bailey said. “This means that it will be harder to detect people who are infected, and then when infected people are treated with antimalarial drugs, that may not work to stop them from spreading the disease.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/invisible-m...and-treatment/
    Here's how the scientists want to stay ahead ...

    Superbug crisis threatens to kill 10 million per year by 2050. Scientists may have a solution

    ... “These multi-drug-resistant superbugs can cause chronic infections in individuals for months to years to sometimes decades. It’s ridiculous just how virulent some of these bacteria get over time,” said Dwayne Roach, assistant professor of bacteriophages, infectious disease and immunology at San Diego State University. ... “It’s estimated that by 2050, 10 million people per year — that’s one person every three seconds — is going to be dying from a superbug infection,” said infectious disease epidemiologist Steffanie Strathdee, codirector of the first dedicated phage therapy center in North America ...

    Last year doctors offered to treat Horton’s infection with one of nature’s oldest predators — tiny tripod-looking viruses called phages designed to find, attack and gobble up bacteria. ... In this microscopic game of “The Terminator,” each set of phages is uniquely designed to find, attack and devour a specific type of pathogen. ... In labs around the country, phage scientists are taking research and discovery to the next level, or what Strathdee calls “phage 3.0.” Scientists in Turner’s Yale laboratory are busy mapping which phages and antibiotics are most symbiotic in the fight against a pathogen. Roach’s San Diego State lab is investigating the body’s immune response to phages while developing new phage purification techniques to prepare samples for intravenous use in patients.

    Currently, clinical trials are underway to test the effectiveness of phages against intractable urinary tract infections, chronic constipation, joint infections, diabetic foot ulcers, tonsillitis and the persistent, reoccurring infections that occur in patients with cystic fibrosis. The chronic infections common in cystic fibrosis are typically due to various strains of drug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa — the same pathogen responsible for Horton’s ear infection and the artificial tears outbreak. ...

    BELOW: This illustration of a bacteriophage shows its tripod-like form that mimics a tiny robot.

    This seems like an idea long past due. Also, why don't they just put fiber optic cables down highways and many roads so that the self-driving cars can follow those like tracks? Why is it necessary for them to drive fully on their own guidance systems???

    NEW STREET CHARGES ELECTRIC VEHICLES WHILE THEY DRIVE: IT'S NORTH AMERICA'S VERY FIRST WIRELESS CHARGING ROAD

    Engineers have turned an otherwise unnoteworthy stretch of road in downtown Detroit into what's being hailed as the first wireless-charging public road in the United States.

    Massive copper coils, much like the scaled-down ones inside your wireless phone charger, are hidden beneath the surface to charge EVs while they're stationary, idling, or even driving.

    https://futurism.com/the-byte/new-st...7J51sQk7uOv5nM
    Fossil fuels kills us ...

    New Research: Phasing Out Fossil Fuels Could Save Millions of Lives

    A study reveals that phasing out fossil fuels could prevent 5.13 million deaths per year globally linked to air pollution, primarily from cardiometabolic diseases. Utilizing a new risk model, it emphasizes the health and environmental benefits of transitioning to renewable energy sources.

    https://scitechdaily.com/new-researc...ions-of-lives/
    Clones ... not monkeying around ...

    New cloned monkey species highlights limits of cloning

    Meet Retro, a cloned rhesus monkey born on July 16, 2020. He is now more than 3 years old and is “doing well and growing strong,” ...

    ... scientists have cloned many mammalian species, including pigs, cows, horses and dogs, but the process has been hit or miss, with typically only a tiny percentage of the embryos that are transferred into surrogates resulting in viable offspring. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2024/01/16/world/...scn/index.html
    Very fishy arrests ...

    Tokyo couple arrested over unpermitted cultivation of glowing fish

    ... The police arrested Hidehiko Takeda, the 66-year-old owner of the fish shop, and his 56-year-old Thai wife Somphorn, who runs the shop, for alleged violation of the Cartagena law, which came into force in 2004 to regulate the use of genetically modified living organisms.

    The suspects sold the genetically modified Siamese fighting fish, or betta, as "neon betta" at the store, the police said. The fish glows in a yellow-green color when exposed to ultraviolet light. ...

    A step toward artificial eyes ...

    Revolutionary Biochip Mimics Human Retina: A Leap Toward Cyborg Reality


    A team of international researchers, led by Francesca Santoro from Jülich, has developed a biochip that imitates the human retina. This innovation is part of a broader effort in bioelectronics aimed at repairing bodily and brain dysfunctions. ... A new chip could help retinal implants fuse even better with the human body in the future. It is based on conductive polymers and light-sensitive molecules that can be used to imitate the retina, complete with visual pathways. ... What is exceptional about the new semiconductor is that it consists entirely of non-toxic organic components, is flexible, and works with ions, that is, with charged atoms or molecules. It can thus be integrated into biological systems much better than conventional semiconductor components made of silicon, which are rigid and only work with electrons. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/revolutiona...yborg-reality/
    Never forget this ...

    Unraveling Memory’s Molecular Mystery: How Brain Cells Stabilize Information Over Time

    Recent research discovers that our ability to distinguish similar memories improves over time due to the dynamic nature of engrams, brain cells involved in memory storage. This finding provides key insights into the treatment of memory disorders. ... The researchers developed a computational model for learning and memory formation that starts with sensory information, which is the stimulus. Once that information gets to the hippocampus, the part of the brain where memories form, different neurons are activated, some of which are excitatory and others that are inhibitory.

    When neurons are activated in the hippocampus, not all are going to be firing at once. As memories form, neurons that happen to be activated closely in time become a part of the engram and strengthen their connectivity to support future recall.

    “Activation of engram cells during memory recall is not an all or none process but rather typically needs to reach a threshold (i.e., a percentage of the original engram) for efficient recall,” Roy explains. “Our model is the first to demonstrate that the engram population is not stable: The number of engram cells that are activated during recall decreases with time, meaning they are dynamic in nature, and so the next critical question was whether this had a behavioral consequence.”

