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Shoka
02-03-2021, 03:50 AM
Welcome all fiber crafters!

The Fiber Arts Guild is open to anyone who crafts with fibers, meaning we will cover the spectrum from macrame to knitting, spinning and needle work. If you do something which turns a fiber into something else, come and share with us. But we won't be including zen sewing, such as sewing rakusu, kesa, zagu, etc. those items are led in other areas.

Is it a craft or is it art? What's the difference and does it matter? This debate has come up more and more in recent years among people who take part in these past times. Recently people who used to be called crafters have begun to use the term fiber artist to describe what they do. For a long time I clung to the term crafter, because I didn't see what I was doing as an art. I was just selecting a pattern, picking yarns and making something. But then I had it pointed out to me "craft" used to refer to the thing you were trained to do as a profession. So you might be a weaver by trade, and you would craft yards and yards of the same fabric to sell. Today there are still plenty of handcrafters who sell their work, but rarely do they produce the same thing over and over. They select different patterns, different colors, different weights and textures of yarn or thread. From there they make something that is unique, which reflects something they are envisioning. In this way, the hobby is changing from a craft to an art.

What's the point of the Fiber Arts Guild?
Comradery mostly; who doesn't like to see the lovely projects others are working on, get encouragement when you have made a mistake, aren't sure about the colors, or worst of all have to frog a project after hours of work. We will also explore what fiber arts have to do with zen. Can we maintain a mind of samu while working? Can giving handmade gifts be the many hands of Kannon? We talk about these in the future.

What are the rules? Be kind, and encouraging. And please leave the "rules" at the door. If someone doesn't want to pre-wash and iron all their fabric before starting a quilt that's their business (p.s. that is totally me 😁).

So join us, pull up a chair, bench or stool and introduce yourself!

Share what fiber arts you currently practice, when you learned them and why you keep doing them. Also consider sharing your current work in progress.

Gassho,
Shoka
sattoday

Kokuu
02-03-2021, 05:26 PM
Oh, this is wonderful, Shoka! How great for all of us who work with textiles.

I currently practice knitting and sewing, mostly sashiko. I learned knitting around a decade or more ago and enjoy making hats, scarves and other items for family and friends.

Sashiko I only learned a year or so ago. I believe it was something suggested to me by Meitou. I most make cushions but am about to start a wall hanging in indigo. Sashiko practice is for me, very meditative and I greatly enjoying the repetitive aspect of creation which is very similar to rakusu sewing.

This was the last project I had which is a cushion in the scattered hemp leaf (tobi asanoha) pattern. Fabric is 100% cotton kofu tsumugi

https://postimg.cc/t7thGGB5

Gassho
Kokuu
-sattoday-

Shoka
02-03-2021, 10:32 PM
Oh, this is wonderful, Shoka! How great for all of us who work with textiles.

I currently practice knitting and sewing, mostly sashiko. I learned knitting around a decade or more ago and enjoy making hats, scarves and other items for family and friends.

Sashiko I only learned a year or so ago. I believe it was something suggested to me by Meitou. I most make cushions but am about to start a wall hanging in indigo. Sashiko practice is for me, very meditative and I greatly enjoying the repetitive aspect of creation which is very similar to rakusu sewing.

This was the last project I had which is a cushion in the scattered hemp leaf (tobi asanoha) pattern. Fabric is 100% cotton kofu tsumugi

https://postimg.cc/t7thGGB5

Gassho
Kokuu
-sattoday-

Wow Kokuu! Your stitch work is beautiful.

Gassho,
Shoka
sat

Jundo
02-04-2021, 01:45 AM
In Japan, some folks knit for statues including Jizo, to keep him (and the remembered children he represents) warm in winter ...

https://japanjourneys.jp/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/HatsMiyajima2-1024x681.jpg

There was also a contest a few years ago, sponsored by a TV station, to knit a giant muffler for the Giant Buddha of Ushiku, in the town next to Treeleaf Tsukuba. They actually placed it on the Buddha for a time. A little bit of the scarf is shown here ...

https://seespo-ibaraki.jp/wp-content/uploads/2020/08/daibutsu-037.jpghttps://stat.ameba.jp/user_images/20090709/22/mikepon2/c3/09/j/t01760243_0176024310210641279.jpg?caw=800

Gassho, J

STLah

Kokuu
02-04-2021, 01:33 PM
I love those pictures of Jizo, Jundo!

