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Thread: In Memory of My Teacher, Gudo Wafu Nishijima Roshi ( & re-issue of his book )

  1. #1

    In Memory of My Teacher, Gudo Wafu Nishijima Roshi ( & re-issue of his book )


    Let me also mention that January 28th is the anniversary of his passing in 2014 since the passing from this visible world of my Teacher, Gudo Wafu Nishijima Roshi. He was 94 by the calendar.

    I would like to mention his book which I translated and which was re-issued after his death, "A Heart to Heart Chat with Old Master Gudo":


    The original edition was first published in English over 10 years ago as a translation and update (in close conjunction with Roshi while he was alive) of his Japanese book "Gudo Rojin Bukkyo Mondo", but went out of print for several years. For the new edition, one significant addition, however, is an Appendix featuring a short biography, photographs and translated talks by Niwa Rempo Zenji, Nishijima Roshi's Teacher, Abbot of Eiheiji (Dogen's Temple) and Head of the Soto School, who we also recall during our upcoming memorial days. The talks, which I adapted from transcripts of old television interviews which Niwa Zenji gave many years ago, offer a small taste of his personality and teachings.


    In the book "A Heart to Heart Chat", Nishijima Roshi offers his opinions and insights into Buddhism, Zen Practice and religion in general. The book was meant as a successor to his earlier book in English, To Meet the Real Dragon, covering many of the same topics and ideas but approaching them from different perspectives, offering deeper explanation on various important points. As I express in the Translator's Forward, Nishijima was an insightful reformer, ahead of his time in speaking of Zazen Practice in modern medical and scientific terms. He did have a few ideas rather unique to his own thinking, which I discuss honestly in the forward. I also discuss, as an appendix to the book, the many good effects that I believe Nishijima Roshi will leave as his legacy to the Zen world (I have previously published that appendix as his Obituary here: LINK )

    Part of my Translator's Introduction to the current book reads as follows:


    My Teacher, Gudo Wafu Nishijima Roshi, died this year, still sitting daily Zazen at age 94. In manner, he was a soft-spoken, gentle, conservative man of his times, born nearly a century ago in Taisho era Japan. In action, he was a perceptive commentator on the current state and future of Zen Buddhism; a critic and outspoken reformer (even if largely ignored by the Buddhist establishment); and a creative and original (if sometimes slightly unorthodox) visionary and philosopher who sought to express Zen and Mahayana Buddhist teachings in unique and helpful ways understandable to people of modern times. I believe that what he stood for will have lasting, positive effects on the future of Soto Zen Buddhism in Japan and the West, and that his many students (not, by any means, all cut of the same cloth) will carry on his legacy. First and foremost, Nishijima cherished Zazen as the fulfillment of reality itself, the proper centerpiece of all Buddhist practice.

    Nishijima was a traditional Zen teacher in some ways, yet also someone who foresaw great changes in Buddhist customs as practices encounter new times, places and cultures. While he was aware that the outer wrappings of Buddhist traditions may change, he also knew that Buddhist truth transcends time, place and conditions.

    ***

    In our lineage, the family kitchen, children’s nursery, office or factory where we work diligently and hard, the hospital bed, volunteer activity and town hall are all our monastery and place of training. Although Nishijima taught that each of us can benefit from periods of withdrawal and silence, be it in sesshin or ango, monastic training, or a hermit’s hut in the hills, he also knew that Zen priests and Zen training can come in many fruitful forms. For those of us out in the world, priest training can be found right in the city streets, homes, workplaces and soup kitchens of this modern world, as much as behind monastery walls. The barriers of in and out are forgotten; all walls drop away.

    ***

    Nishijima was thoroughly imbued with the spirit of Dogen, was a translator of Dogen’s complete Shobogenzo into modern Japanese and (with his student Chodo Cross) into English, and felt that Master Dogen had found ways to express the Buddhist teachings rarely heard until the modern day. Nonetheless, despite his profound trust in the teachings of Dogen, I would not describe Nishijima as a prisoner of Dogen. Among the many treasured teachings of Dogen that are timeless and survive the centuries, Nishijima knew that some were primarily the views and expressions of a man living amid the society and superstitions of 13th century Japan, words aimed directly at the needs of monastics pursuing a cloistered life. Those of Dogen’s writings directed primarily to his band of monks at Eihei-ji must be placed side by side with Dogen’s other pronouncements recognizing the possibilities of Zen practice for people in all situations of life. Buddhism, and Dogen’s teachings, can be brought forth and adapted for our situations and times.