    “Over the consolidation period after learning, the brain is actively working to separate the two experiences and that’s possibly one reason why the numbers of activated engram cells decrease over time for a single memory,” he says. “If true, this would explain why memory discrimination gets better as time goes on. It’s like your memory of the experience was one big highway initially but over time, over the course of the consolidation period on the order of minutes to hours, your brain divides them into two lanes so you can discriminate between the two.”

    https://scitechdaily.com/unraveling-...ion-over-time/
    And now we can remember to watch remembering ...

    SynapShot Unveiled: Observing the Processes of Memory and Cognition in Real Time

    SynapShot, developed by an international research team, marks a major advancement in neuroscience by enabling real-time, live observation of synaptic changes in the brain. ... On January 8, a joint research team led by Professor Won Do Heo from the KAIST Department of Biological Sciences, Professor Hyung-Bae Kwon from Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, and Professor Sangkyu Lee from the Institute for Basic Science (IBS) revealed that they have developed the world’s first technique to allow real-time observation of synapse formation, extinction, and alterations.

    Professor Heo’s team conjugated dimerization-dependent fluorescent proteins (ddFP) to synapses in order to observe the process in which synapses create connections between neurons in real-time. The team named this technique SynapShot, by combining the words ‘synapse’ and snapshot’, and successfully tracked and observed the live formation and extinction processes of synapses as well as their dynamic changes. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/synapshot-u...-in-real-time/
    AI gets a prize ...

    The winner of a prestigious Japanese literary award has confirmed AI helped write her book

    After Japanese author Rie Kudan won one of the country’s most prestigious literary awards, she admitted she’d had help from an unusual source — ChatGPT.

    “I plan to continue to profit from the use of AI in the writing of my novels, while letting my creativity express itself to the fullest,” said the 33-year-old, who was awarded the Akutagawa Prize for the best work of fiction by a promising new writer on Wednesday.

    The author then confirmed at a press conference that around 5% of her book “The Tokyo Tower of Sympathy” — which was lauded by committee members as “practically flawless” — was word-for-word generated by AI.

    The novel centers around the dilemmas of an architect tasked with building a comfortable high-rise prison in Tokyo where law breakers are rehabilitated, and features AI as a theme.

    Kudan said that, in her own life, she would consult ChatGPT about problems she felt she couldn’t tell anyone. “When the AI did not say what I expected,” she said, “I sometimes reflected my feelings in the lines of the main character.” ...

    ... Writer and prize committee member Keiichiro Hirano took to X, the social media company formerly known as Twitter, to say the selection committee did not see Kudan’s use of AI as a problem.

    “It seems that the story that Rie Kudan’s award-winning work was written using generative AI is misunderstood… If you read it, you will see that the generative AI was mentioned in the work,” he wrote. “There will be problems with that kind of usage in the future, but that is not the case with ‘Tokyo Sympathy Tower.’” ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2024/01/19/style/...gpt/index.html
    Latest on the Japanese landing from JAXA in Tsukuba, a great success in some ways ...

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) has announced that it has disconnected the battery from the circuit and turned off the power to restore the SLIM, the Japanese unmanned lunar probe that successfully landed on the Moon on January 20, because the onboard solar cells are not generating power. The organization is hopeful that the solar cells may be able to generate electricity if they are exposed to sunlight in the future.

    https://www.france24.com/en/asia-pac...LQO596XISgvPJc
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    Last edited by Jundo; 01-23-2024 at 02:43 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  45. #1045
    Good news at our JAXA space center here in Tsukuba ...

    Japan’s SLIM probe regains power more than a week after moon landing

    Japan’s SLIM spacecraft has regained power, its space agency said on Monday, more than a week after it achieved an unconventionally precise lunar landing but ran out of electricity because its solar panels were at the wrong angle.

    The Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) re-established communication with its Smart Lander for Investigating Moon (SLIM) late on Sunday, a JAXA spokesperson said, nearly nine days after the probe’s touchdown made Japan the fifth country to put a spacecraft on the moon.

    The probe was most likely able to generate power thanks to a change in the sunlight’s direction, JAXA said.

    SLIM resumed its operations to analyze the composition of olivine rocks on the lunar surface with its multi-band spectral camera, in search of clues about the origin of the moon, the agency added.

    ... [But] JAXA does not have a clear date when SLIM will end its operation on the moon, but the agency has previously said the lander was not designed to survive a lunar night. The next lunar night begins on Thursday. ...

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/world/j...ing-rcna136119
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  46. #1046
    Elon is finally in our heads ... literally ...

    Elon Musk says his Neuralink startup has implanted a chip in its first human brain

    ... The operation took place on Sunday and the patient was recovering well, he added. ... Neuralink’s first product would be called Telepathy, he said in another post, adding that its initial users will be people who have lost the use of their limbs. “Imagine if Stephen Hawking could communicate faster than a speed typist or auctioneer. That is the goal,” he wrote. ... In May last year, Neuralink received FDA clearance for human clinical trials, and a few months later, the startup began recruiting patients with quadriplegia caused by cervical spinal cord injury or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). ... Trial patients will have a chip surgically placed in the part of the brain that controls the intention to move. The chip, installed by a robot, will then record and send brain signals to an app, with the initial goal being “to grant people the ability to control a computer cursor or keyboard using their thoughts alone,” the company wrote in September.

    https://us.cnn.com/2024/01/30/busine...hnk/index.html

    More here: https://edition.cnn.com/2024/01/30/h...nts/index.html

    Makes my mind spiral ...

    Webb telescope captures 'stunning' images of 19 spiral galaxies

    A batch of newly released images captured by the James Webb Space Telescope show in remarkable detail 19 spiral galaxies residing relatively near our Milky Way, offering new clues on star formation as well as galactic structure and evolution. ... The closest of the 19 galaxies is called NGC5068, about 15 million light years from Earth, and the most distant of them is NGC1365, about 60 million light years from Earth. A light year is the distance light travels in a year, 5.9 trillion miles (9.5 trillion km). ...

    https://www.reuters.com/technology/s...es-2024-01-29/

    Get you head around this ...

