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Tai Shi
11-24-2015, 08:12 PM
I work in the senior coffee shop for free, I teach creative writing for free, I call disabled folks who need a pick me up, and I give talks on recovery from mental illness (NAMI).

Elgwyn
sat today
Gassho _/|\_

Shugen
11-24-2015, 08:18 PM
I work in the senior coffee shop for free, I teach creative writing for free, I call disabled folks who need a pick me up, and I give talks on recovery from mental illness (NAMI).

Elgwyn
sat today
Gassho _/|\_

Thank you for your efforts! There is a lot that can be done all around us.

Gassho,

Shugen

#sattoday


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Rich
11-24-2015, 08:30 PM
We are very grateful for all that you do.

May you experience peace and joy.

SAT today

Shingen
11-24-2015, 09:13 PM
This is wonderful work Elgwyn, thank you for your practice. =)

Gassho
Shingen

#sattoday

Myosha
11-24-2015, 10:55 PM
Hello,

Great example of work in action! Shames my sorry butt.^^


Gassho
Myosha Sat today

Jakuden
11-24-2015, 11:00 PM
Wow that is truly wonderful Elgwyn, deep bows for your devotion to other beings. gassho1 Sounds like you are living your practice every moment!

Gassho,
Sierra
SatToday

Doshin
11-24-2015, 11:36 PM
Elgwyn, thank you for making the world better.

Gassho

Randy
sattoday

Jundo
11-25-2015, 01:46 AM
Lovely.

Gassho, Jundo

SatToday

ScottM
11-25-2015, 01:57 AM
Wonderful! :)

Gassho,
Dosho

Sat Today

Jishin
11-25-2015, 02:21 AM
http://xuanfa.net/buddha-dharma/concepts-principles/karma/bodhidharma-on-no-merit/

In the sixth century, the Chinese Emperor Liang invited the Indian monk Bodhidharma to his capital in Nanjing. The emperor was very fond of Buddhism and often wore Buddhist garments and recited Buddhist prayers. He was, however, most proud of his unbending and unqualified support for Buddhism throughout his entire kingdom. Proud of his knowledge and the contributions towards Buddhism, he asked Bodhidharma, “Since I came to the throne, I have built many temples, published numerous scriptures and supported countless monks and nuns. How great is the merit in all these?”

“No merit whatsoever” was his shocking reply. “You have gained no merit. What you have done produces only worldly rewards, that is, good fortune, great power, or great wealth in your future lives, but you will still be wandering around in samsara.”

Now, the emperor thought, he had often heard teachings from renowned masters who said, “Do good, and you will receive good; do bad and you will receive bad. The Law of Cause and Effect is unchangeable, effects follow causes as shadows follow figures.” But now, this sage declared that he had earned no merit at all. Thus, the emperor was thoroughly perplexed.

The emperor had failed to understand Bodhidharma’s words which mean that one is not really practicing the Buddha-dharma if one does good with the desire to gain merit for oneself. It will be more like satisfying one’s own ego, or promoting one’s own welfare, or even for the sake of being recognized and appreciated by the public. One can gain worldly fortune in this manner, but that is not the goal of a Buddhist. The goal is to get out of samsara–to become liberated and thus escape the suffering that is inherent in worldly existence. You must not forget the purpose of practice. Generosity without correct view is not correct practice. Only when one is generous without any attachment to the self (the giver), the gift, or the recepient of the gift is it true cultivation.

Gasho, Jishin, _/st\_

Jundo
11-25-2015, 03:56 AM
http://xuanfa.net/buddha-dharma/concepts-principles/karma/bodhidharma-on-no-merit/

In the sixth century, the Chinese Emperor Liang invited the Indian monk Bodhidharma to his capital in Nanjing. The emperor was very fond of Buddhism and often wore Buddhist garments and recited Buddhist prayers. He was, however, most proud of his unbending and unqualified support for Buddhism throughout his entire kingdom. Proud of his knowledge and the contributions towards Buddhism, he asked Bodhidharma, “Since I came to the throne, I have built many temples, published numerous scriptures and supported countless monks and nuns. How great is the merit in all these?”

“No merit whatsoever” was his shocking reply. “You have gained no merit. What you have done produces only worldly rewards, that is, good fortune, great power, or great wealth in your future lives, but you will still be wandering around in samsara.”

Now, the emperor thought, he had often heard teachings from renowned masters who said, “Do good, and you will receive good; do bad and you will receive bad. The Law of Cause and Effect is unchangeable, effects follow causes as shadows follow figures.” But now, this sage declared that he had earned no merit at all. Thus, the emperor was thoroughly perplexed.

The emperor had failed to understand Bodhidharma’s words which mean that one is not really practicing the Buddha-dharma if one does good with the desire to gain merit for oneself. It will be more like satisfying one’s own ego, or promoting one’s own welfare, or even for the sake of being recognized and appreciated by the public. One can gain worldly fortune in this manner, but that is not the goal of a Buddhist. The goal is to get out of samsara–to become liberated and thus escape the suffering that is inherent in worldly existence. You must not forget the purpose of practice. Generosity without correct view is not correct practice. Only when one is generous without any attachment to the self (the giver), the gift, or the recepient of the gift is it true cultivation.

Gasho, Jishin, _/st\_

This is so true. There is no giver, receiver nor gift. All is given selflessly.

But yet we must not fail to be of service to others, to leave this world a bit better.

And, if ya ask me, no harm in taking a bit of personal pleasure in bringing good to others too. One can be a bit of a stick in the mud and fuddy duddy about being "selfless" in bringing a smile to others ... which may be why old Bodhidharma is typically shown looking like this ...


https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/_KUoSr4MaYqGYC2VBEmRM69eSPfVA6D_2WaNtpNbQ3wbP7I-1JOUjxhQwuXrIjWJWQfBTSnft3HLAPjKtYOYI9gJ8Q88uRLnNf WfGwd75rzzZnrNcWHBtAAliWztD6eXzuwqWbASS2VsBIEd__ez aGzR_xHv_SsL9F0gq-yhWf2Fz8DU3EOel1LE_vLuLAn2aezs0y0iD0jZmxmLnTHCNaOf qvRkLsktW_q7h7RWV9IpmnZ2lWkMlud8UnuinsIl9Ar8O5bkH_ cNYgh7UfuaUYstAq3wbGFVSp89_WJCDtY4JNhe4zYjiHrWNTQO DV_WRKRPOtByoZnB1Bixs_h6kJx-Zk-OgsnrN_Wt3N5NdOP3xZgwn0OVvvB-Orsl0-Ec5C-ONgz8_JVzSQvNwOX_rjK7XTOiW7eN5av8DeBCW6BsldUBGMbNg SdIj6CtgSucCcXSGGy2BkgwYfZkOovnbdIHZhiJLp0U9lNg0fF BpNEU4W1z-Qj7ZZn4kT1BjVTi0qVoYmRO4tKpaAmaXXQT5Bv-yij7aVPWtqRpuABEUHU=w390-h660-no

I think that Bodhidharma also knew how to smile sometimes, and take joy in doing good.


https://lh3.googleusercontent.com/fjN-jFjJR5z418b90j1cf5F8wBsCaYa6gY44hVpSR5hAxxIFN-s8K8hES_hWaPokNaaJO4ggQjwn8KBnLch48G26XeiqrFgf42PP KmORj2vg9BF7Sxh7uX64KhV27n6JQ8i0qeo4nQno035CM9u7bn b1CWGLWwoSrxw1x7HCGU6kueSVAdd1i1Hd7uB_LeOCt0V327rg pggIk1bksDzywqJYzlzPGQIgQ3bqVZ5hXjC3XEZWcYlLVKlx8m dPBev8LHnLwY0lUJpRSk5U9_lo0EHQcl381674um_sh_ofUdm2 AZRQKcpj0s7zREWBCWiamZfw84aiybxso-0nU8v76kEflmiDY5vUnaRdFPHNjnooYV6ksS5TLLgCLIJwUWgu 55KpQR4zcRXGo6QRotW10cF_i8NluIb3eTcakI4rncyy5k4S5Y 0uzZuNzM8-OEhOAaedh7KrPZFcuiAgNevzYQAFX4AnGbNKa8KvFAGRYCLqeC 1G74t0Jolhm4hNPto8qM4FEuAsb1cFNbuFf3kVAzA8e8akk-NBCtUTX0FpqZ0=w390-h660-no

In the "Dana Sutta" (Sutta on Giving and Generosity), a noble giver is said to be "one who is happy before, during and after giving ... Before giving he is happy anticipating the opportunity to exercise his generosity. While giving he is happy that he is making another happy by fulfilling a need. After giving he is satisfied that he has done a good deed."

http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipitaka/an/an06/an06.037.than.html

We neither are attached to feeling good about ourselfs for doing good, neither need we fail to smile and feel joy at doing good.

Gassho, J

SatToday

Jika
11-25-2015, 09:00 AM
Thank you, Elgwyn, for the things you do to make things better.

And thank you Jishin and Jundo for the descussion and teaching following.

Especially at this time of year, when one is (I'm always late) getting presents for others, thinking who would be suprprised and happy if St. Niclas (who comes on 12/06 here) brought them some sweets, like my neighbours, who often offer help, and has a idea for Christmas that makes oneself smile, I have been wondering if I am "allowed " to do so.

To feel this happiness, imagine this happiness (of which I cannot be sure). But I would be missing it, giving a gift without emotion would be really strange.

I do not think it is the amount of things or the size of a present that counts.
I used to know an old lady who was very poor. Her daughter supported her, and as the daughter worked in a porduction facility for calenders, she was officily allowed to take some of last years unsold big picture calenders home. The old lady made beautiful giftbags out of them, according to the oscassion she had bags for spring, for winter, with childrens motives... Whenever someone in the family or neighbourhood wanted to wrap something, they came to her, and she gave them for free. There must have been great joy in her making those bags, imagining the way they would travel, always carrying something good.

Gassho,
Danny
#sattoday

Tai Shi
11-25-2015, 03:08 PM
Thank you Jundo. I have in my younger life been tortured by the fear of death, and yet embraced it. Now I embrace life?

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