    Nishijima thought that Zen teachings could best be introduced to a Western audience via finding common ground with Western philosophy, science and modern medicine. Years before it was common to load meditators into MRI machines, Nishijima spoke of the connection of Zazen to the brain and human nervous system, influenced by then cutting-edge research on meditation by Harvard’s Dr. Herbert Benson and others. Nonetheless, some readers may find that several of Nishijima’s ideas and ways of expressing Buddhist teachings were quite personal to him, and his understanding of human physiology as a non-specialist was sometimes a bit simple in description. Even as his student, I wish to say honestly that Nishijima was not a professional philosopher nor a trained scientist. He tried to express from his own heart the sense of balance and clarity encountered in Zazen. For that reason, he frequently spoke in very creative but, perhaps, too simplified ways on Western philosophical concepts, and, as a scientific layman, about what happens in the body and brain. ... But regardless of whether or not he was completely accurate in his description of how the body functions in Zazen, Nishijima stood for and believed in the meeting and fundamental compatibility of Buddhist tenets and scientific method. Such a belief is a breath of fresh air in the often myth- and superstition-bound world of religions, including Buddhism.

    ***

    Perhaps readers will sometimes feel that Nishijima went a bit far with his model of reality. For example, Nishijima Roshi came to advocate a unique, and very personal, interpretation of the ”Four Noble Truths” (contained in this book) as an expression of his views on idealism, materialism and the rest, and some may feel that he stretched things a bit too much. It may be so sometimes. However, the fundamental points he sought to make in doing so—of Zen practice as a way to encounter the sacred in just what is, and Zazen as a means to realize the balanced and whole of this world, which often seems so out of balance and broken into pieces—should not be easily discarded. It is an important teaching.

    While never completely free of his own idealism and matters of faith, like all of us, perhaps, Nishijima Roshi nonetheless sought to present Zen practice freed of naive beliefs and superstitions, exaggerated claims and idealized myths masquerading as historical events, all of which can bury and hide the very real power of our Buddhist way in a mass of ignorance and foolishness. I, and many of his other students, join him in that task. In such ways, Gudo Wafu Nishijima helped change Zen Buddhism and continues to do so. His legacy lives on in his many students around the world and his teachings will further enrich and transform our tradition into the future.
    I miss him.

    Please let me know what you think. It is available as a print book or Kindle, although the price is the same. All royalties go to Treeleaf Sangha.

    Gassho, Jundo
    Last edited by Jundo; 02-02-2017 at 01:35 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  2. #2
    Mp
    Guest
    Wonderful Jundo! Thank you for all your efforts and making this available ... I have ordered it. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    SatToday

  3. #3
    Treeleaf Unsui / Engineer Sekishi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Virginia, USA

    In Memory of My Teacher, Gudo Wafu Nishijima Roshi ( & re-issue of his book)

    Three bows to Alan and Kirk for helping Jundo make this reprint possible.

    Three bows to Nishijima Roshi for bringing the Dharma to all of us.

    Three bows to Jundo for your efforts to get this back in print (it is in my Amazon cart now).

    Three bows to all who have lost a dear friend or loved one. "I miss him" went right through me.

    - Sekishi
    #sattoday
    Last edited by Sekishi; 01-28-2015 at 05:52 AM. Reason: mobile app edits... :-/
    sekishi
    石志

    He/him. As a novice priest-in-training, this is simply an expression of my opinion. Please take it with a grain of salt.

  4. #4
    I have ordered the paperback and await its arrival (although snail mail in my part of the world is never a speedy process!); I couldn't see a Kindle option...(?). I note also that 'To Meet the Real Dragon' is no longer available (also out of print?).

    I look forward to the Nehan-E rememberance. Particularly poignant given the proximity of the date of Nishijima Roshi's passing.

    Gassho,

    Bryson

    sat today
    Last edited by Anshu Bryson; 01-28-2015 at 06:35 AM.

  5. #5
    Thank you, Jundo (and Alan and Kirk), for making this available again. At present it is not available through Amazon.co.uk in paperback form but I hope this will change.