    Revolution in AI: New Brain-Like Transistor Mimics Human Intelligence

    Researchers have developed a novel synaptic transistor that mimics the human brain’s integrated processing and memory capabilities. This device operates at room temperature, is energy-efficient, and can perform complex cognitive tasks such as associative learning, making it a significant advancement in the field of artificial intelligence. ... This advanced device not only processes but also stores information, mirroring the multifunctional nature of the human brain. Recent experiments by the team have shown that this transistor goes beyond simple machine-learning tasks to categorize data and is capable of performing associative learning.

    Although previous studies have leveraged similar strategies to develop brain-like computing devices, those transistors cannot function outside cryogenic temperatures. The new device, by contrast, is stable at room temperatures. It also operates at fast speeds, consumes very little energy and retains stored information even when power is removed, making it ideal for real-world applications.

    The study was recently published in the journal Nature.

    https://scitechdaily.com/revolution-...-intelligence/
    A reactor in your pocket ...

    STARTUP SAYS ITS COIN-SIZED NUCLEAR BATTERY COULD FLY DRONES "CONTINUOUSLY" -- IT WORKS BY HARNESSING ENERGY FROM NUCLEAR DECAY.

    Imagine never having to change a battery in a device ever again — or, in fact, a battery that could outlive you.

    That’s what Betavolt, a Chinese tech company, is claiming with its newly unveiled miniature nuclear battery that it says can keep working for up to 50 years.

    The Beijing-based company claims to have entered the "pilot stage" for the battery, which is smaller than a coin and will soon put it into mass production.

    The company anticipates the battery being used in industries ranging from aerospace to robotics and to smartphones.

    "If policies permit, atomic energy batteries can allow a mobile phone to never be charged, and drones that can only fly for 15 minutes can fly continuously," the company claims. ... The battery measures at 15 x 15 x 5 millimeters and is made of wafer-thin layers of nuclear isotopes and diamond semiconductors. It's a type of betavoltaic device, meaning it works by harnessing energy released from radioactive isotopes, in this case an isotope of nickel, by picking up and converting electrons as the material decays.

    Betavolt says the radiation poses no danger to the human body, making it usable in medical devices such as pacemakers. The nickel isotope decays to a stable copper isotope, making it easily recyclable. ...

    https://www.zmescience.com/science/n...y-no-charging/

    Keeping our genes to ourselves ...

    US House bill would curb genetic info sharing with China's Wuxi Apptec, BGI

    A congressional committee focused on China has introduced a bill that would restrict federally funded medical providers from allowing China's BGI Group, WuXi Apptec (603259.SS), opens new tab and other biotech companies from getting genetic information about Americans. ... "Closing this loophole is the first step in protecting the American bioeconomy and our national security, and ensuring our genomic data is kept safe and secure,” said Democratic committee member Raja Krishnamoorthi. ...

    Units of BGI Group appear on a U.S. Department of Commerce export control list over allegations that they pose a "significant risk" to contributing to Chinese government surveillance. Reuters also has reported that BGI was collecting genetic data from millions of women for sweeping research on the traits of populations, and collaborates with China's military. ...

    https://www.reuters.com/world/us/us-...gi-2024-01-26/
    Early and complex ...

    Early Complex Life Forms Revealed: 1.63-billion-year-old Multicellular Fossils Unearthed in China

    Researchers unveiled 1.63-billion-year-old multicellular fossils from North China, marking the oldest record of multicellular eukaryotes and pushing back the timeline for the emergence of multicellularity in eukaryotes by about 70 million years. This discovery highlights the complexity of early life forms and supports the early appearance of the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) in the evolutionary history.

    ... All complex life on Earth, including diverse animals, land plants, macroscopic fungi, and seaweeds, are multicellular eukaryotes. Multicellularity is key to eukaryotes acquiring organismal complexity and large size, and is often regarded as a major transition in the history of life on Earth. However, scientists have been unsure when eukaryotes evolved this innovation. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/early-compl...thed-in-china/
    A picture taken by a really tiny dentist ...

    Scientists report world’s first X-ray of a single atom in Nature

    A team of scientists from Ohio University, Argonne National Laboratory, the University of Illinois-Chicago, and others, led by Ohio University Professor of Physics, and Argonne National Laboratory scientist, Saw Wai Hla, have taken the world’s first X-ray SIGNAL (or SIGNATURE) of just one atom. This groundbreaking achievement was funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences and could revolutionize the way scientists detect the materials. ...

    BELOW: An image of a ring shaped supramolecule where only one Fe atom is present in the entire ring.

    to be continued ...
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  47. #1047
    ... continued from above ...

    Did scientists reverse time??? ... Well, not really ...

    ‘We have made science fiction come true!’ Scientists prove particles in a quantum system can be rejuvenated

    An Austrian and Spanish team demonstrated that a process can be ‘rewound’ to restore the components of an atom to their previous state


    Spanish researchers [have published experiments] proving it’s possible to “accelerate, decelerate and reverse the flow of time within arbitrary, even uncontrolled quantum systems.” These unique physical processes, capable of disrupting the normal course of time, are universal: they have the same effect on all particles, regardless of their nature and interaction with other systems. ... these quantum particles can be rejuvenated or reverted to a previous state. Miguel Navascués uses an analogy to explain the significance of the finding and how they proved it. “In a theater, [classical physics], a movie is projected from beginning to end, regardless of what the audience wants. But at home [the quantum world], we have a remote control to manipulate the movie. We can rewind to a previous scene or skip several scenes ahead.” ... The ÖAW team developed a “rewind protocol” that enables any particle (electron, proton or muon) to revert to a previous state. Trillo led the way in proving this capacity theoretically and experimentally using a photon that evolves when it passes through a crystal. The creative use of an experimental device known as a “quantum switch” allows the light particle to return to its state at the beginning of its journey. ...

    ... While it’s theoretically possible to replicate the experience with a human, it is a practical impossibility and useless. “If we could lock a person in a box with zero external influences, it would be theoretically possible. But with our currently available protocols, the probability of success would be very, very low. Also, the time needed to complete the process depends on the amount of information the system can store. A human being is a physical system that contains an enormous amount of information. It would take millions of years to rejuvenate a person for less than a second, so it doesn’t make sense.” ...

