October 2009 Archives

Construction has begun on converting an old wooden building at Treeleaf in Tsukuba into a hall for sitting Zazen.

I cannot post a sitting today, so offer this short tribute to the carpenter (Mr. Aita) and architect (Mr. Ushioda), good friends, who have been working on the place each day. They also need to do a lot of reinforcement to the building itself, which is old and not in the best shape. Here, they are building a few of the tan (platforms covered with tatami mats used for sitting in Japan). The space is small, but should let about 30 people sit at one time.

It is not much more than planks and sawdust now, not much to see, and will take many more weeks until the work is finished. But I hope to be able to show everyone, and be ready to sit, by the end of the year.

Deep bows of gratitude to Mr. Aita and Mr. Ushioda.

________________________



(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)


Making Merit, Making Bows

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( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XIX)


.... all things intra-penetrating  ... 


We receive aid and support from others, we give to others, we bow in gratitude.


_____________________________

When a patron comes into the monastery and donates money to hold a feast, the various stewards should all be consulted; this is the precedent established in monasteries of old. With regard to the distribution of the merit-making donations, they also consult together. Do not create a disturbance in the hierarchy by infringing on anyone's authority.

When the midday meal or morning gruel has been properly prepared and placed on the table, the cook dons his kesa, spreads his sitting cloth, faces the sangha hall [where the monks eat], burns incense and makes nine prostrations. Upon finishing his prostrations, he sends the food [to the sangha hall]

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen - Translated by Griffith Foulk




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)

Guishan or the Buffalo?

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( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XVIII)


The ordinary is the most wondrous, all things intra-penetrating yet just as they are ...

Dosho Port (on his blog, wild fox zen) has a wonderful rephrase of the reference to Luling rice ...

A monk asked, what is the ultimate meaning of the buddhadharma?
The master [Qingyuan] said, "What is the price of Luling rice?"

Or in contemporary terms, "What's the ultimate meaning of the buddhadharma?"
"What's the Dow at today?"

Maybe the ultimate isn't so far from the business of taking care of business

Daido Loori, who left this visible world this week, has this to say about Master Guishan ...

Guishan, [the famous 9th century master, was earlier the cook in a monastery. His then Master] Baizhang placed a pitcher of water in the middle of the room and said, "If you call this a pitcher, you're caught up in words and ideas. If you don't call it a pitcher, you negate the fact. What will you call it?" The head monastic said, "It can't be called a pair of wooden sandals." Guishan just kicked over the pitcher. Baizhang appointed Guishan as abbot of the new monastery.

In Guishan's own teaching, one of his favorite koans was: "A hundred years from now, I will be reborn as a buffalo at the front gate of this monastery. On the side of that buffalo will be written 'Monastic Guishan such and such.' If you call it a buffalo, it's Monastic Guishan. If you call it Monastic Guishan, it's a buffalo. What will you call it?" Again, the dualities. If you call it a pitcher, you miss it. If you say it's not a pitcher, you miss it. If you call it a buffalo, you miss it. If you say it's not, you miss it. Our tendency is always to be caught on one side or the other. How do we go beyond those dualities?


Anzan Hoshin of the White Wind Zen Community continues ...

So at that moment, is it Guishan or is it a water buffalo? The water buffalo looks at Guishan; Guishan looks at the water buffalo. There is complete mutuality when the tenzo brings in the rice, serves the monks, he sees the water buffalo, he sees Guishan. When the monks look at the tenzo they see the water buffalo and they see Guishan. The monks see the monk. Mutuality sees mutuality in the rice.


Ah, who says the ordinary is just ordinary?

_____________________________

Now carefully calculate: for every grain of rice to be eaten, one grain must be supplied. If a single grain of rice is divided, then you will have two half-grains of rice. Three tenths, four tenths; one half, two halves. If you supply two half-grains of rice, you will make a single whole grain. [You must be able to see clearly how much of a surplus will be created if you add one unit of rice, or whether there will be enough if you take away one unit].

Getting to eat a single grain of Luling rice enables one to see the monk Guishan; getting to supply a single grain of Luling rice enables one to see the water buffalo [that Guishan will become]. The water buffalo eats the monk Guishan, and the monk Guishan feeds the buffalo. Is my measurement complete or not? Is your calculation complete or not? If you carefully inspect and exhaustively check [these matters], your understanding will dawn and become clear. Then, [when you understand these details be prepared to explain them to others according to their capacity to understand. Use ingenuity in your practice; see the buffalo and Guishan as one, not as two, even though temporarily they appear that way. In your day-to-day life, do not forget this even for a moment].