    Nehan-E will be a good opportunity for us all to express our gratitude to Roshi for his life and teachings.

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    #sattoday

  6. #6
    What a wonderful way to honour the Teachers, and what they have given us.
    It will be on my reading list somewhen this year.
    Thank you all.

    Gassho,
    Danny
    #sattoday

    Kokuu, it seems to be available as PB and Kindle on amazon.de.
    If the problem persists, on me, I might send it to you.
    Last edited by Jika; 01-28-2015 at 07:01 AM.

  7. #7
    Thank you, Danny. That is very kind of you. Postage should be cheaper for me from amazon.de, though, and my German might even be good enough to know what I am doing there!

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    #sattoday

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by Kokuu View Post
    Thank you, Jundo (and Alan and Kirk), for making this available again. At present it is not available through Amazon.co.uk in paperback form but I hope this will change.

    Nehan-E will be a good opportunity for us all to express our gratitude to Roshi for his life and teachings.

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    #sattoday
    It should be available in the UK in a few days. Here is the Kindle version in UK (although I must say the book, with its photos, is somehow nicer to hold than the Kindle version). The print and Kindle version should be available in the coming days on all Amazon sites worldwide, plus other online booksellers.

    http://www.amazon.co.uk/Heart-Chat-B...ds=jundo+cohen

    It is available on Kindle now, but not sure in all places of the world.

    By the way, make sure you are not ordering the 2004 version, still available in some used editions.

    There is also a listing for a version with a bad, off center cover that says "out of print". That is being pulled down.

    Gassho, J
    Last edited by Jundo; 01-28-2015 at 07:18 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  9. #9
    Just got it on my kindle and cracked it open. Very different from anything I've read about Buddhism. Also, very enjoyable to read.

    Gassho

    Sat Today

  10. #10
    Just checked; I DID order the expanded version (*wipes his brow*)! And did finally see the Kindle version but "cannot order the Kindle version in your country" Too much piracy in this neck of the woods, methinks...

    Gassho,

    Bryson

    sat today

  11. #11
    Jundo,

    With deep bows-Thank you

    Gassho

    Jiken

    sat today

  12. #12
    That is wonderful Jundo - will look forward to reading and thank you to Alan and Kirk for helping.

    Gassho

    Willow

    Sat Today

  13. #13
    Thank you. Ordered.

    Gassho
    Meishin
    Sat today
    Last edited by Meishin; 01-28-2015 at 05:15 PM.

  14. #14
    This is really a great way to honour ones teacher!
    I will definitely buy it, although I have not made up my mind whether the ebook or the printed version.
    Normally I prefer ebooks (saving trees, having it around all the time), but if there are many photos...

    Anyway, I am really looking forward to reading this!

    Deep bows to all who worked on this book.


    Gassho,

    Daitetsu

    #sat2day
    no thing needs to be added

  15. #15
    Hello everyone.

    This is a wonderful book. It's really a gift and a beautiful way to remember Nishijima Roshi.

    My take is that everyone in the Sangha should pick this up at some point and give it a careful read. Jundo's translation captures Nishijima Roshi's eloquent way of speaking, and there are many expressions of the Dharma that are completely unique to Nishijima Roshi. In my little experience, the book allowed for a deeper understanding of what Zen really is. The way other religions are presented is fascinating (others will probably recall something of this from To Meet the Real Dragon) and Nishijima's expression of the Four Noble Truths is also a fundamentally original perspective, a new way of thinking about those four truths we probably believe we know so well. There's also a good bit on how exactly Buddhism came to be along with Zen. There's some serious philosophy going on (the book isn't always easy by any stretch), but it's always tempered with real life, down-to-earth realities. The last third of the book, the section called "Zazen" and the one called "Endings" are particularly inspiring and revealing - these chapters focus heavily on practice in our "modern" world. Anyway, I don't want to say too much, so I'll stop now. Here's hoping everyone picks up a copy.

    I'm so grateful to Jundo for the opportunity to contribute just a small part. Thank you, Jundo. This experience changed me.

    Gassho,
    Alan
    sattoday
    Shōmon

  16. #16
    This is awesome! Going to pick this up.

    Gassho,

    Risho
    -sattoday

  17. #17
    Thank you, again, Alan for all your careful and diligent work, and for stepping in quickly as we worked to get it ready by the anniversary of his passing. It is worth quoting what I said in the Introduction about my stubborn failure to always follow your wise guidance ...

