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Jundo
03-28-2011, 06:26 AM
Dear Leafers,

Please visit out "BUDDHIST FAMILY HOLIDAYS" WEBPAGE, where we present ideas for family celebrations of some traditional Buddhist Holidays. These are ideas to involve the entire family, and especially kids as a way to introduce them to the meaning of the holidays and basic Buddhist teachings in a positive, lasting way.

MORE DETAILS HERE ... in our Forum:

http://www.treeleaf.org/forums/showthread.php?8335-VISIT-OUR-BUDDHIST-FAMILY-HOLIDAYS-WEBPAGE

http://www.treeleaf.org/forums/forumdisplay.php?74-BUDDHIST-FAMILY-HOLIDAYS-PRACTICES-WORKSHOP

Gassho, Jundo

KellyRok
09-17-2013, 02:25 PM
Hi guys,

Try this and see if it works.

https://www.sites.google.com/site/buddhistfamilyholidays/home

Gene, another member and I have been talking about Obon too. Although, I think it is typically celebrated in August...please correct me if I'm wrong. But it would be nice to celebrate a day of the dead, like dia de la muerte. I would love to hear some ideas from Jundo and others and maybe we can add Obon to the family holidays site.

Gassho,
Kelly/Jinmei

Jundo
09-17-2013, 02:38 PM
Hi Guys,

I have fixed the link, which was to our old Forum. In fact, "Buddhist Family Holidays" is one project that never took off around here. I would still like to see it do so in the future.

The idea is very simple: Children raised in Zen Buddhist or mixed Tradition households might enjoy a few simple "new and old Traditions" and activities to convey to them some of the meaning of Buddhist Teachings and Heritage. Parents may want to pass on some of the lessons and values to their kids. These holidays happen to fall very close to the Easter/Passover and Christmas/Chanukah seasons. They are not meant to replace those holidays for those who celebrate such times, so much as to add some Buddhist lessons and customs to those Seasons, and impart some Buddhist meaning to our children. They might offer Buddhist kids something to celebrate with Buddhist values, in a world of Christmas Trees and Santa Claus.

The two holidays now included are Vesak (the historical Buddha's Birthday in the Spring) and Rohatsu (the Buddha's Enlightenment Day in December).

As of now, I have not included Obon, which is primarily a time to honor the deceased Ancestors in Japan, celebrated in July and August. Just yesterday, a member of our Sangha wrote to me to ask if we might commemorate a holiday to remember the dead. There is no plan to add that at this time, but I am open to the possibility (though we really don't believe in death, by the way [scared]). Another possible holiday to consider to celebrate is the historical Buddha's "Parinirvana Day" (the non-end of his life in this world, his non-death) celebrated in February.

Frankly, despite trying to get this going, there has not been much interest around the Sangha in doing this for the kids. Some other Sangha around the US have introduced such activities with mixed success, like this example:

http://www.vzc.org/family_practice.html


I am talking to a couple of folks around here who are parents, and who might be the right person to take command to drum up support among our members to this.


However, really it all sunk like a lead balloon the last couple of years we tried to encourage it. I am hoping we might get it kick-started.

Gassho, J

Ishin
09-17-2013, 09:15 PM
Very interesting Jundo. I will be spending some time going through all this before I comment further but I would very much like to do some simple things to teach my children about what I am doing. Turn it a bit more into what WE are doing.

Gassho

C

Sekishi
09-19-2013, 01:31 AM
This is good stuff Jundo. Thank you for reviving this thread, I never would have known about it otherwise!

Just an idea that popped into my head when I saw the site - what about making a shared calendar for the site as well? Ical and/or CalDAV calendars can be "subscribed to" by multiple calendaring systems (Google Calendar, the default calendar apps on Android and iOS, desktop clients like Thunderbird, etc.). I believe that in the ical format the event description can include a link back to the site for more information (e.g. we could include basic info in the event itself, with a link to the site for activity ideas and such).

Maybe that seems like overkill for two or three holidays (there might be limited interest in such a thing as a shared calendar), but then again, maybe not. Anyhow, I would be happy to help out with such a task if there is any interest in it.