From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen - Translated by Griffith Foulk [with portion from Uchiyama]




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)
( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XVII)


This section always reminds me of the old child's riddle:

How do you divide equally 16 apples among 17 people??

Answer:  MAKE APPLESAUCE !!


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When you return to your quarters, right away you should close your eyes and clearly envision the number of individual places in the [sangha] hall; the number of monks in the individual quarters of retired minor officers, retired senior officers, and the like; how many individual monks there are in the infirmary, geriatric quarters, temporary quarters, and so on; the number of wandering monks registered in the guest quarters; and the number of people in subtemples. After carefully calculating in this way, if you have the slightest uncertainty, ask the hall manager in question, or the quarters prefect, quarters chief, or quarters head seat of the various quarters and eliminate your doubts.

Now carefully calculate: for every grain of rice to be eaten, one grain must be supplied. If a single grain of rice is divided, then you will have two half-grains of rice. Three tenths, four tenths; one half, two halves. If you supply two half-grains of rice, you will make a single whole grain. [You must be able to see clearly how much of a surplus will be created if you add one unit of rice, or whether there will be enough if you take away one unit].

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen - Translated by Griffith Foulk [with portion from Uchiyama]




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)


The subject of the nature of a teacher and the teachings has been discussed on our Treeleaf Forum recently ...






(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)

Sitting With The World

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My old buddy from Florida, Sid, sent me the following ... so much of the same cut as Shikantaza,   ... so beautifully stated ...

A few of the subtle points of Buddhist philosophy and Master Dogen aside, it is a lovely description of basic "Just Sitting".

It would be good to read it a few times and take it to heart. Here is the main part ...


Sitting With The World

Take a seat ...and just sit. .... Relax.  Don't try to do anything at all.  Don't try to make anything
come, don't try to make anything go leave.  Let everything do its own
work, chart its own course.

As you sit, just sit with the world, with whatever is there, all of the
arisings and passings away in your mind, body, and environment.  As you
notice sights and sounds, thoughts and feelings, memories and
anticipations, relax into them.  Relax your mind and body.  Actively do
nothing.  Make no efforts.  Just sit, just be, at least for now.

Let go of all of the things that frantically direct your day-to-day
existence: me, him, her, past, future, plans, desires, aversions, hopes,
goals, concerns, anticipations, fears, everything.  Don't grasp at
any of these things, don't resist any of them.  Just sit with
whatever is there.  Things naturally settle this way, and the mind comes
to peace.

The mentality is this.  There is nowhere that you need to go, nothing
that you need to achieve, no one that you need to be.  Those ideas are
illusions, fabrications of the mind.  You are complete and whole where
you are, just sitting with the world. ...

____________________________________


(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)

Up & Down Tsukuba-San

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I climbed from the bottom to the top of Mount Tsukuba, the famous mountain near Treeleaf (in Tsukuba, Japan) ... sat some Zazen ... then climbed back down again ...

A little custom of mine, a climb to no where step by step ... Zazen to no where step by step ... the scenery always changing.

I wanted to sit with everyone up there, but the camera broke. So, we will look back at a sitting recorded when Hans, one of the mountains of our Sangha, came to visit from Germany last year.

Mt. Tsukuba. It is one of Japan's 'Great Mountains' ...
You can read all about "Tsukuba-san" here:


So, please sit with Hans and me next to a really grand 'ol ancient rock



Not That Side, Not This Side

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( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XVI)

A chant heard daily in Zen temples is the "Sandokai", the "Merging of Relative and Absolute", by Sekito Kisen, the 8th Zen Ancestor in China.

It includes images such as these, speaking of the "light" and the "dark" ... conveying the relationship of this world of "relative" things in which you and I live and the absolute realm (no things, no you, no I apart) ...

They are "not one, not two", meaning neither the same, yet intimately not different at all ...


Light is also darkness,
But do not move with it as darkness.
Darkness is light: Do not see it as light.
Light and darkness are not one, not two,
Like the foot before and the foot behind in walking.
Each thing has its own being,
Which is not different from its place and function.
The relative fits the absolute as a box and its lid.
The absolute meets the relative
Like two arrow points that touch high in the air.
Hearing this, simply perceive the Source!
Make no criterion!
If you do not see the Way,
You do not see It even as you walk on It.


_____________________________

Harmonizing and purifying yourself in this manner, do not lose either the one eye [of transcendent wisdom] or the two eyes [of discriminating consciousness]. Lifting a single piece of vegetable, make [yourself into] a six-foot body [i.e. a buddha] and ask that six-foot body to prepare a single piece of vegetable. Those are [the cook's] spiritual penetrations and magical transformations, his buddha-work and benefiting of living beings.

Having prepared [everything] so that the preparations are finished, and cooked [everything] so that the cooking is done, look to "that side" and put things away on "this side". ** When the drum sounds or the bell rings, join the assembly [of monks in training] and attend the convocation [to hear the abbot's teachings]. "Morning and evening, seek and attend", without being remiss even once.

** [NOTE from Prof. Foulk: A double-entendre. On the literal level, the meaning is simply that the cook should look all around and put things away where they belong. Figuratively, he is advised to look "there" (nahen -- the realm of the highest truth), while putting things to rest "here" (shahen -- the wordly realm)].

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen - Translated by Griffith Foulk




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)
( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XV)


Uchiyama Roshi translates this section in a very nice way ...

It is vital that we clarify and harmonize our lives with our work, and not lose sight of either the absolute or the practical. Handle even a single leaf of a green in such a way that it manifests the body of the Buddha. This in turn allows the Buddha to manifest through the leaf.

_____________________________

Harmonizing and purifying yourself in this manner, do not lose either the one eye [of transcendent wisdom] or the two eyes [of discriminating consciousness]. Lifting a single piece of vegetable, make [yourself into] a six-foot body [i.e. a buddha] and ask that six-foot body to prepare a single piece of vegetable. Those are [the cook's] spiritual penetrations and magical transformations, his buddha-work and benefiting of living beings.

Having prepared [everything] so that the preparations are finished, and cooked [everything] so that the cooking is done, look to "that side" and put things away on "this side". ** When the drum sounds or the bell rings, join the assembly [of monks in training] and attend the convocation [to hear the abbot's teachings]. "Morning and evening, seek and attend", without being remiss even once.

** [NOTE: A double-entendre. On the literal level, the meaning is simply that the cook should look all around and put things away where they belong. Figuratively, he is advised to look "there" (nahen -- the realm of the highest truth), while putting things to rest "here" (shahen -- the wordly realm)].

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen - Translated by Griffith Foulk




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)


When Dogen was in China, he heard this verse that we are all still chanting as we are about to put the Kesa on. 




Vast is the robe of liberation 

formless robe, field of happiness. 

I wear the Tathagatha's teaching 

Liberating all sentient beings. 

 

Dai sai ge dap pu ku, 

Mu so fu ku den e 

Hi bu nyo rai kyo 

Ko do sho shu jo






(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)

Anxiety

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I have been watching your video's on Treeleaf Zendo for a few months. I really enjoy it, I see things with many different points of view, and keep the things you say in your videos in my mind as I go through each new day. I have an Anxiety issue, which results in me panicking because I get the feeling that I cannot breathe well most of the time. I have had this for a few years. I just wanted to know if you could possibly make a video one day that can help me have a different attitude in those situations instead of being negative and beginning to panic. If you have ever the time for that, It would be greatly appreciated.


Thank you. It is a question that touches many people.

(by the way, if anyone else would like to suggest a topic or make a comment, feel free to write any time)






(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)

... life ... death ...

... showing front, back ... the falling maple leaf ...







(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)

Turn around the light to shine within ...

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( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XIV)


In another great early work, Fukanzazengi, Dogen writes ...

Put aside the intellectual practice of investigating words and chasing phrases, and learn to take the backward step that turns the light and shines it inward. Body and mind of themselves will drop away, and your original face will manifest.

This classic line harken's back to an image of Zazen by the eighth Zen ancestor in China, Sekito Kisen (8th century), in his Song of the Grass Roof Hermitage ...

Turn around the light to shine within, then just return.
The vast inconceivable source can't be faced or turned away from.

Dogen scholar and Soto Priest, Taigen Dan Leighton, offers this perspective ...

[Sekito writes], "Turn around the light to shine within, then just return. . . . Let go of hundreds of years and relax completely. Open your hands and walk, innocent." According to [Sekito], the fundamental orientation of turning within, also later described by Hongzhi and Dogen, is simply in order to return to the world, and to our original quality. Letting go of conditioning while steeped in completely relaxed awareness, one is able to act effectively, innocent of grasping and attachments. So the context of this just sitting suggested by [Sekito] is the possibility of aware and responsive presence that is simple, open-hearted, and straightforward.

_____________________________

That you still do not grasp the certainty of this principle is because your thinking scatters, like wild horses, and your emotions run wild, like monkeys in a forest. If you can make those monkeys and horses, just once, take the backward step that turns the light and shines it inward, then naturally you will be completely integrated. This is the means by which we, who are [ordinarily] set into motion by things, become able to set things into motion.

Harmonizing and purifying yourself in this manner, do not lose either the one eye [of transcendent wisdom] or the two eyes [of discriminating consciousness]. Lifting a single piece of vegetable, make [yourself into] a six-foot body [i.e. a buddha] and ask that six-foot body to prepare a single piece of vegetable. Those are [the cook's] spiritual penetrations and magical transformations, his buddha-work and benefiting of living beings.

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen - Translated by Griffith Foulk




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)

Wild Horses and Jumping Monkeys

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( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XIII)


Like wild horses and crazy monkeys.


I am going to spend a couple of days with this passage ...  taming those horses, calming those monkeys ...

(You will hear and see our wild house cat, Tin Tin, scampering around the room during much of today's sitting)


ps- Rev. Taigu was not able to get on yesterday, but I hope he will be able to join us later this week

_____________________________

Nevertheless, when we work attentively, therein lies the principle that makes it possible to surpass our predecessors.

That you still do not grasp the certainty of this principle is because your thinking scatters, like wild horses, and your emotions run wild, like monkeys in a forest. If you can make those monkeys and horses, just once, take the backward step that turns the light and shines it inward, then naturally you will be completely integrated. This is the means by which we, who are [ordinarily] set into motion by things, become able to set things into motion.

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen - Translated by Griffith Foulk




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)

It Helps To Be Dead

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( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XII )




Let's talk about old, long dead guys.

They are a tough act to follow.



_____________________________

With resolve and sincerity, one should aim to exceed the ancients in purity and surpass the former worthies in attentiveness. The way to put that aspiration into practice in one's own person is, for example, to take the same three coins that one's predecessors spent to make a soup of the crudest greens and use them to now to make a soup of the finest cream. This is difficult to do. Why is that? Because present and past are completely different, like the distance between heaven and earth. How could we ever be able to equal their stature? Nevertheless, when we work attentively, therein lies the principle that makes it possible to surpass our predecessors.

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen - Translated by Griffith Foulk




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)
( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XI )


Someone in our Sangha made a special request for me to jump back a bit, to a couple of lines I had passed over.  He likes the quote ...



So, will do! Here it is, Fugen ...



(and I'll try not to make a 'pot head' joke)


_____________________________

During the day and through the night, whether things come and dwell in your mind or your mind turns and dwells on things, put yourself on a par with them and diligently pursue the way. Prior to the third watch take stock of the next morning's tasks; after the third watch take charge of making the morning gruel. When that day's gruel is finished, wash the pots, steam the rice, and prepare the soup. When soaking the rice for the midday meal, the cook should not leave the vicinity of the sink. Keep a sharp eye on everything, so as not to waste even a single grain, and properly rinse out any foreign objects. Put the rice in the pots, light the fires, and steam it. Of old it was said, "When steaming rice, treat the pot as one's own head; when rinsing the rice, know that the water is one's own lifeblood." When the steaming is done, collect the rice in bamboo baskets or rice tubs and place it on the table. Preparation of vegetables, soup, and the like, should be done while the rice is being steamed.

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen - Translated by Griffith Foulk




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)

Introducing 'Tin Tin Sensei' ...

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This little funny going around the Zen-blogosphere reminded me that I should introduce our newest Zen teacher at Treeleaf .... Tin Tin Sensei (he even looks a little like the cat in the picture)  ...


Ya see ... unlike you and me, cats don't need to study and pursue "The Way" ... they don't even need to ask about it ....



Delete Soto Cat.jpg


______________________________________________


(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)

'MONDAYS with TAIGU' - Kesa

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Kesa







(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)


Pease join our OCTOBER MONTHLY 4-hour 'Live from Treeleaf' ZAZENKAI, recorded in "real time" and available at the following links:

Part of our Zazenkai was taken over by our new kitten ... and by our son chasing after his new kitten.

AS WELL, DUE TO TECHNICAL DIFFICULTIES, PLEASE SELF-TIME THE 2:40 ZAZEN SITTING, as the recording cuts midway. It resumes from the following Kinhin.

The recording is divided into 3 parts as follows (click on the blue link) :

00:00 - 00:50 CEREMONY (HEART SUTRA / SANDOKAI) & ZAZEN
00:50 - 01:00 KINHIN
01:00 - 01:40 ZAZEN
01:40 - 01:50 KINHIN

ZAZENKAI PART I

01:50 - 02:30 DHARMA TALK & ZAZEN
02:30 - 02:40 KINHIN
02:40 - 03:20 ZAZEN (RECORDING CUTS BEFORE END OF ZAZEN; PLEASE SELF-TIME)


03:20 - 03:30 KINHIN (RECORDING RESUMES)
03:30 - 04:00 METTA CHANT & ZAZEN, VERSE OF ATONEMENT, FOUR VOWS, & CLOSING

Remember, when we drop all thought of 'here' 'there' 'now' and 'then' ... we are sitting all together!

Our Zazenkai consists of our chanting the 'Heart Sutra' and the 'Identity of Relative and Absolute (Sandokai)' in English (please download our Chant Book at the link below), some full floor prostrations (please follow along with me ... or a simple Gassho can be substituted if you wish), a little talk by me ... and we close with the 'Metta Chant', followed at the end with the 'Verse of Atonement' and 'The Four Vows'.

Please download and print out the Chant Book (PDF) at the following link:


Please join in, one and all.


I SUGGEST THAT YOU POSITION YOUR ZAFU ON THE FLOOR IN A PLACE WHERE YOU ARE NOT STARING DIRECTLY AT THE COMPUTER SCREEN, BUT CAN GLANCE OVER AND SEE THE SCREEN WHEN NECESSARY. YOUR ZAFU SHOULD ALSO BE IN A POSITION WHERE YOU CAN SEE THE COMPUTER SCREEN WHILE STANDING IN FRONT OF THE ZAFU FOR THE CEREMONIES.

ALSO, REMEMBER TO SET YOUR COMPUTER (& SCREEN SAVER) SO THAT IT DOES NOT SHUT OFF DURING THE 4 HOURS.



Gassho, Jundo

To Dad

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( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - X )


Some people are just "naturally Zen" ...

... naturally wise, compassionate, tolerant and strong through much of their life ... no matter what it hands them ...

 ... like my late father, Leon.

I'd like to tell his story a little.

_____________________________

When ordinarily preparing ingredients, do not regard them with ordinary [deluded] eyes, or think of them with ordinary emotions. "Lifting a single blade of grass builds a shrine; entering a single mote of dust turns the great wheel of the dharma." Even when, for example, one makes a soup of the crudest greens, one should not give rise to a mind that loathes it or takes it lightly; and even when one makes a soup of the finest cream, one should not give rise to a mind that feels glad and rejoices in it. If one is at the outset free from preferences, how could one have any aversions? Even when confronted with poor ingredients, there is no negligence whatsoever; even when faced with scanty ingredients, one exerts oneself. Do not change your mind in accordance with things. Whoever changes his mind in accordance with things, or revises his words to suit the person [he is speaking to], is not a man of the way.

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen - Translated by Griffith Foulk




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)

A Shrine in a Blade of Grass ...

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( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - IX )


Today's passage makes reference to a famous Koan and story ...


When the World-honored One [The Buddha] was walking with the assembly of his followers, he pointed to the ground with his hand and said, "This place is suitable to build a shrine." The deva Indra then took a single blade of grass, stuck it in the ground, and said, "I have built the shrine." The World-honored One smiled (Case 4 in the Book of Serenity)

... and to this too ...


The tathâgatas of the ten directions, embracing the spirit of this dharani, turn the great wheel of the dharma in lands innumerable as motes of dust. (fascicle 7 of the Shurangama-samâdhi-sûtra)


Each brings to mind the poem by William Blake, Auguries of Innocense ...

To see a world in a grain of sand,
And a heaven in a wild flower,
Hold infinity in the palm of your hand,
And eternity in an hour.


_____________________________

The cook keeps careful watch over the area where the rice and soup are prepared, giving commands to the postulants, the servants, and the fire stokers, and instructing them in the handling of the various utensils. Nowadays, large monasteries have rice cooks and soup cooks, but those are nevertheless under the command of the cook. In the past there were no such rice or soup cooks, only the single officer, the cook himself.

When ordinarily preparing ingredients, do not regard them with ordinary [deluded] eyes, or think of them with ordinary emotions. "Lifting a single blade of grass builds a shrine; entering a single mote of dust turns the great wheel of the dharma." Even when, for example, one makes a soup of the crudest greens, one should not give rise to a mind that loathes it or takes its lightly; and even when one makes a soup of the finest cream, one should not give rise to a mind that feels glad and rejoices in it. If one is at the outset free from preferences, how could one have any aversions? Even when confronted with poor ingredients, there is no negligence whatsoever; even when faced with scanty ingredients, one exerts oneself. Do not change your mind in accordance with things. Whoever changes his mind in accordance with things, or revises his words to suit the person [he is speaking to], is not a man of the way.

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen - Translated by Griffith Foulk




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)