    The finding is not a time machine. Time passes regardless, and it is the physical state that changes. “If you want to revert a particle capable of storing one bit of information to its state five minutes ago, that’s the amount of time needed to complete the process,” said Navascués. ...

    https://english.elpais.com/science-t...juvenated.html


    Toyota is not into it ...

    TOYOTA SLAMS ELECTRIC CARS, SAYS THEY'LL NEVER CATCH ON: CUSTOMERS ARE "FINALLY SEEING REALITY."

    ... Even with big inventories, fewer buyers are choosing to go electric for a number of reasons, including price and a lack of charging infrastructure.

    Now, Akio Toyoda, chairman of Japanese carmaker Toyota, is doubling down on that pessimism, arguing during a business event earlier this month that the latest EV trends are warnings signs, with customers "finally seeing reality."

    "The enemy is CO2," he argued. "No matter how much progress [battery] EVs make, I think they will still only have a 30 percent market share." The rest will be taken up by hybrid EVs and hydrogen fuel cell-powered cars, he argued. ... Toyota has been bearish on electric vehicles and has been notably slow to adopt the technology, which has come to the disappointment of shareholders. ...

    https://fortune.com/2023/10/25/toyot...ngs-elon-musk/
    A new tool ...

    Unlocking DNA’s Secrets: Cutting-Edge Tool Finds Genetic Variants That Cause Diseases

    A new statistical tool developed by researchers at the University of Chicago improves the ability to find genetic variants that cause disease. The tool, described in a new paper published January 26, 2024, in Nature Genetics, combines data from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) and predictions of genetic expression to limit the number of false positives and more accurately identify causal genes and variants for a disease. ...

    Most human diseases are not caused by a single genetic variation, however. Instead, they are the result of a complex interaction of multiple genes, environmental factors, and host of other variables. As a result, GWAS often identifies many variants across many regions in the genome that are associated with a disease. The limitation of GWAS, however, is that it only identifies association, not causality. In a typical genomic region, many variants are highly correlated with each other, due to a phenomenon called linkage disequilibrium. This is because DNA is passed from one generation to next in entire blocks, not individual genes, so variants nearby each other tend to be correlated. ... “You may have many genetic variants in a block that are all correlated with disease risk, but you don’t know which one is actually the causal variant,” said Xin He, PhD, Associate Professor of Human Genetics, and senior author of the new study. “That’s the fundamental challenge of GWAS, that is, how we go from association to causality.” ... To make the problem even harder, most of the genetic variants are located in non-coding genomes, making their effects difficult to interpret. ...

    ... In the new study, Prof. He and Matthew Stephens, PhD, the Ralph W. Gerard Professor and Chair of the Departments of Statistics and Professor of Human Genetics, developed a new method called causal-Transcriptome-wide Association studies, or cTWAS, that uses advanced statistical techniques to reduce false positive rates. Instead of focusing on just one gene at a time, the new cTWAS model accounts for multiple genes and variants. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/unlocking-d...ause-diseases/
    Maybe a good fishing spot?

    Mars rover data confirms ancient lake sediments on red planet

    NASA's rover Perseverance has gathered data confirming the existence of ancient lake sediments deposited by water that once filled a giant basin on Mars called Jezero Crater, according to a study published on Friday. The findings from ground-penetrating radar observations conducted by the robotic rover substantiate previous orbital imagery and other data leading scientists to theorize that portions of Mars were once covered in water and may have harbored microbial life. ... The findings reinforced what previous studies have long suggested - that cold, arid, lifeless Mars was once warm, wet and perhaps habitable. ... Scientists look forward to an up-close examination of Jezero's sediments - thought to have formed some 3 billion years ago - in samples collected by Perseverance for future transport to Earth. ...


    https://www.reuters.com/science/mars...rs-2024-01-27/
    As long as it does not escape and eat everything plastic in my house ...

    Engineered Bacteria Eat Waste Plastic and Make Spider Silk – “Nature’s Kevlar”

    Move over Spider-Man: Researchers at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a strain of bacteria that can turn plastic waste into a biodegradable spider silk with multiple uses. ... Their new study marks the first time scientists have used bacteria to transform polyethylene plastic — the kind used in many single-use items — into a high-value protein product.

    That product, which the researchers call “bio-inspired spider silk” because of its similarity to the silk spiders use to spin their webs, has applications in textiles, cosmetics, and even medicine. ... Polyethylene plastic, found in products such as plastic bags, water bottles, and food packaging, is the biggest contributor to plastic pollution globally and can take upward of 1,000 years to degrade naturally. ... “What’s really exciting about this process is that, unlike the way plastics are produced today, our process is low energy and doesn’t require the use of toxic chemicals,” Zha said. “The best chemists in the world could not convert polyethylene into spider silk, but these bacteria can. We’re really harnessing what nature has developed to do manufacturing for us.”

    However, before upcycled spider silk products become a reality, the researchers will first need to find ways to make the silk protein more efficiently. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/engineered-...atures-kevlar/
    No coincidence?

    Fulton County [Georgia, USA] government outage: Cyberattack brings down phones, court site and tax systems

    ... The outage has not been resolved, and it’s unclear when systems would return to normal.

    The office of the county’s District Attorney Fani Willis lost access to its phones, internet and the court system website, according to a source with direct knowledge of the matter. Willis indicted former President Donald Trump and 18 co-defendants in a 2020 election subversion case. Officials have not declared any connection between the attack and the election subversion case, and they have assigned no motive. ...

    https://edition.cnn.com/2024/01/30/t...ack/index.html
    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  48. #1048
    This is something ...


    ... also ...

    Last edited by Jundo; 01-31-2024 at 02:22 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  49. #1049
    Water water everywhere ...