_/|\_
Eric

Jundo
09-19-2013, 01:54 AM
Thanks Eric.

I have little idea about any of this, so ask our more technical folks to look into this. I know we have a Google Calendar now ...

http://www.treeleaf.org/forums/calendar.php


Gassho, J

Joryu
09-23-2014, 03:05 PM
.....happy to see this thread.

gassho2, nandi

Anshu Bryson
09-24-2014, 04:35 AM
Apart from being a Buddhist myself, I also married into a Buddhist family (Chinese, Mahayana), so we already celebrate Buddhist holidays with family! We are lucky enough here in Indonesia to even have a Buddhist annual public holiday (Vesak/Wesak/Waisak Day)! The annual pilgrimage to Borobudur temple in Java is quite an event

http://www.fest300archive.com/userfiles/media/images/5870/large_vesak-day-procession-at-borobudur-temple-51.jpg

Gassho,

Bryson

KellyRok
09-24-2014, 04:51 PM
Bryson,

This is wonderful, thank you for sharing! Maybe you could share some of the traditions and activities that you participate in for the holidays? If you feel so inclined; I know many of us would be interested.

Gassho,
Kelly/Jinmei

Kyotai
12-01-2014, 11:35 PM
Apart from being a Buddhist myself, I also married into a Buddhist family (Chinese, Mahayana), so we already celebrate Buddhist holidays with family! We are lucky enough here in Indonesia to even have a Buddhist annual public holiday (Vesak/Wesak/Waisak Day)! The annual pilgrimage to Borobudur temple in Java is quite an event

http://www.fest300archive.com/userfiles/media/images/5870/large_vesak-day-procession-at-borobudur-temple-51.jpg

Gassho,

Bryson
A Buddhist holiday? Nice!

Bryson,

This is wonderful, thank you for sharing! Maybe you could share some of the traditions and activities that you participate in for the holidays? If you feel so inclined; I know many of us would be interested.

Gassho,
Kelly/Jinmei
I second that!

Gassho, Shawn
Sat today

Daiyo
12-02-2014, 12:58 PM
Hi all.

I am afraid I won't be able to fully attend the Treeleaf Rohatsu retreat because of several family or work appointments.
I was invited to a 3-day Rohatsu retreat in the local soto zen sangha, and couldn't either participate for the same reasons.
I'll try to sit as much as I can, but can't be sure how much.
(Sometimes I see my family and my duties as an obstacle for my formal practice, but that would be subject for another thread)

I started to feel dissapointed because of all this limitations I have to practise, but decided that perhaps this is a good opportunity to include my kids in parts of my practice.

In Argentina, the Christmas Tree is assembled and decorated on December 8th.
I read this thread:

http://www.treeleaf.org/forums/showthread.php?7978-ANNOUNCEMENT-Let-s-Make-Bodhi-Day-%28Rohatsu%29-a-Family-Event!

So I thought, the Christmas Tree (although it is a pine) could represent also the Bodhi Tree, and the star one usually places on its top could represent the morning star the Buddha saw when he became enlightened.
My kids are christian, and I do not want to influence them to choose what I did, until they are bigger and only if they want to.
But it won't hurt to share a few moments. So I will put into practice the suggestions on the page Jundo mentioned above and will share the results.
Unfortunaltely I missed the first Rohatsu night, but I think tonight I will light two candles and iclude the first night.

I'd like to find a good explanation for kids about the Noble Eightfold Path, so i will search and let you know if I find something suitable.

In the future I'd like to gather materials for kids/teens/young people to use with the scouts, but such materials in spanish are scarcely found.
So I guess I will have to translate what I find and ask some spanish speaking advanced practitioners or teachers to correct them.

Any suggestions are more than welcome, and of course I will share everything that comes out.


Gassho,
Walter.

#SatToday

Gukan
12-07-2015, 08:56 PM
What happens when you let kids loose on the Rohatsu decorations... :)

*deploys sunglasses*

31523153

Gassho
Libby

sattoday

Tai Shi
12-28-2019, 10:44 PM
I made it through the first Sitting, Zazenkai?, but as the recording will show, at the exact end of that segment of Rohatsu, I retreated to my easy chair. I only attended one lecture, Sekieshi, and his Zen approach to building a home. However, I could not promise to make the others. I did not. And I feel a bit sheepish in suggesting that I should have done more, or was I so scheduled? I'm not sure how this all fit together, all parts of that Weekend. However, as I told my wife about it, and I told friends what this all meant. Was this a celebration? I think so; to allow information to surprise some, and truly to explain to my wife why I stayed home, and she left to drive into town. This for me was a type of celebration and makes me a bit emotional and happy.
Tai Shi
sat
Gassho

Koutoku
12-26-2020, 10:59 PM
FYI only
In Taiwan the Rohatsu is celebrated on December 8th Lunar calendar. There's a sweet dessert called 臘八粥 LAba porridge or Buddha porridge we eat or gift out to commemorate this day. It is made with 8 vegetable-based ingredients mainly sweet rice, red and mug beans, jujube and others.

Gassho

Ju
SAT

Jundo
12-27-2020, 12:13 AM
FYI only
In Taiwan the Rohatsu is celebrated on December 8th Lunar calendar. There's a sweet dessert called 臘八粥 LAba porridge or Buddha porridge we eat or gift out to commemorate this day. It is made with 8 vegetable-based ingredients mainly sweet rice, red and mug beans, jujube and others.

Gassho

Ju
SAT

Thank you, Judy.

I found some information about this ... and some recipes :) (although maybe you have a better one? :p ) ...



Chinese people across the world gathered at their local Buddhist temples on Wednesday to celebrate the Laba festival by eating specially prepared congee. The festival falls on the eighth day of the 12th month of the lunar calendar—24 January this year—which, according to the Mahayana tradition, is the day the Buddha attained enlightenment.

The word Laba comes from the Chinese name for the 12th lunar month “La” (臘) and “ba” (八), the Chinese word for “eight.” On this day, Chinese people traditionally worship their ancestors, and pray for a bountiful harvest, good health, and fortune, although it was only later in its history that the festival was attributed Buddhist significance.

The festival is also known as Laba Zhu, where zhu has a similar pronunciation to zhou, which means rice porridge. However, this is not the reason why the festival is celebrated by eating congee; just before attaining enlightenment, the Buddha, who was on his last legs in terms of health, was given some curd by a shepherd girl. As Buddhism spread from India to China, the curd was replaced with rice porridge (congee) common in China.

The special rice porridge eaten on this day is known as eight-treasure congee, and usually consists of at least eight different vegetarian ingredients, including rice, beans, fruits, and nuts. The exact ingredients depend on what is grown locally or what is locally available, and therefore ties in closely with the old tradition of praying for a good harvest during the festival. Along with the glutinous rice that makes up the staple ingredient of the congee, a local community might add lotus seeds, black-eyed beans, chickpeas, Chinese mushrooms, carrots, red dates, peanuts, and yams.

The Laba festival is celebrated across China, and everyone eats Laba congee. Buddhist temples cook the congee in bulk and many make the journey to temples to collect their bowl of rice porridge. The temples also distribute free congee at construction sites, communities, hospitals, nursing homes, and welfare houses.

The festival grew in popularity during the Qing dynasty (1636–1912), when the emperor, empress, and princes would offer Laba congee to ministers, or imperial maids. As for the common people, families would get together and cook Laba congee to worship their ancestors.

The Laba festival is also considered to be part of the preparation for Chinese New Year, which follows soon afterwards. Laba therefore serves as a reminder to begin preparations for the lunar new year celebrations and for travelers to return home to reunite with their families.
https://www.buddhistdoor.net/news/chinese-buddhist-communities-celebrate-laba-festival


https://youtu.be/q8Vwt-OIo5A


https://www.buddhistdoor.net/upload/file/20180126/15907/47c6fc48aa5b95b6e2e08df79bd66b75_715__2.jpg

Hzhǎng, Chndo

STLah