    Finally, I would like to thank Alan Rossi and Kirk McElhearn for their work in helping to edit this text. All remaining errors are due to my sometime failure to follow their good advice. Readers may detect a certain formal, even antiquated manner of expression in my English translation of Nishijima’s words. This is the result of my attempt to track closely the writing style and manner of expression of his original Japanese book, and to capture somewhat the elegant way in which Nishijima spoke as a man of his generation and level of reserve and politeness in the Japanese language. I also thank the many other people who have contributed to this publication in countless ways, and to all of Nishijima Roshi’s Dharma Heirs around the world.
    Gassho, Jundo

    SatToday
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  18. #18
    Hello,

    Ordered.

    Thanks to all.


    Gassho,
    Myosha sat today
    "Recognize suffering, remove suffering." - Shakyamuni Buddha when asked, "Uhm . . .what?"

  19. #19
    Treeleaf Unsui Shugen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
    Location
    Redding California USA
    How wonderful. Thank you to all involved.

    Gassho,

    Shugen

    #sattoday


    Shugen
    Meido Shugen
    明道 修眼

  20. #20
    Jundo, I hear the catch in your voice as you spoke here about Nishijima, even after this year's passing. The power of his words touched you, and thru you touches me. Thank you.

    _/\_ Shinzan
    sattoday

  21. #21
    A deepfelt thank you to all involved!
    Will read it diligently and with joy.

    Deep bows to my Teacher, my Teachers Teacher and all the other ancestors.

    Gassho
    Meikyo
    SAT TODAY!
    ~ Please remember that I am very fallible.

    Gassho
    Meikyo

  22. #22
    What a wonderful way to honour your teacher. I have downloaded it on my kindle.

    Gassho,

    Simon.

    Sat today.

  23. #23
    Congrats Jundo, and to Alan and Kirk as well.

    I bought a used copy of the original this past spring and have learned much from the teachings. What Jundo has posted above from the new introduction helps me to better understand Nishijima Roshi's teachings, particularly the importance of a Zen practice free from superstition and one which finds common ground with science.

    I believe that any religion which seeks to reach people in our present day will have to engage with the reality of science and reason. I value being part of a lineage shaped by Nishijima Roshi in these ways, and am glad that more people will now be able to read these teachings.

    Deep bows,
    Matt
    #SatToday

  24. #24
    What a beautiful way to honor your teacher. I look forward to reading it.

    Gassho,
    Meredith

    SatToday

  25. #25
    Bro. Brad once uploaded a wonderful documentary about Nishijima Roshi. It was made several years ago (I believe in 2002-03). Brad and I have each tried to contact the filmmaker, a young fellow from Portugal who since has vanished from the earth and film world! However, it is available for immediate viewing on Amazon for $2 to rent. Please rent it. I post the below merely for those who may have trouble doing so (Nishijima Roshi gave Brad and me permission years ago).

    http://www.amazon.com/Buddhist-Life-...ddhist+life%22

    Hey, I have a cameo or two in the movie. I am the bearded fellow (considerably more hair and less grey) seen about 7:30 of 'Part II' carrying a blackboard saying "REALITY/REALISM" with my other Dharma Brother Peter Rocca. That was during a retreat at our root temple in Japan, the Tokei-in (more on the Tokei-in here ... lovely photos) ...

    http://www.treeleaf.org/about-tokei-in/tokei-in-1.html

    Brad wrote about it ...

    The synopsis on that Dutch film festival's website says:

    "I live my Buddhist life from day to day, from moment to moment sometimes in my office, sometimes in my home, sometimes in a temple. In every situation there was just my Buddhist life." Gudo Wafu Nishijima was born in Yokohama, Japan. With a new and fresh approach to the Buddhist view of reality and the sense of balance to the philosophical and scientific investigations from last decades, Master Nishijima gives us the coordinates to start to understand Buddhism with our own method of thinking. He wants to pass the teachings of Buddhism to people all over the world who are searching for "Truth". "We have to say that we live in a succession of moments rather like the frames of a film." In these frames, from the present moment, the documentary is about Master Nishijima´s daily life that is all ready a Buddhist life.