    For the First Time: Water Molecules Have Been Discovered on an Asteroid’s Surface

    ... researchers have identified water molecules on asteroid surfaces, marking a significant step in understanding water’s distribution and its role in the solar system’s formation and potential for supporting life. ... Scientists looked at four silicate-rich asteroids using the FORCAST instrument to isolate the mid-infrared spectral signatures indicative of molecular water on two of them. ... Of particular interest is the distribution of water on asteroids, because that can shed light on how water was delivered to Earth.”

    https://scitechdaily.com/for-the-fir...roids-surface/
    Speaking of water, another possible candidate for life in our solar system ...

    Mimas’ Surprise: Startling Discovery of Young Ocean Beneath Icy Shell of Saturn’s Tiny Moon

    Researchers have discovered a global ocean of liquid water beneath the surface of Mimas, one of Saturn’s smallest moons. This discovery, made possible by data from NASA’s Cassini spacecraft, highlights Mimas as a crucial site for studying the origins of life, providing insights into ocean formation and the potential for life in our Solar System. ... This discovery adds Mimas to an exclusive club of moons with internal oceans, including Enceladus and Europa, but with a unique difference: its ocean is remarkably young, estimated to be only 5 to 15 million years old.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/mimas-surpr...rns-tiny-moon/

    AND IT LOOKS LIKE THE DEATH STAR! ...

    ProtAIns ...

    Unlocking the Secrets of Proteins With Cutting-Edge AI

    DeepGO-SE, an AI tool created by KAUST researchers, revolutionizes the prediction of unknown protein functions using logical entailment and advanced language models, showing significant potential for scientific research and biotechnological applications. ... the tool outperforms existing analytical methods for forecasting protein functions and is even able to analyze proteins with no clear matches in existing datasets.
    https://scitechdaily.com/unlocking-t...tting-edge-ai/
    Robo-chemists ...

    Scientists Develop Chemical Synthesis Robot That Outperforms Human Chemists in Speed and Accuracy

    Chemical researchers at the University of Amsterdam have created a self-operating chemical synthesis robot equipped with an AI-based machine-learning system, named ‘RoboChem’. This compact laboratory instrument surpasses human chemists in speed and precision, while also displaying a high level of ingenuity. As the first of its kind, it could significantly accelerate the chemical discovery of molecules for pharmaceutical and many other applications. RoboChem’s first results were recently published in the journal Science. ... Their paper shows that RoboChem is a precise and reliable chemist that can perform a variety of reactions while producing minimal amounts of waste. Working autonomously around the clock, the system delivers results quickly and tirelessly. ...

    ... Noël says the system has impressed him with its ingenuity: ‘I have been working on photocatalysis for more than a decade now. Still, RoboChem has shown results that I would not have been able to predict. For instance, it has identified reactions that require only very little light. At times I had to scratch my head to fathom what it had done. You then wonder: would we have done it the same way? In retrospect, you see RoboChem’s logic. But I doubt if we would have obtained the same results ourselves. Or not as quickly, at least.’ ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/robochem-sc...-and-accuracy/
    Robot surgeons in space! ...

    Video shows surgeons remotely controlling robot to perform simulated surgery in space

    Surgeons in Nebraska controlled the first "surgical robot" sent to space to perform simulated surgical activities on Saturday.

    https://us.cnn.com/videos/us/2024/02...er-tsr-vpx.cnn

    Reprinting lost treasures ...

    Italy donates 3D-printed replica of statue destroyed by ISIS to Iraq

    ... Constructed in the ninth century BC, the 5-meter-tall (16-foot) “Bull of Nimrud” was destroyed by ISIS fighters in 2015, before Italian artisans made a copy of the monument using 3D-printing technology. The replica, which was previously displayed at the Colosseum in Rome and the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, has now been permanently relocated outside the entrance to the Basrah Museum in the Iraqi city of Basra. ... Following the attack, a team of experts led by restorer Nicola Salvioli studied photos and videos of the monument, allowing them to make a model in polystyrene. A 3D printer was then used to make a fiberglass copy that was covered with plastic substances mixed with stone dust to make it appear more authentic.

    https://us.cnn.com/2024/02/13/style/...tan/index.html

    3D Printed Brains ...

    SCIENTISTS 3D PRINT FUNCTIONAL HUMAN BRAIN TISSUE

    A team of scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison claim to have 3D-printed functional human brain tissue for the first time.

    They hope their research could open the doors for the development of treatments for existing neurological disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease.

    As detailed in a new paper published in the journal Cell Stem Cell, the team flipped the usual method of 3D-printing on its side, fabricating horizontal layers of brain cells encased in soft "bio-ink" gel. "The tissue still has enough structure to hold together but it is soft enough to allow the neurons to grow into each other and start talking to each other," said coauthor and UW–Madison neuroscience professor Su-Chun Zhang in a statement.

    Thanks to this arrangement, each of these neurons, which were grown from pluripotent stem cells, had enough access to oxygen and nutrients from growth media. In experiments, the cells started forming networks, much like the human brain, and could even communicate with each other through the neurotransmitters they formed. "We printed the cerebral cortex and the striatum and what we found was quite striking," Zhang explained in the statement. "Even when we printed different cells belonging to different parts of the brain, they were still able to talk to each other in a very special and specific way."

    https://www.waisman.wisc.edu/2024/02...-brain-tissue/
    Ancient code solved ...

    a team of researchers has revealed several nearly complete passages from the ancient text, giving insight into philosophy from almost 2,000 years ago.

    The Herculaneum scrolls are hundreds of papyri that survived the eruption of Mount Vesuvius in AD 79. In their charred state, the ancient documents would crumble if anyone attempted to unroll them, and any writing on surviving pieces would be nearly illegible to the human eye. By using computer technology and advanced artificial intelligence, researchers can now analyze the Herculaneum scrolls without unrolling and risking damage to the extremely fragile documents. More than 2,000 characters — the first full passages — have been deciphered from a scroll ... In the deciphered text, Philodemus writes on “pleasure,” and whether the abundance of goods available can affect the amount of pleasure they give. “As too in the case of food, we do not right away believe things that are scarce to be absolutely more pleasant than those which are abundant,” the first sentence reads.

    “Philodemus was dismissed over the years because we couldn’t really read his passages extensively. Only with difficulty, we just get these little snippets. … (In these passages) he’s persuading the people who are listening to him to sort of relax, find good friendships, spend your time living in the moment and enjoying pleasures,”


    https://us.cnn.com/2024/02/07/world/...scn/index.html
    [/QUOTE]

    Viruses are sometimes good for us ... and are us ...

    Virus That Infected the First Animals Hundreds of Millions of Years Ago Is Essential for Embryo Development

    CNIO researchers have discovered the essential role of endogenous retroviruses in embryonic development, specifically in the transition from totipotency to pluripotency. This study, which challenges the previous notion of ‘junk DNA’, sheds light on the symbiotic relationship between viral genes and early embryonic development, with implications for regenerative medicine. ... At least 8% of the human genome is genetic material from viruses. It was considered ‘junk DNA’ until recently, but its role in human development is now known to be essential
    ... All animals have evolved thanks to the fact that certain viruses infected primitive organisms hundreds of millions of years ago. Viral genetic material was integrated into the genome of the first multi-cellular beings and is still in our DNA today. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/virus-that-...o-development/
    But sometimes viruses are not good ...

    Millions of people have long Covid, including children and pregnant people, studies show

    Millions of people deal with Covid-19 symptoms long after their initial infections. Two new studies – one looking at pregnant people and the other on children – give a better look at the burden from this health problem that doctors say often goes under the radar.

    https://us.cnn.com/2024/02/12/health...ren/index.html
    Bacteria from way back then ...

    New Clues to the First Life on Earth – Researchers Uncover 3.42 Billion-Year-Old Microbial Mysteries

    researchers led by the University of Göttingen and Linnӕus University in Sweden have uncovered key findings about the earliest forms of life. In rock samples from South Africa, they found evidence dating to around 3.42 billion years ago of an unprecedentedly diverse carbon cycle involving various microorganisms. This research shows that complex microbial communities already existed in the ecosystems during the Palaeoarchaean period. The results were published in the journal Precambrian Research.

    BELOW: A drill core sample from the Barberton greenstone belt used in the study. The dark layers contain particles of carbonaceous matter, the altered remains from Palaeoarchaean microorganisms.

    Brain games ...

    VIDEO SHOWS HUMAN BRAIN CELLS IN DISH TEACHING THEMSELVES TO PLAY A VIDEOGAME

    In a groundbreaking study published in the journal Neuron, scientists were, for the first time, able to show that 800,000 living brain cells trapped in a petri dish can be taught how to play Pong.

    "We have shown we can interact with living biological neurons in such a way that compels them to modify their activity," Brett Kagan, chief scientific officer at biotech startup Cortical Labs, said in a press release, "leading to something that resembles intelligence."

    For their study, the researchers used both mouse and human cells — the former taken from embryonic mouse brains, while the latter were derived from human stem cells. The cells were then grown on top of microelectrode arrays, which, as the press release explains, could "both stimulate them and read their activity."

    From there, it was game on. Literally. A video of the experiment shows the brain cells successfully flinging the ball back and forth.

    Goggle eyes ...

    Some Apple Vision Pro users love the new device. Many online thinks it’s dystopian.
    Videos of people sporting the new augmented reality headset have caused a stir across social media in the last week.


    The wearable product, which costs $3,500, allows users to see apps, email, video games and more integrated with their real-world surroundings. Since its release last week, some people have shared video of themselves testing it out, while others have made videos observing people who look out of place while using it in public spaces.
    Holy spinning black hole! ...

    Telescopes Reveal Rapid Spin of Milky Way’s Black Hole Warping Spacetime

    A new study may help settle the question of how rapidly the Milky Way’s supermassive black hole is spinning. The black hole, known as Sagittarius A* (Sgr A*), contains about 4 million times the mass of the Sun. Using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory and NSF’s Very Large Array, this study found Sgr A* is spinning very rapidly. This high spin is warping the spacetime around Sgr A* so it appears to have the shape of an American football. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/telescopes-...ing-spacetime/

    Really small gravity ...

    Beyond the Visible Universe: New Research Reveals How Gravity Influences the Quantum Realm

    Nuclear physicists have discovered gravity’s profound influence on the quantum scale, revealing the strong force’s distribution within protons for the first time. This groundbreaking research, combining historical theoretical insights with modern experimental data, offers unprecedented understanding of the proton’s internal dynamics and sets the stage for future discoveries in nuclear science. ... The research has now revealed, for the first time, a snapshot of the distribution of the strong force inside the proton. This snapshot details the shear stress the force may exert on the quark particles that make up the proton. The result was recently published in Reviews of Modern Physics.

    https://scitechdaily.com/beyond-the-...quantum-realm/
    Invisible launch ... looking for almost invisible threats ...

    New NASA mission launches to observe ‘invisible universe’ on Earth

    ... A revolutionary new satellite that will provide an unprecedented look at Earth’s microscopic marine life and tiny atmospheric particles has launched. The NASA PACE, or Plankton, Aerosol, Cloud, and ocean Ecosystem, mission lifted off at 1:33 a.m. ET Thursday aboard a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket from Cape Canaveral Space Force Station in Florida. ... https://us.cnn.com/2024/02/08/world/...nce%20Division. ,,,
    (to be continued)

    Gassho, Jundo
    Last edited by Jundo; 02-16-2024 at 02:13 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  50. #1050
    (continued) ...

    Over and out ... but not so fast or final ...

    Death’s Riddle: Scientists Decipher the Brain’s Final Signals

    Defining death from a neurological perspective is challenging. It’s not an exact moment of transition from life to death, but rather a process spanning several minutes, which in certain instances can be reversed. Researchers from the “Dynamics of Epileptic Networks and Neuronal Excitability” team at the Paris Brain Institute have demonstrated in a prior study that after a long period of oxygen deprivation—called anoxia—brain activity undergoes a cascade of successive changes that can now be described precisely.

    When the brain stops receiving oxygen, its stores of ATP, the cells’ fuel, are rapidly depleted. This causes a disruption in the electrical balance of neurons and a massive release of glutamate, an essential excitatory neurotransmitter in the nervous system. “Neural circuits seem to shut down at first… Then we see a surge in brain activity—specifically an increase in gamma and beta waves,” Séverine Mahon, a researcher in neuroscience, explains. “These waves are usually associated with a conscious experience. In this context, they may be involved in near-death experiences reported by people who have survived cardiorespiratory arrest.”

    After that, the activity of the neurons gradually diminishes until a state of perfect electrical silence— corresponding to a flat electroencephalogram—is reached. However, this silence is quickly interrupted by the depolarization of neurons, which takes the form of a high-amplitude wave known as the “wave of death”, which alters the function and structure of the brain. “This critical event, called anoxic depolarization, induces neuronal death throughout the cortex. Like a swan song, it is the true marker of transition towards the cessation of all brain activity,” ...

    ... We also know that a flat EEG does not necessarily mean the definitive cessation of brain functions,” Prof. Stéphane Charpier, head of the research team, concludes. “We now need to establish the exact conditions under which these functions can be restored and develop neuroprotective drugs to support resuscitation in the event of heart and lung failure.” ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/deaths-ridd...final-signals/
    Sad genes ... Eurocentric depression ...

    Depression Decoded: 200+ Genes Unveiled in Global Study

    In a landmark study led by UCL researchers, over 200 genes associated with depression were identified, utilizing data from nearly one million people of diverse ancestries. This research not only broadens our understanding of the genetic factors contributing to depression but also opens new pathways for developing treatments, including the repurposing of existing drugs like the diabetes medication metformin. ...

    ... Surprisingly, the researchers found less overlap in the genetic hits for depression across ancestry groups than expected, at about 30% (based on a new method developed by the research team, to gauge the degree to which a genetic association found in one ancestry group is applicable to another ancestry group), which is less overlap than previously found for other traits and diseases. Therefore, it is even more important to study depression in diverse samples because some of the findings might be ancestry specific.

    Lead author Professor Karoline Kuchenbaecker (UCL Psychiatry and UCL Genetics Institute) said: “Here we show beyond doubt that our understanding of such complex diseases as depression will remain incomplete until we overcome the Eurocentric bias in genetics research and look for causes in diverse people across the world.

    “Many genes previously found to be linked to the risk of depression might only actually affect depression risk in people of European origin, so in order for genetic research to contribute to new drugs that can help people of all ancestries, it is vital that our genetic datasets are suitably diverse.”

    https://scitechdaily.com/depression-...-global-study/
    Moon River ...

    Lunar Hydrosphere Unveiled: Discovery Changes Understanding of Water’s History on the Moon

    New research from a Western University postdoctoral fellow shows the early lunar crust, which makes up the surface of the Moon, was considerably enriched in water more than 4 billion years ago, counter to previously held understanding. The discovery is outlined in a study published on January 15 in the high impact journal Nature Astronomy. ... “Unravelling the history of water in the earliest-formed lunar crust approximately 4.5 billion years ago is important for improving our understanding of the origin of water in the Solar System. Ancient rock samples from the Moon in the form of lunar meteorites provide an excellent opportunity for undertaking such investigations,” ...
    More water, more room for life ...

    Expanding the Universe’s Habitable Zone: New Research Reshapes Our Search for Alien Worlds

    New research redefines the Habitable Zone of exoplanets by considering subglacial liquid water, extending potentially habitable conditions beyond traditional boundaries. Supported by recent JWST observations, this study broadens the scope for finding life on exoplanets, especially those orbiting M-dwarf stars. ... The classical Habitable Zone, often colloquially referred to as the “Goldilocks Zone,” typically defines the region around a star where conditions allow the presence of surface liquid water and, by extension, life as we understand it. However, Professor Wandel’s research offers a fresh perspective by illustrating that the existence of subglacial liquid water can considerably extend this zone. ... The study delineates how an atmosphere and liquid water could coexist on these planets, pushing the limits of the Habitable Zone further than previously assumed. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/expanding-t...-alien-worlds/
    Buncha darn immigrants ...

    Unearthing Europe’s First Homo sapiens 45,000 Years Later

    The arrival of Homo sapiens in cold northern latitudes took place several thousand years before Neanderthals disappeared in southwest Europe.

    The three published studies describe the Homo sapiens fossils from Ilsenhöhle at Ranis and their associated context (Mylopotamitaki et al.), the diet and lifeways of these first pioneers (Smith et al.), and the environmental conditions they faced in Central and NW Europe (Pederzani et al.).

    ... It turns out that stone artifacts that were thought to be produced by Neanderthals were in fact part of the early H. sapiens tool kit. This fundamentally changes our previous knowledge about this time period: H. sapiens reached northwestern Europe long before Neanderthal disappearance in southwestern Europe, ...

    ... Radiocarbon dating was used to understand when humans occupied the cave. Homo sapiens bones from both the 1930s and 2016 to 2022 excavations were directly dated using very small amounts of bone to preserve the material for further analyses. The dates show that these individuals were some of the earliest Homo sapiens to inhabit Europe. ...
    Furthermore, the team found that Homo sapiens ventured into Europe under severe cold climatic conditions. Moving in small groups, they shared their environment and sites with large carnivores, like hyenas, and they manufactured elaborately crafted leaf-shaped stone tools.

    “The results from the Ilsenhöhle in Ranis fundamentally change our ideas about the chronology and settlement history of Europe north of the Alps. It is especially exciting that we now have the oldest H. sapiens here in Thuringia, Germany,” says Tim Schüler of the Thüringisches Landesamt für Denkmalpflege und Archäologie.
    https://scitechdaily.com/unearthing-...0-years-later/

    BELOW: Human bone fragment from the new excavations at Ranis.

    Japan lift ...

    7.5 Magnitude Earthquake Lifts Parts of Japan Up to 13 Feet

    Some parts of the peninsula rose up to 4 meters (13 feet), shifting the position of coastlines and leaving some ports dry. ...

    https://scitechdaily.com/7-5-magnitu...up-to-13-feet/
    Can't trust our own eyes and ears these days ...

    Finance worker pays out $25 million after video call with deepfake ‘chief financial officer’

    A finance worker at a multinational firm was tricked into paying out $25 million to fraudsters using deepfake technology to pose as the company’s chief financial officer in a video conference call, according to Hong Kong police.

