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View Full Version : Buddha-Basics (Part I) — Scooby Dooby Dukkha



Jundo
09-28-2010, 02:37 PM
http://brian.hoffert.faculty.noctrl.edu/TEACHING/ItsMyDukkha.png

Were going to start a new series of 'Sit-a-Long with Jundo’s' on some fundamental Buddhist teachings — those things every Buddhist needs to know (and not know) — and maybe the most fundamental, insightful and elegant is the Buddha’s teaching of the Four Noble Truths, and Dukkha:

So, what are the 'Four Noble Truths' (the Buddha's earliest teaching)?
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Life often entails Dukkha; there is a cause for Dukkha; there is a way to the cessation of Dukkha; that way is the Noble Eightfold Path.

So, what’s “Dukkha”? …and what does Dukkha do?

No one English word captures the full depth and range of the Pali term, Dukkha. It is sometimes rendered as “suffering,” as in “life is suffering.” But perhaps it’s better expressed as “dissatisfaction,” “anxiety,” “disappointment,” “unease at perfection,” or “frustration” — terms that wonderfully convey a subtlety of meaning.

In a nutshell, your “self” wishes this world to be X, yet this world is not X. The mental state that may result to the “self” from this disparity is Dukkha.
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Shakyamuni Buddha gave many examples: sickness (when we do not wish to be sick), old age (when we long for youth), death (if we cling to life), loss of a loved one (as we cannot let go), violated expectations, the failure of happy moments to last (though we wish them to last). Even joyous moments — such as happiness and good news, treasure or pleasant times — can be a source of suffering if we cling to them, if we are attached to those things.

In ancient stories, Dukkha is often compared to a chariot’s or potter’s wheel that will not turn smoothly as it revolves. The opposite, Sukkha, is a wheel that spins smoothly and noiselessly, without resistance as it goes.

Fortunately, Shakyamuni Buddha also provided the Dukkha cure.

CLICK HERE for today’s Sit-A-Long video.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hsN1ICw-ZJA&feature=player_embedded

Remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells; a sitting time of 15 to 35 minutes is recommended.

RichardH
11-22-2011, 06:37 PM
"In a nutshell, your “self” wishes this world to be X, yet this world is not X. The mental state that may result to the “self” from this disparity is Dukkha."


Seeing and relinquishing this has been the basic practice I was taught all along in different traditions, and it has lead by and by to shikantaza as means-end. There is no other choice.





BTW there seem to be few forum members posting in this section, so I hope it is kosher to do so.

Jundo
11-23-2011, 01:22 AM
"In a nutshell, your “self” wishes this world to be X, yet this world is not X. The mental state that may result to the “self” from this disparity is Dukkha."


Seeing and relinquishing this has been the basic practice I was taught all along in different traditions, and it has lead by and by to shikantaza as means-end. There is no other choice.





BTW there seem to be few forum members posting in this section, so I hope it is kosher to do so.

Completely Kosher, and resulting in no dissatisfaction, anxiety or disappointment. 8)

Gassho, J

Jigetsu
04-30-2012, 07:28 PM
I can't believe I'm just now getting to these. Thank you so much Jundo!

Marla567
07-29-2012, 07:18 AM
Thank you very much Jundo! It was very helpful for me to sit with that.

Pleasant situations are more easy to accept and to allow, perhaps also because of this everyone tries to create pleasant situations, sometimes also in very artificial ways, like in holidays in some kind of artificial "paradies". But there never can be a real happiness, if you can't also accept the unpleasant situations, because there is no way of getting away from them...

So in pleasant situations I sometimes think: Yes, you made it, now you can accept every situation. A few weeks later (or sometimes a few hours later ;-)) I see that this was just wishful thinking. Therefore perhaps unpleasant situations can be very helpful to learn acceptance and allowing (even if it is not easy)...

Gassho
Bianca

Shingen
07-29-2012, 02:25 PM
"Just be" ... thank you for this Jundo. Funny how sometimes when studying for so long that coming back to the basics is the best teaching. :) Just like Shunryu Suzuki Roshi said, "Zen Mind, Beginners Mind".

Gassho
Michael

Jishin
10-25-2012, 01:36 AM
Jundo,

Thank you for this beautiful teaching.

Ed
01-28-2013, 01:20 PM
..always the cause vs the effect...never the right effect lasts, and the wrong result is memorable....we wish this but get that..like a broken record, on and on....even, then, getting what we want turns to smoke, vanishes like the new smell of an expensive car interior...soon it's an old car...

...the other side is awakening to this drama seeing the emptyness of it, the unsubstantiality that causes regrets, feel the evanescence...what joy, only don't hang on to joy....what releif, only don't see it as releif....like a kid wiht his hand in the cookie jar, close the lid. taste the cookie.get ready for the next act....reset..!

Thank you Jundo.

Gassho, Ed B

Genki
01-06-2014, 07:15 PM
Thank you Jundo for this teaching.

Gassho,
Björn


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ScottM
01-29-2014, 09:16 PM
Kaishin,

Since the posts are numbered, any reason you needed to have them in order?

Took me awhile to get them all marked as read. Problem? Not really. Annoying enough for me to ask why it was necessary? Yes. :)

Gassho,
Dosho

Joryu
03-26-2014, 01:04 PM
gassho2.......simple and beautiful explanation.

kidbuda
01-20-2015, 05:49 PM
beautiful explanation Jundo, thanks.

Shugen
01-24-2015, 07:22 PM
Gassho,

Shugen

#sattoday

Byokan
02-14-2015, 06:34 PM
gassho2


Gassho
Lisa
sat today

Joyo
03-24-2015, 02:23 AM
Thank you very much, Jundo. This is just what I needed today. I am so grateful for Treeleaf.

Gassho,
Joyo
sat today

Dave d
03-26-2015, 09:57 PM
Thanks jundo

Gassho
Dave sat todaygassho1

Catherine
04-28-2015, 11:18 PM
Thanks Jundo. Gave me a very meaningful interpretation of the Dharma.

Gassho
Cathy
Sat today.

Troy
06-14-2015, 11:22 PM
Gassho


..sat2day•

Theophan
06-15-2015, 01:19 AM
Jundo,
Thank you for the wonderful teaching.
Gassho
Theophan
Sat Today

Ansan
06-15-2015, 03:47 AM
Thank you, Jundo. I needed that.
Gassho,
Ansan
SatToday

Jika
07-01-2015, 04:34 PM
gassho1

Cyd
07-21-2016, 07:49 PM
Thank You Jundo
for giving more insight into this in my opinion Important Teaching.
i have a better understanding


Gossho
Cyd

Tai Shi
08-03-2016, 06:12 PM
Yes as I can read some and this is very important to me keep me informed Tai Shi std Gassho and deep bows

RisingCrow
10-26-2016, 09:40 PM
Love Jundo's take on this basic teaching that it is not the suffering so much as our resistance to it that compounds it. Nonetheless, just letting it "be" takes lots of practice! We as human beings love to analyze our situation to death & compare lour situation to everyone else's.

M.C. Easton
11-27-2016, 06:20 PM
Thank you, Jundo.

Such a beautiful reminder that the release of struggle brings peace.
Gassho,
M.C.

#sattoday

SeaChel
01-31-2017, 02:00 AM
Thanks Jundo. The lesson was a great refresher since I haven't read the four noble truths in a long while. I look forward to sitting with the rest.
Gassho
Chelsea
Sat2day


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jmiller
03-21-2017, 06:58 AM
Wonderful introduction. Thank you for the lesson.

John
Sat Today

Onkai
03-22-2017, 11:14 PM
Thank you, Jundo.

Gassho,
Onkai
SatToday

Budo-Dan
06-19-2017, 07:21 PM
Thank you Jundo! I feel like someone just lifted a huge weight off my chest! I sat today!!! 😊

Science Abbot
01-13-2019, 05:35 AM
I have been studying and living Zen Buddhism for thirty years. Today I finished the Zen for Beginner's thread and started this thread. I am learning a lot from Treeleaf. Thank you.

Gassho,
Wuyi
SatLah

Teiro
04-07-2019, 05:00 PM
Thank you for the teaching, Jundo.

No clinging, no grasping- be like water. Accept.

Gassho
Teiro

Jundo
04-07-2019, 05:47 PM
Thank you for the teaching, Jundo.

No clinging, no grasping- be like water. Accept.

Gassho
Teiro

H Teiro,

Don't forget to sit before posting, please, and to add "SatToday" to your posts. It encourages others to sit. Thank you.

Sorry to cause you "SatToday" Dukkha! :)

Gassho, Jundo

SatTodayLAH

Teiro
04-08-2019, 06:11 AM
Thank you for the reminder, Jundo! I’m sorry and I (hopefully :) ) won’t forget it next time.

Gassho
Teiro

Sat this morning

yuridayananda
04-10-2019, 06:46 PM
I just loved watching Jundo explanation. It gave some peace to hear his words. But maybe I am the bad horse here, I still have that idea of Buddhism as a pessimistic religion, because it seems like I must accept things that I shouldn´t. If the world is X and I want it to be Y, where/when/how should I act to improve it? I still resist as a bad wheel dukkha... I sincerely look for more understanding about my life and the world. Thank you very much for the teaching Mr. Jundo.

jgotthart
04-10-2019, 08:20 PM
I would say that the reason Buddhism isn't pessimistic is because it doesn't say, everything is bad and there is nothing you can do about it. It is perfectly fine to try and change a bad situation, we just have to learn to let go of the outcomes. We work to not get so attached to things so when they change we don't suffer. If you see a bad situation then work to change it. If you get too caught up in your own emotions about it then you won't suffer while trying to change these things. I probably don't make much sense, but it all basically boils down to don't get attached to things. I would also say that on one level that letting go is a version of making change.

So, an example of this from my own life is the breaking of my hot water heater. The hot water heater in my house has been dying on and off for a couple months now and we already had someone come look at it and repair it a couple months ago when it first started. So naturally when I didn't get any hot water a few days ago I was very disappointed. I could have let my anger overwhelm me and then influence my actions but instead I let it go and told my partner about it and now someone is coming to look at it. The problem can still get resolved without my needing to react to my anger and to cause suffering for myself and others.

One last example: A few years ago I was diagnosed with an anxiety disorder. Instead of becoming pessimistic and deciding that there was nothing that could be done I went on medication to help it get better. The disorder will likely never go away, instead I can learn to live in a way that is harmonious with it and continue on with my life instead of letting it bog me down and completely throwing in the towel and just giving up on life. I can continue to try and make it better while simultaneously accepting that it is there and may never change.
Anyway, I hope this helps.

Gassho
John
Sat Today

yuridayananda
04-10-2019, 10:19 PM
Mr. John, I appreciate your kind words. Please consider what I am about to say just a thought from a distance friend lost in the woods. Let go of the outcome seems like something I´ve heard before, not in Buddhism but at the investing arena. I guess that if we do our best the outcome become somehow irrelevant, because we did the right thing and have a clean conscious. Perhaps to live with no regrets is the trick to accept bad outcomes. Like a warrior who wins or die in a battle, it doesnt matter if there is victory or defeat, a smile should be always there. Maybe I am very wrong because I am a newbie here and have infinite room to improve. I didn´t go all-out when I should and now I live nightmares of regrets. Gladly I am still here and there is time to reboot everything. I am ready for a new vision. My monkey mind definitely sucks! Thank you very much Mr. John for the conversation.

Seibu
04-11-2019, 12:39 PM
Hi Yuridayananda,

This really helped me understand the point you mentioned. https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/showthread.php?14890-Sit-a-Long-with-Jundo-Zazen-for-Beginners-%286%29


Gassho
Sattoday/lah
Jack

yuridayananda
04-11-2019, 04:49 PM
Hi Yuridayananda,

This really helped me understand the point you mentioned. https://www.treeleaf.org/forums/showthread.php?14890-Sit-a-Long-with-Jundo-Zazen-for-Beginners-%286%29


Gassho
Sattoday/lah
Jack

Hello Kakedashi! Man, I think this teaching was the greatest buddhist teaching I ever received. For years I have been struggling with the idea of acceptance as resignation and passivity. But now I am beyond that, one step higher. I have not enough words to thank you for showing me that. And Mr. Jundo, he is really the man. I sincerely appreciate what you have done to me. Now I am ready more than ever to go ahead.

ChrisKiwi
02-28-2020, 12:56 AM
Sitting shikantaza the other day, I got grumpy when the doorbell rang: "Don't you know this is important...I'm trying to drop self here!"
Seems even my "zazen" can slip into grasping, not letting go.

Thank you Jundo for the clarity you bring to this teaching on dukkha.

Gassho, Chris sat/lah

SlappyPenguin
04-26-2020, 06:23 PM
Sitting shikantaza the other day, I got grumpy when the doorbell rang: "Don't you know this is important...I'm trying to drop self here!"
Seems even my "zazen" can slip into grasping, not letting go.

Thank you Jundo for the clarity you bring to this teaching on dukkha.

Gassho, Chris sat/lahI can relate to that completely, with a cat, a dog, and a toddler, it's such a great way to learn to sit with it!

I'm glad to start all of these Buddha basics, I've studied Buddhism for quite some time, but as we're all always beginners I'm excited for Jundo's take on it!

Gassho,

Joshua
SatToday/LaH

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adahee
06-23-2020, 03:53 PM
Jundo,
Thanks for your teachings. It is refreshing to go through the basics again.

Not long ago I was caught in a rainstorm. While some waited out the storm under shelter and others ran for cover, I resolved to "just be wet". I have to tell you I felt a huge amount of joy in that moment. I tried to explain that to my wife and she thought I was just playing in the rain. Maybe I was?

Gassho,
steve
st/lah