    ... Watching it again I'd forgotten how good it was. It gives you a very honest look at who Nishijima Roshi was when the film was made. It shows him leading one of his annual retreats in Shizuoka for foreigners. It shows him in Europe giving talks and running a sesshin. It shows him talking to students of his from Israel and Ireland. There's also a wonderful scene of him dragging his suitcase through Tokyo Station. He always insisted on carrying his own stuff when he went on retreats. If you wanted to help him out with his bags you'd have to kind of trick him by grabbing them before he noticed. But he was always very quick.

    ... The opening scenes were shot one morning at Nishijima's dojo in Chiba prefecture. ...


    PART I


    PART II


    PART III


    Gassho, J
    Last edited by Jundo; 01-29-2015 at 02:32 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  26. #26
    Ordered!
    Thanks,
    Kaishin (開心, Open Heart)
    Please take this layman's words with a grain of salt.

  27. #27
    Look forward to reading this. to meet the real dragon is one of my favorite Zen books


    SAT today
    _/_
    Rich
    MUHYO
    無 (MU, Emptiness) and 氷 (HYO, Ice) ... Emptiness Ice ...

    https://instagram.com/notmovingmind

  28. #28
    This is wonderful Jundo. I am touch by your love for your teacher. I will take a look at the book soon


    ..sat2day•

  29. #29
    Deep bows to all sentient beings that made this book possible, most especially my teacher Jundo.

    Gassho,
    Dosho

  30. #30
    Joyo
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Sekishi View Post
    Three bows to Alan and Kirk for helping Jundo make this reprint possible.

    Three bows to Nishijima Roshi for bringing the Dharma to all of us.

    Three bows to Jundo for your efforts to get this back in print (it is in my Amazon cart now).

    Three bows to all who have lost a dear friend or loved one. "I miss him" went right through me.

    - Sekishi
    #sattoday
    I cannot say it any better than this. Your thoughts went right to my heart.

    Gassho,
    Joyo
    sat today

  31. #31
    I really enjoyed reading, To Meet the Real Dragon, this looks like a must read as well. Thanks Jundo, Alan and Kirk. I am really glad to be part of this lineage and this sangha.

    Gassho
    Ishin
    Sat Today

  32. #32
    Quote Originally Posted by Joyo View Post
    I cannot say it any better than this. Your thoughts went right to my heart.

    Gassho,
    Joyo
    sat today
    Ditto. Or would that be a thritto. In any case I agree, and look forward to the memorial. Book is ordered.

    Gassho
    Lisa
    sat today

  33. #33
    What a lovely tribute; Thank you Jundo and all

    Gassho,
    合掌 仁道 生開 - gassho, Jindo Shokai "Open to life in a benevolent way"
    日々是好日 【nichi nichi korego nichi】Every Day is a Good Day!!

  34. #34
    Great, Jundo!
    One question: Due to lack of creditcard or US bank account I can not buy from amazon.com. Is there another way for me to get this book?

    Gassho
    Vincent
    Ongen (音源) - Sound Source

  35. #35
    Just bought the kindle version.

    Gassho, Jishin, _/st\_

  36. #36
    Quote Originally Posted by Ongen View Post
    Great, Jundo!
    One question: Due to lack of creditcard or US bank account I can not buy from amazon.com. Is there another way for me to get this book?

    Gassho
    Vincent
    Hmmm. It is available through Amazon in Europe.

    http://www.amazon.nl/Heart-Buddhism-...ds=jundo+cohen

    However, I believe that they all require a credit card. Sorry, in Buddhism, we say that all things are empty and you do not actually exist ... especially if you do not have credit. Maybe someone with a credit card can buy it for you, and you could pay them back. I appreciate your interest in it. Thank you.

    Gassho, J
    Last edited by Jundo; 01-29-2015 at 03:33 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  37. #37
    Been so swept up in my own melodrama that I have not paid proper attention to this. The into makes me want to read the book. Among other things what was his unique interpretation of the 4NT ? I saw videos of him... this slight man walking along the busy street wearing a humble suit. The way he seemed to enjoy talking almost like a kid. ordering the book.

    Gassho
    Daizan
    sattoday
    Last edited by RichardH; 01-29-2015 at 04:10 PM. Reason: spell

  38. #38
    Quote Originally Posted by Daizan View Post
    Been so swept up in my own melodrama that I have not paid proper attention to this. The into makes me want to read the book. Among other things what was his unique interpretation of the 4NT ?
    Hi Daizan,

    I have written from time to time about some of Roshi's beliefs that were a bit unique to him. He was someone who sat Zazen for 70 years, encountered great Balance and Clarity in Body and Mind, and then tried to express that Balance and Clarity in western philosophical terms and medical-physiological terms that might have been, well, a little his own language and way of putting things, and sometimes an awkward fit. Although a great Zenman, I do not think he was particularly an expert in Western philosophy or medicine, but tried to describe Buddhism in such ways. My teacher, like all Zen teachers before him, has tried to express in words the experience of Zazen that is ultimately beyond words ... and to do that, Nishijima Roshi has had two very good ideas about Zazen, and his own unique way to say it.

    One is that Zazen has a medical and physiological aspect in the body, which he terms balance of the autonomic nervous system (although I always tried to convince him that there are many many physiological aspects in addition to that. Nishijima was still something of a pioneer to say that much of what we do is a physical effect of the brain and nervous system).

    The other is his idea of Zazen as a practice of "Action" or "Pure Doing/Being", and Buddhism as a "realistic" philosophy beyond idealistic religions or materialistic philosophies. Below a description in a nutshell, although it is a bit more than this. It is actually a very sound description, but he tried very hard to fit the Four Noble Truths into that. I am not sure it was a good fit. You will have to read the book to see how he tried to do that. I do not know anyone in the many flavors of Buddhism who would express them as he did. On the other hand, the POINT he was trying to make about the Four Noble Truths is itself quite good. Further, even Nishijima said he was not trying to replace the traditional view of the Four Truths, so much as add another way of viewing them.

    Some people (almost all people in some way) dream of an idealized world (or "heaven" or "enlightenment" or a "purified society after the revolution comes" ... whatever) that is always good by our little human standards ... candy cane trees and ice cream mountains. Or, they feel lack between how the world "is" and how they wish it "should be" in their ideals. At least, they dream of some state much better than the present state. In contrast, this world of ours is less than ideal. That is an "idealistic" view. There is also a sense in most religions of some "ideal" world that is the world of the spirit, which is the world we need to get to by escaping this world of the "flesh".

    On the other hand, some other people think of this universe as just blind processes, dead matter that happened to come alive as us, going no place in particular. (I really abbreviate the description ... but this is generally a materialistic view of the world). Although seemingly dispassionate and "coldly objective" about the world, this view will often cross the line into asserting that the world is "meaningless" or "pointless" or "survival-of-the-fittest cruel" or just "we are born, we work, we die" ... some such bleak thing. He also sometimes uses "material" to mean the "world of the flesh, this sometimes disappointing and hard life" as opposed to the above idealized "world of the spirit" found in most religions.

    Both those views tend to judge that there is something lacking in the present state.

    However, Buddhism is an existentialist way of being in and as this life-world-just-as-it-is, meaning the world and this life before we impose our judgments and dreams upon it. We neither judge the world lacking in comparison to another ideal world, nor do we judge it cold and pointless and hopeless. We just let the world be as it is, and we go with the flow ... to such a degree that we can no longer see perhaps the divisions between ourselves and the world in the flowing. In that way, as Nishijima describes it, it swallows whole both materialism and idealism by finding this world, just going where it goes, to be ideally just what it is. And that way of seeing beyond "beautiful" or "ugly", "peace" and "war" is .... pretty darn Beautiful and Peaceful! Material and Ideal merge into each other and are transcended. This is Nishijima's view of Buddhist "realism", his third philosophy.

    However, theory alone is not enough. More than words describing this "realistic" perspective, we must actually taste it in the practice-experience of Zazen. So, Zazen is the pure action whereby we actually experience this being of reality.

    Something like that.
    Nishijima Roshi sometimes had his own lingo, and ways of expressing the basic Zen and Mahayana worldviews.

    Gassho, J

    SatToday
    Last edited by Jundo; 01-29-2015 at 04:58 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  39. #39

    In Memory of My Teacher, Gudo Wafu Nishijima Roshi ( & re-issue of his book )

    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    Hmmm. It is available through Amazon in Europe.

    http://www.amazon.nl/Heart-Buddhism-...ds=jundo+cohen

    However, I believe that they all require a credit card. Sorry, in Buddhism, we say that all things are empty and you do not actually exist ... especially if you do not have credit. Maybe someone with a credit card can buy it for you, and you could pay them back. I appreciate your interest in it. Thank you.

    Gassho, J
    Hi Jundo,

    Myosha kindly suggested a prepaid creditcard, of which I didn't know it existed. So I should be able to buy it soon

    Thank you,

    Gassho
    Ongen


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    Ongen (音源) - Sound Source

  40. #40
    Beautiful tribute and beautiful book.

    Thank you, Jundo and a thanks to all who worked on this project.


    Gassho,

    Kyonin
    #SatToday
    Hondō Kyōnin
    奔道 協忍

  41. #41
    I was able to purchase this for my Kindle.
    Kindness, Ubasoku, Calm Poetry, I seek always to support.

  42. #42
    I'm looking forward to reading the book! Thank you so much for pouring your heart into this project Jundo and for helping with the editing process Alan and Kirk.

    I will look forward to the memorial service in Feb.

    Gassho,
    Kelly/Jinmei
    sattoday

  43. #43
    Thanks for this Jundo.
    On the way as a birthday present from me to me.
    Gassho
    Heisoku
    Sat today
    Heisoku 平 息
    Every day is a journey, and the journey itself is home. (Basho)

  44. #44
    A bow to the Buddha.
    A bow to the Dharma, with gratitude to my Teacher, and his teacher.
    A bow to the Sangha, with and from whom I continue to learn.
    Gassho!
    -Ankai

    Sat Today

  45. #45
    I cannot begin to express the joy in reading this book. So glad i ordered the paperback rather than Kindle (although if I had that would be fine too.) The photographs are quite expressive. The typeface is perfect for my aging eyes. As I read through I understand much better the lineage, understand much better what Jukai is/was about. Feel much more committed to Buddhism, and Treeleaf. Many questions dissolve.

    And from now on I will grok much more quickly what Jundo is ranting about :-) How fortunate you are to have had this wonderful man as your teacher.

    Thank you again. All who had a hand in this.

    Gassho
    Meishin
    Sat today

  46. #46
    I really enjoyed this book. I understand what you're saying Jundo about your teacher's awkwardness in certain areas. But to me, it came across as a sincerity in him to further the dialogue of Buddhism. He came across as a very real and genuine person with a real passion for Buddhist teaching and a deep commitment to help spread it honestly. It made me very grateful to have found this Sangha. I think y'all really have something special.

    Gassho

    Sat Today

  47. #47
    Quote Originally Posted by Byrne View Post
    ... But to me, it came across as a sincerity in him to further the dialogue of Buddhism. He came across as a very real and genuine person with a real passion for Buddhist teaching and a deep commitment to help spread it honestly.
    That is exactly who he is.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  48. #48
    Would it be beneficial to read "To Meet the Real Dragon" prior to this one? Unfortunately I'm not seeing it(the former) on Amazon.

    [Update] I do see it (Dragon) in paperback. Interesting when on the "A Heart to Heart Chat on Buddhism" book, if you click Gudo Nishijima, it's the only book that is listed. But if you go to the top and search, the other books come up.

    Rodney SatToday


    Last edited by Banto; 02-02-2015 at 10:03 PM. Reason: Updated info

  49. #49
    Ordered!

    Gassho,
    Dosho

    Shoveled today

  50. #50
    Hi Rodney - I read 'To Meet the Real Dragon' over the weekend as Amazon UK didn't have Jundo's new book in (But have just been able to order it now)

    I just loved the above book - and I'm now expecting that the new book is really going to be a heart to heart chat in every sense.

    It's true that Nishijima has some offbeat ways of talking about 'idealism' - I got confused at first because he doesn't always differentiate between the philosophical concept of idealism (with a big I if you like) and a much looser use of the word to describe notions, aims and ideals etc.

    As I got more into his 'thesis' - and he does seem to have one - I actually got quite excited. I can relate to his thoughts/ideas so I'm looking forward to reading more about what he has to say. One rarely reads philosophy with a heart and I just feel his has one. Maybe his thoughts won't go down in the annals of the
    history of Western philosophy meets the East but here is philosophy as 'action' - and therefore with human interest and purpose.

    What a gift,

    Gassho

    Willow

    Sat today ( maybe even caught a glimpse of the Real Dragon )

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