My daughter gave me a ceramic Jizo for my last birthday and I knitted him a wee sort of cowl/bib, although with his prayer hands it was difficult to position this to the front: https://postimg.cc/tnFYtSbq

Gassho
Kokuu
-sattoday-

Hensho
02-05-2021, 08:19 PM
Love that we started this part of the Arts circle. Thank you, Shoka, for taking it on. It's good to have a space that's absolutely different from Ravelry.

Kokuu, I had never heard of sashiko before: your piece is stunning. There's something to be said for clean, geometric lines. So lovely. Please keep sharing your work: I want to see more!!

I am a "sheep to shawl" fiber craftsperson. I have a fiber studio where I work mostly with long wool breeds, turning their beautiful wool into yarn and then mostly into handknit sweaters. I also dabble with pin looms, embroidery, and needlepoint. Back in the day, I used to blog about the fiber crafts.

My take on the craft / maker / artist / artisan thing keeps changing. I used to take a curmudgeonly stance, essentially, that the difference between craft and art is that craft is involved in utility. For example, I consider spinning a craft because it creates yarn, which is not the end goal. Yarn possesses utility because it's the supply or practical material to the end goal: the sweater. The sweater is also craft because it also has a practical application: to keep warm. It may also be beautiful, but that is it's secondary raison d'etre. However, if I use the yarn to make a wall hanging, the wall hanging is art--not craft--because it's primary purpose is art. It may also be political or serve to take up wall space, but these are not its primary purpose.

Anyway, that was my original position: https://frenzyknits.com/2012/05/29/example-1/. I'm not sure I believe it any more.

Gassho,
Hensho

satlah

Shoka
02-08-2021, 05:48 PM
I am a "sheep to shawl" fiber craftsperson. I have a fiber studio where I work mostly with long wool breeds, turning their beautiful wool into yarn and then mostly into handknit sweaters. I also dabble with pin looms, embroidery, and needlepoint. Back in the day, I used to blog about the fiber crafts.


Hensho,

Doing sheep to shawl is amazing! My family is sure it won't be too much longer until I have sheep or something. There is an alpaca farm near my dad's that was I hoping would let me buy a fleece, but they have closed during the pandemic... so I have to wait another season. Some day soon.

I have never knit a sweater, but it's on my list for this year. But first I have to dye and sample with spinning to get the yarn right, then spin then knit. Because I find it more fun when I do more of the steps. The silly sweater will probably have 20 or more hours of work before I even start working towards the final project.

I always joke with people that if I "need" a beanie (scarf or other item) I buy it, because I take way to long in the making process. I make things that I find interesting to produce and then find them loving homes.

Gassho,
Shoka
sat

Shoka
02-08-2021, 06:42 PM
Hey everyone,

I figured I should share about my own fiber experience and background. I learned to crochet before I was in kindergarten. During 4th or 5th grade I joined a knitting club where one of the teachers taught us to knit during lunch. I still do both today. I also dabbled in cross stitch and embroidery, which never really stuck. At one point when I was in elementary school we had a pioneer day or something like that, and there was a lady with a spinning wheel. I watched her forever... I mean I remember nothing else from that day. I wanted to do that so bad (yeah I was a weird kid). Then a few years later when visiting a little coastal tourist town I saw a woman spinning outside a store and drug my entire family to go see, then I went inside the shop and say a full size weaving loom. I spent forever (according to my siblings) asking questions and seeing how it worked. That day I took home a small kids loom, and really did enjoy it. But since I was a kid, without a teacher or youtube to help explain what to do, I never was able to get another project going after I finished the first sample... at some point the loom went missing or got thrown out during a move.

About 5 years ago, I was able to get a spinning wheel and that has been an awesome adventure. Last year for my birthday I got a rigid loom and with the help of youtube and some great facebook groups was able to warp the loom and start weaving. Last year I also took up dying yarn and roving.

Last year I spent so much time making things... Below are pictures of a few things.





Gassho,
Shoka
sat
https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20210208/66396a906f5e5f5758c61568c197ab98.jpg

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20210208/9fc79df3f0f8515cde8553eae8a2a631.jpg

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20210208/7dcabaedfd6bb2a9371d78a9985cd2a1.jpg

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20210208/cefed2714d11e96f3946ac932ab74a35.jpg

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20210208/18ab501524ab3286569eb46a6254b8e7.jpg

https://uploads.tapatalk-cdn.com/20210208/1941c39f920c153a6119a17d6d24bc67.jpg

Jinyo
02-22-2021, 10:36 AM
Shoka, your work is beautiful - very impressed. (Like your feline helper too!)
I love textiles and do a little dry needle felting and slow stitch.
Thanks for sharing,
Jinyo