    The elaborate scam saw the worker duped into attending a video call with what he thought were several other members of staff, but all of whom were in fact deepfake recreations, Hong Kong police said at a briefing on Friday.

    “(In the) multi-person video conference, it turns out that everyone [he saw] was fake,” senior superintendent Baron Chan Shun-ching told the city’s public broadcaster RTHK.

    Chan said the worker had grown suspicious after he received a message that was purportedly from the company’s UK-based chief financial officer. Initially, the worker suspected it was a phishing email, as it talked of the need for a secret transaction to be carried out.

    However, the worker put aside his early doubts after the video call because other people in attendance had looked and sounded just like colleagues he recognized, Chan said.

    Believing everyone else on the call was real, the worker agreed to remit a total of $200 million Hong Kong dollars – about $25.6 million, the police officer added.

    The case is one of several recent episodes in which fraudsters are believed to have used deepfake technology to modify publicly available video and other footage to cheat people out of money. ...

    ... On at least 20 occasions, AI deepfakes had been used to trick facial recognition programs by imitating the people pictured on the identity cards, according to police. ...

    https://us.cnn.com/2024/02/04/asia/d...hnk/index.html
    AI faked elections too ...

    A fake recording of a candidate saying he’d rigged the election went viral. Experts say it’s only the beginning

    Days before a pivotal election in Slovakia to determine who would lead the country, a damning audio recording spread online in which one of the top candidates seemingly boasted about how he’d rigged the election.

    And if that wasn’t bad enough, his voice could be heard on another recording talking about raising the cost of beer.

    The recordings immediately went viral on social media, and the candidate, who is pro-NATO and aligned with Western interests, was defeated in September by an opponent who supported closer ties to Moscow and Russian President Vladimir Putin.

    https://us.cnn.com/2024/02/01/politi...nvs/index.html
    AI hard to detect ...

    Why AI-generated audio is so hard to detect
    Dozens of tools and apps have sprung up to try to detect AI-created audio, but they are inherently flawed, experts told NBC News.


    ... While dozens of tools and products have popped up to try to detect AI-generated audio, those programs are inherently limited, experts told NBC News, and won’t provide a surefire way for anyone to quickly and reliably determine whether audio they hear is from a real person.

    Deepfake detection systems work very differently from how human beings listen. They analyze audio samples for artifacts like missing frequencies that are often left behind when audio is programmatically generated. Often, they focus on particular aspects of speech, like how the speaker seems to breathe or how much the pitch of their voice goes up and down. ...

    Most detection programs are trained to identify existing deepfake algorithms, making them a step behind new innovations, he said. “Machine learning is really good at telling you about something it’s seen before, but it’s not so good about reasoning about things it hasn’t seen,” Traynor said.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/tech/misinfo...del-rcna136634
    What would this sentence look like as a picture?

    OpenAI introduces AI model that turns text into video

    Microsoft-backed OpenAI is working on a software that can generate minute-long videos based on text prompts, the company said on Thursday. The software, called Sora, is currently available for red teaming, which helps identify flaws in the AI system, as well as for use by visual artists, designers and filmmakers to gain feedback on the model, the company said in a statement. "Sora is able to generate complex scenes with multiple characters, specific types of motion, and accurate details of the subject and background," the statement said, adding that it can create multiple shots within a single video. ... Apart from generating videos from text prompts, Sora can animate a still image ...

    https://www.reuters.com/technology/o...eo-2024-02-15/
    AI Child ...

    World’s first AI child unveiled in Beijing by award-winning Chinese scientist who left US for China

    The AI entity has been unveiled at an exhibition by the Beijing Institute for General Artificial Intelligence

    Called Tong Tong, or Little Girl, she can assign herself tasks, learn autonomously and explore her environment


    As the South China Morning Post reports, visitors at the Frontiers of General Artificial Intelligence Technology Exhibition held in Beijing at the end of January were able to interact with the avatar representing Tong Tong, a virtual toddler whose name translates to "Little Girl" in English.

    Created at the Beijing Institute for General Artificial Intelligence (BIGAI) — which, yes, are dedicated to building artificial general intelligence, or human-level AI — Tong Tong is the brainchild of Zhu Songchun, the institute's computer scientist founder who specializes in "cognitive artificial intelligence," or AI designed to mimic human cognition. While AI avatars can have all kinds of simulated appearances and personalities, they say Tong Tong is designed to break new technical ground by not only executing tasks given to her in a virtual environment, but independently giving herself new tasks as well.

    "Tong Tong possesses a mind and strives to understand the common sense taught by humans," a Chinese-language video from BIGAI about the child sim says, per SCMP's translation. "She discerns right from wrong, expresses her attitudes in various situations, and has the power to shape the future." https://www.scmp.com/news/china/scie...-child-beijing
    Faster then light ... but which reality? ...

    TRAVELING FASTER THAN LIGHT WOULD MEAN EXPERIENCING MULTIPLE TIMELINES SIMULTANEOUSLY

    An international team of physicists has cooked up with a new theory that could allow for objects to travel faster than the speed of light — and while they say it wouldn't technically violate the laws of physics, it would lead to phenomena so mind-bending that it'd make the end of "Interstellar" look normal. ... How, you might ask? Through a "1+3 space-time" framework, which flips the idea of three spatial dimensions and one time dimension in favor of three time dimensions and a single spatial dimension ...

    Based on this new model, superluminal objects would look like a particle expanding like a bubble through space – not unlike a wave through a field. The high-speed object, on the other hand, would 'experience' several different timelines.

    Even so, the speed of light in a vacuum would remain constant even for those observers going faster than it, which preserves one of Einstein's fundamental principles – a principle that has previously only been thought about in relation to observers going slower than the speed of light (like all of us). ...

    https://www.sciencealert.com/study-s...-and-its-weird

    https://iopscience.iop.org/article/1...61-6382/acad60


    Gassho, J

    stlah
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

Page 21 of 21 FirstFirst ... 11192021

Tags for this Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •