Results 1 to 16 of 16

Thread: Special Guest Teacher This Weekend: Jeffrey Kotyk (Prepare for Surprises!)

  1. #1

    Special Guest Teacher This Weekend: Jeffrey Kotyk (Prepare for Surprises!)

    As we are in our Jukai Season, I have asked Buddhist scholar and translator JEFFREY KOTYK, who is presently researching at Soto-shu's Komazawa University in Tokyo, to come and offer us a talk on the history and culture of the Precepts. Please give him a warm welcome! Jeff will join and speak during our monthly Zazenkai this weekend ...

    LINK HERE:
    http://www.treeleaf.org/forums/showt...ffrey-Kotyk%29

    Our MONTHLY 4-hour ZAZENKAI is netcast LIVE this Friday-Saturday at the times indicated, but is sitable and visible at the link provided at any time thereafter!

    Jeff has lived in Japan and several other places in Asia for many years, has a Masters Degree in Buddhist Studies from Komazawa University (the Soto-shu college in Tokyo) and is currently working on a Ph.D from Leiden University (in Leiden, Holland). He is presently back at Komazawa for a few months for his Ph.D. research, so I asked him to come speak with us. Besides English (he is from Winnipeg, Canada), Jeff works in and translates from Japanese, modern and classical Chinese and Sanskrit. Jeff undertook Ordination for a time with a very interesting Japanese Teacher who lives in India, but has since put that down (He is is very diverse in his Buddhist beliefs, and does not identify with any one Tradition ) A list of his many translations and projects is impressive.


    Guo Jing, "Realization through Hearing in Chan Literature" in Journal of Chinese Buddhist Studies 27 (2014), 129-179.(禪宗語錄公案中耳根圓通及其應用).
    Ishii Shūdō, "Dōgen's Views on Practice and Realization and his Dreamed Encounter with Damei Fachang" as presented at Special Session of the Society for the Study of Japanese Religions in Honolulu, Hawaii on April 2nd, 2011. To be published in Journal of Buddhist Philosophy.
    Nakamura Gyōmyō, Buddhist Tales for the Soul. New Delhi: Sterling Publishers Pvt.Ltd., 2012. (ISBN 978-81-207-6841-3)
    Nakamura Gyōmyō, Buddhist Tales in Modern Times: Stories of the Soul. New Delhi: Sterling Paperbacks, 2013. (ISBN 978-81-207-4445-5)
    Sheng Yen, Assorted Essays (學術論考 I & II). Dharma Drum Mountain. (Forthcoming).
    Sheng Yen, Commentary on the Praises of the Practices and Aspirations of Samantabhadra Bodhisattva (普賢菩薩行願讚講記). Dharma Drum Mountain. (Forthcoming).
    Sheng Yen, Essentials of Bodhisattva Precepts (菩薩戒指要). Dharma Drum Mountain. (Forthcoming)
    Sheng Yen, Living by the Monastic Precepts (). Dharma Drum Mountain. (Forthcoming)
    Sheng Yen, Master Sheng Yen's Commentary on the Sūtra in Forty-Two Sections (佛說四十二章經). Dharma Drum Mountain. (Forthcoming)
    Sheng Yen, Master Sheng Yen's Commentary on the Sūtra of the Buddha's Bequeathed Teachings (佛遺教經). Dharma Drum Mountain. (Forthcoming)
    Sheng Yen, Master Sheng Yen's Commentary on the Sūtra on the Eight Realizations of Great Beings (八大人覺經講記). Dharma Drum Mountain. (Forthcoming)
    Sheng Yen, The Essentials of Buddhist Śīla and Vinaya (戒律學綱要). Dharma Drum Mountain. (Forthcoming)
    Scholarly Contributions
    Digital Dictionary of Buddhism (www.buddhism-dict.net/ddb/)
    Content collaborator
    - 390 entries.

    CJKV-English Dictionary (www.buddhism-dict.net/dealt/)
    Content collaborator
    - 180 entries.

    2012-2013 Dharma Drum Mountain (Taipei, Taiwan)
    In-house Translator
    - Translation of Sheng Yen's work and other Buddhist related material from Mandarin Chinese into English.
    - Editing, proofreading and consultation on matters related to Buddhist Studies and translation.

    2009-2010 Geumgang University (Korea)
    Editor
    - The Formation and Transformation of Dilun Thought / 『地論思想の形成と変容』(Japanese). Tokyo, Japan: Kokusho Kankōkai, 2010. (ISBN 978-4-336-05239-1)

    http://www.hum.leiden.edu/lias/organ...an/kotykj.html
    More on Jeff can be found here, his blog where he regularly posts very insightful, but also rather realistic and iconoclastic views on Buddhist topics including the Precepts, both how they developed and how they are actually practiced ... for better and worse ... among Buddhists and Buddhist clergy in many places across Asia.

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharmadepository/

    So, I don't really know what he will say! Prepare for Surprises!


    Here is an example of the kinds of views Jeff often expresses on his blog and other personal writings, often stirring up the waters ...

    The development of a strict Vinaya [rules for Ordained person's behavior] system and organized sangha with formal ordination procedures was probably a slow process (or rather, a slow accumulation of economic, spiritual, cultural and social capitals). Even by the time the Mahāyāna emerges it was still not entirely consolidated and legitimate. ... Nevertheless, the power consolidation of the Vinaya was never absolute in India. The fact of the matter is that a lay priesthood developed early on, much to the dismay of Vinaya proponents. In a future post we will have to take a look at how such a non-monastic Buddhist priesthood existed in ancient India plus later developments on the subcontinent and elsewhere.

    At this point we might wonder where Buddhism(s) can go from here. As outlined above a lot of the original democratic ideas as the Buddha proposed them were either ignored or rendered obsolete. In foreign lands they were simply alien and consequently not implemented. However, in a modern liberal democratic country with universal suffrage, the cultural environment within which democratic principles are appreciated and respected might lend itself to more egalitarian power structures. Spiritual leadership could be decided by the vote of all members, senior and junior, rather than appointment. This already happens in many places, but then at the same time foreign power structures are either reproduced or affirmed in lands where Buddhism is still in its infancy, thus undermining any movement towards real equality (this assumes enough people want equality).

    We do not have to have appointed titles, strict hierarchies and gender inequalities in our organizations, and all things considered we might as well be better off without them if our cultural background is essentially in favour of equality. In other words what works in one culture will not necessarily be optimal in another.

    This might be an ideal, but nevertheless it could be implemented. One obstacle of course is beliefs that depend on institutional authority. One example of this is the idea of "Dharma transmission" which is an undemocratic transfer of spiritual and sometimes institutional authority from master to disciple in Zen and Chan. If the community really believes this somehow entitles the appointed leader to special privileges, exemptions and teaching rights, then egalitarian ideals will just remain ideals.

    One alternative would be to simply go back to the Buddha's original intent: be an island onto yourself and place spiritual authority into the abstract Dharma rather than individuals, in which case the right to teach and the respect that comes with being a guide would be determined based on one's knowledge and implementation of the Dharma rather than some kind of institutionalized sanctioning and/or title.

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...ty-in-buddhism
    Gassho, J
    Last edited by Jundo; 10-02-2014 at 03:14 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  2. #2
    Sounds very interesting!!!!!
    Gassho
    C

  3. #3
    Hello Jundo,

    wonderful! Thank you for organising this!

    Gassho,

    Hans Chudo Mongen

  4. #4
    Hello,

    Mr. Kotyk has fascinating research and opinions.

    Thank you.


    Gassho,
    Myosha
    "Recognize suffering, remove suffering." - Shakyamuni Buddha when asked, "Uhm . . .what?"

  5. #5
    Treeleaf Unsui / Engineer Sekishi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    I hope to see you all tomorrow. Thank you for organizing this Jundo!

    Gassho,
    Sekishi
    sekishi
    石志

    He/him. As a novice priest-in-training, this is simply an expression of my opinion. Please take it with a grain of salt.

  6. #6
    If you are attending live (and I hope we can get a pretty full house), I hope folks will ask some good questions.

    Gassho, J
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  7. #7
    Mp
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    If you are attending live (and I hope we can get a pretty full house), I hope folks will ask some good questions.

    Gassho, J
    I will try my best ... looking forward to it, thank you Jundo. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

  8. #8
    Joyo
    Guest
    I am making plans to be there live. Thank you, Jundo, for planning this.

    Gassho,
    Joyo

  9. #9
    Looking forward to hearing him speak. Should be very interesting.

  10. #10
    Jundo,

    Looking forward to it!

    Gassho,
    Dosho

  11. #11
    Hi Jundo!

    Thanks for bringing Jeffrey to the zazenkai. I'll also do my best to pay attention and ask

    Gassho,

    Kyonin
    Hondō Kyōnin
    奔道 協忍

  12. #12
    Thank you Jundo and everyone for having me at the zazenkai a few days ago.

    I would like to introduce a few articles which I wrote that might clarify some of the ideas and historical facts I was referring to.

    Firstly, about the Yogācārabhūmi Śāstra and its idea that bodhisattvas may commit otherwise negative acts in order to benefit beings or as a expedient means:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...ahayana-ethics


    So for example it says this with respect to sexual misconduct:


    “If a bodhisattva resides as a householder and there appears a woman who is clearly unbound to anyone, habituated to sexual indulgence, attracted to the bodhisattva and seeking sexual activities, the bodhisattva having seen this thinks, 'Do not make her mind upset, producing much misfortune. If she pursues her desire, she will obtain freedom. As expedient means [upaya] I will take her in and have her plant the roots for virtue, also having her abandon unwholesome karma. I will engage in impure activities [abrahma-carya] with a compassionate mind.' Even practising such defiled activities like this, there is nothing that is violated [precepts], and much merit will be produced. The renunciate bodhisattva [a monk] in order to protect the noble śrāvaka proscriptions must not destroy [their precepts]. They should not engage in any impure activities.”

    Concerning alcohol prohibition, as I mentioned the Vinaya literature does state that in fact in the early days of the sangha the monks were consuming alcohol but there was an incident and hence it was banned. See the following:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...ol-prohibition


    In ancient India the early sangha went from being poor mendicants to often living rather posh lifestyles, which results in a lot of contradictions within the literature on precepts. See the following:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...-in-the-vinaya


    Finally, as I mentioned before in China and Japan there were actually many times and places where precepts were largely ignored and not taken as seriously as they often are today in places like Taiwan. See the following:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...buddhismvinaya


    Incidentally, as a monk you're not supposed to eat garlic. If you do, you have to purify you need to quarantine yourself and smear cow dung all over the walls:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...arlic-and-dung



    If there are any questions, feel free to ask.

    -Jeffrey Kotyk

  13. #13
    Mp
    Guest
    Quote Originally Posted by Indrajala View Post
    Thank you Jundo and everyone for having me at the zazenkai a few days ago.

    I would like to introduce a few articles which I wrote that might clarify some of the ideas and historical facts I was referring to.

    Firstly, about the Yogācārabhūmi Śāstra and its idea that bodhisattvas may commit otherwise negative acts in order to benefit beings or as a expedient means:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...ahayana-ethics


    So for example it says this with respect to sexual misconduct:





    Concerning alcohol prohibition, as I mentioned the Vinaya literature does state that in fact in the early days of the sangha the monks were consuming alcohol but there was an incident and hence it was banned. See the following:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...ol-prohibition


    In ancient India the early sangha went from being poor mendicants to often living rather posh lifestyles, which results in a lot of contradictions within the literature on precepts. See the following:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...-in-the-vinaya


    Finally, as I mentioned before in China and Japan there were actually many times and places where precepts were largely ignored and not taken as seriously as they often are today in places like Taiwan. See the following:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...buddhismvinaya


    Incidentally, as a monk you're not supposed to eat garlic. If you do, you have to purify you need to quarantine yourself and smear cow dung all over the walls:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...arlic-and-dung



    If there are any questions, feel free to ask.

    -Jeffrey Kotyk
    Hello Jeffery,

    Thank you for this articles, I will be reading them over a cup of java. Also, thank you again for taking the time and leading our teaching during Zazenkai, was a wonderful talk! =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

  14. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by Indrajala View Post
    Thank you Jundo and everyone for having me at the zazenkai a few days ago.

    I would like to introduce a few articles which I wrote that might clarify some of the ideas and historical facts I was referring to.

    Firstly, about the Yogācārabhūmi Śāstra and its idea that bodhisattvas may commit otherwise negative acts in order to benefit beings or as a expedient means:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...ahayana-ethics


    So for example it says this with respect to sexual misconduct:





    Concerning alcohol prohibition, as I mentioned the Vinaya literature does state that in fact in the early days of the sangha the monks were consuming alcohol but there was an incident and hence it was banned. See the following:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...ol-prohibition


    In ancient India the early sangha went from being poor mendicants to often living rather posh lifestyles, which results in a lot of contradictions within the literature on precepts. See the following:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...-in-the-vinaya


    Finally, as I mentioned before in China and Japan there were actually many times and places where precepts were largely ignored and not taken as seriously as they often are today in places like Taiwan. See the following:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...buddhismvinaya


    Incidentally, as a monk you're not supposed to eat garlic. If you do, you have to purify you need to quarantine yourself and smear cow dung all over the walls:

    https://sites.google.com/site/dharma...arlic-and-dung



    If there are any questions, feel free to ask.

    -Jeffrey Kotyk
    I'm very glad that you decided to post these resources for us! It's very nice to put things into context.

    Deep bows,
    Steven

  15. #15
    Thank you Jeff,
    I think you really helped me to see the precepts in a much clearer light,
    Gassho
    Myoku

  16. #16
    Thank you very much Jeffrey.
    Your talk was very helpful these days that we are studying the precepts and preparing for Jukai.

    Gassho,
    Walter.
    Gassho,Walter

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •