December 2009 Archives

( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XXXIII FINALE)

As we close this year 2009 ... all is truly but a constant beginning, ever new ...

And as we conclude our reading of the Tenzo Kyokun, there remains ongoing life and practice ...

In these final passages, Master Dogen reminds us to be joyful, to take care of our responsibilities like a parent for a child, and to embody "Great Mind and Vast Heart" ...

For the first, he writes (as we saw yesterday)

Now we have the good fortune to be born as human beings ... Let us be joyous.

For "Mother Mind" he writes ...

So-called [motherly heart] is the spirit of fathers and mothers. ... Without regard for their own poverty or wealth, [parents] earnestly turn their thoughts toward raising their child. Without regard for whether they themselves are cold or hot, they shade the child or cover the child.


And for "Great Mind, Vast Heart", he states [in a good reminder for the turning year],

This vast heart ... does not follow the sounds of spring or try to nest in a spring garden; it does not darken with the colours of autumn. See the changes of the seasons as all one movement,  [all] in relation to each other within a view which includes both."

He then concludes with three famous Koan stories which exemplify the point.


*   *   *   *  *


And so, from tomorrow, January 1st, we depart Beliefnet and move our home for this daily "Sit-a-long with Jundo" Zazen netcast to SHAMBHALA SUNSPACE, the webpage of the Shambhala Sun and Buddhadharma magazines.

I want to thank so much Beliefnet, their editors and staff, for this past wonderful year and all their assistance and support ...

... and wish them ... and everyone ... a most content and peaceful 2010.


___________________________


  This life we live is a life of rejoicing, this body a body of joy which can be used to present offerings to the Three Jewels. It arises through the merits of eons and using it thus its merit extends endlessly. I hope that you will work and cook in this way, using this body which is the fruition of thousands of lifetimes and births to create limitless benefit for numberless beings. To understand this opportunity is a joyous heart because even if you had been born a ruler of the world the merit of your actions would merely disperse like foam, like sparks.

  A "motherly heart" is a heart which maintains the Three Jewels as a parent cares for a child. A parent raises a child with deep love, regardless of poverty or difficulties. Their hearts cannot be understood by another; only a parent can understand it. A parent protects their child from heat or cold before worrying about whether they themselves are hot or cold. This kind of care can only be understood by those who have given rise to it and realized only by those who practice it. This, brought to its fullest, is how you must care for water and rice, as though they were your own children.

  The Great Master Sakyamuni offered to us the final twenty years of his own lifetime to protect us through these days of decline. What is this other than the exertion of this "parental heart"? The Thus Come One did not do this hoping to get something out of it but sheerly out of munificence.

  "Vast heart" [or "Great Mind"] is like a great expanse of ocean or a towering mountain. It views everything from the most inclusive and broadest perspective. This vast heart does not regard a gram as too light or five kilos as too heavy. It does not follow the sounds of spring or try to nest in a spring garden; it does not darken with the colours of autumn. See the changes of the seasons as all one movement, understand light and heavy in relation to each other within a view which includes both. When you write or study the character "vast," this is how you should understand its meaning.

  If the tenzo at Jiashan had not thus studied the word "vast," he could not have woken up Elder Fu by laughing at him [from a story in which a monk's laughter spurred Elder Fu on to great practice].If Zen Master Guishan had not understand the word "vast," he would not have blown on dead firewood three times.[from a story in fascicle 6 of the Jingde Record: Once when the teacher [Baizhang] was working with Guishan he asked, "Have you any fire, or not?" Guishan said, "I have." The teacher said, "Where is it?" Guishan took a stick of wood, blew on it two or three times, and passed it to the teacher.] If the monk Dongshan had not understood the word "vast," he could not have taught the monk through his expression, "Three pounds of flax."[from case 18 of the koan collection Gateless Barrier (Wumenguan):A monk asked Dongshan, "What is buddha like?" Dongshan replied, "Three pounds of flax."]

  All of these and other great masters through the ages have studied the meaning of "vast" or "great" not only though the word for it but through all of the events and activities of their lives. Thus they lived as a great shout of freedom through presenting the Great Matter, penetrating the Great Question, training great disciples and in this way bringing it all forth to us.

  The abbot, senior officers and staff, and all monks should always maintain these three hearts or understandings.

 

Written in the spring of 1237 for those of coming generations

who will practice the Way by Dogen, abbot of Kosho-(Horin-)ji temple

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen -

Translated by Yasuda Joshu and Anzan Hoshin [with additions from T. Griffith Foulk]




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)


Between Heaven and Hell

(And, in case you have not heard ... after a lovely year here at Beliefnet.com, our daily "Sit-a-long with Jundo" Zazen netcasts will be moving home on January 1st to SHAMBHALA SUNSPACE, the webpage of the Shambhala Sun and Buddhadharma magazines, where we will be a daily featured Buddhist blog ... sitting there just as we do here. !)


( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XXXII)




This world and life into which we find we were born is far from perfect, often difficult ... yet how fortunate we are that this life is as it is ... neither heaven nor hell (though we can help make it a little bit of each) ... but a place to care, to practice, to live ...


___________________________

In general, the various stewards and prefects, including the cook, should maintain a joyful mind, [a motherly heart], and a great [and vast] mind whenever they perform rituals or engage in work.

So-called joyful mind is the spirit of happiness. You should consider that if you were born in a heaven, you would be attached to pleasures without cease and would not be able to arouse the thought of enlightenment. Practice would not be feasible. Even less would you be able to prepare meals as offerings to the three jewels [Buddha, Dharma and Sangha]! Among the myriad dharmas, the most revered and precious are the three jewels. The most superior things are the three jewels. Indra cannot compare. A wheel-turning king does not equal them. The Rules of Purity says, "Revered by the world, it is an excellent space outside [worldly] things; pure and detached, the assembly of monks is best." Now we have the good fortune to be born as human beings and to prepare the food that these three jewels receive and use. Is this not of great karmic significance? We should thus be very happy.

Again, you should consider that if you were born into the realms of hell, hungry ghosts, animals, anti-gods, and the like, or born in circumstances where you suffered from one of the eight difficulties [such as being born in a place or time where the Dharma is not practiced or taught, being born without the faculties that would allow us to practice or locked into the views of social conventions], even if you sought to cover yourself in the power of the sangha, your hands would naturally be unable to prepare pure meals as offerings to the three jewels. Relying on that painful physical form you would receive pain and be bound in body and mind. Now, in this life, you have already prepared those meals. How happy a birth! How happy a body! It is the good karmic result of kalpas vast and great. It is merit that cannot decay. When you prepare food and cook it you should do so with the aspiration of taking tens of thousands of births and concentrating them into this one day, this one time, that you may be able to bind together in good karmic result the bodies of millions of [past] births. A mind that contemplates and understands things in this way is a joyful mind. Truly, even if one takes on the body of a wheel-turning holy king, if one does not prepare meals as offerings to the three jewels, in the end it has no benefit. It is only of the nature of water, froth, bubbles, or flames.

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen -

Translated by T. Griffith Foulk [with additions by Yasuda Joshu and Anzan Hoshin] 




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)


Life Is Our Temple

( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XXXI)


Right here, right now ... this is the time and place of realization  ... awakening and making it real ...


___________________________

When I observed accomplished people in the past who held the position of cook, their personal qualities were naturally in accord with their official roles. The Great [Teacher Guishan Lingyou (771-853)] awakened to the way when he was a cook. Dongshan's [famous saying] "Three pounds of hemp" [in response to the question, "What is Buddha"] was also when he was a cook. If there is a matter that can be valued, you should value the matter of awakening to the way. If there is a time that can be valued, surely you should value the time of awakening to the way! The result of cherishing that matter and being addicted to the way is attested especially by the [story of] "grasping sand and making a jewel" [a traditional story with a meaning such as "whatever is available at hand can be turned into something wonderful]. We can often see the effect of making an image [of the Buddha] and worshipping [before it]. The position of cook is similar [in its karmic results], but even more so. Its name is the same [as in the past]. If the cook is someone who can transmit its character and its practice, how could its beauty and its fulfillment fail to appear?

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen -

Translated by T. Griffith Foulk




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)



A new year ... no expectations ...


(After a lovely year here at Beliefnet.com, our daily "Sit-a-long with Jundo" Zazen netcasts will be moving home on January 1st to SHAMBHALA SUNSPACE, the webpage of the Shambhala Sun and Buddhadharma magazines, where we will be a daily featured Buddhist blog ... sitting there just as we do here. )

  


(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)


Service to Others ... as Oneself

( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XXX)




The value of service to others ... as oneself, not two



___________________________

In the many monasteries of the mountains of Song China that I have seen, the monks holding the various offices train in these posts for a year at a time, each of them in each moment practicing by three standards. Firstly, to benefit others benefits yourself. Second, make every effort to maintain and renew the monastic environment. Third, follow the standards set forth by the examples of excellent practitioners of past and present and come to stand with them.

You should understand that foolish people hold their practice as if it belonged to someone else, wise people practice with everyone as themselves.

An ancient teacher said,


"Two-thirds of your life has passed

without clarifying who you are.

Eating your life,

muddling about in this and that,

you don't even turn when called on.

Pathetic."

 

From this verse we can see that if you have not met a true teacher, you will just follow the lead of your tendencies. And this is pathetic. It's like the story of the foolish son who leaves his parent's home with the family treasure and then throws it away on a dung heap. Do not waste your opportunity as that man did.

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen -

Translated by Yasuda Joshu and Anzan Hoshin 




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)


A Merry Buddhist Christmas!

I would like to wish each and all members of Treeleaf, and our "Sit-a-Long" family, a Very Merry Christmas ...

.... as well as All the Happy Holidays of Peace and Goodwil, whenever and whatever they are ...

 ... and a Very Tranquil and Content 'Just This Very Moment' too, ever new and changing ...


buddhasanta.jpg

Gassho and Ho Ho Ho, Jundo


------------

And, in case you have not heard ... after a lovely year here at Beliefnet.com, our daily "Sit-a-long with Jundo" Zazen netcasts will be moving home on January 1st to SHAMBHALA SUNSPACE, the webpage of the Shambhala Sun and Buddhadharma magazines, where we will be a daily featured Buddhist blog ... sitting there just as we do here. !

  


(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)


Second Jundo


Well, I am tickled to present my recent talk in Second Life ...

The elaborate golden robes were chosen for me ... as was the body complete with 6-Pack abs! It truly is a fantasy world! 

But my son is thrilled that Papa is now a Anime character.

The talk took place at the pretty amazing Kannonji meditation hall, with 1,300 members, from all Buddhist traditions ... some of whom are pirates, golden fairies, meditating dogs, flying dragons and .... the imagination is the only limit!

Click Here to visit Kannonji in Second Life
(although requires viewer software install)

The talk was called "Second Life, First Life, No Birth No Death Life" ... and is in 7 parts (a talk of about a half hour, a Q&A and then a sitting). Please enjoy!

http://www.youtube.com/view_play_list?p=A6947E5CADEEB33F 



... and the rest of the parts are here ...



And ... A reminder that, after a lovely year here at Beliefnet.com, our daily "Sit-a-long with Jundo" Zazen netcasts will be moving home on January 1st to SHAMBHALA SUNSPACE, the webpage of the Shambhala Sun and Buddhadharma magazines, where we will be a daily featured Buddhist blog ... sitting there just as we do here. )
        Continuing our glimpse at ...


... catching a glimpse, the watcher

oxherding glimpse.gif


(After a lovely year here at Beliefnet.com, our daily "Sit-a-long with Jundo" Zazen netcasts will be moving home on January 1st to SHAMBHALA SUNSPACE, the webpage of the Shambhala Sun and Buddhadharma magazines, where we will be a daily featured Buddhist blog ... sitting there just as we do here. )

  


(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)


In The Hospital


In the hospital for a little touch of pneumonia ,,, for a few days, doctor says.

So, please sit around the bed with me today.

When one coughs, just cough ... that too is Zazen.

Wheeze wheeze is Buddha's Teaching.

And isn't it wonderful to have a Sangha where all can sit together when one of us is in bed sick? (I received notes from a couple of folks who sit with our Sangha all the time in bed due to health) 

(A silent sitting today, and no bell, so please turn the sound down,as the air machine next to the bed is a bit noisy ... )

...... oh, and we'll not be able to have a Saturday Zazenkai this week (I will post an older recording) ... but please know we will be sitting together anyway ... as always ...

------------

And to say again ... after a lovely year here at Beliefnet.com, our daily "Sit-a-long with Jundo" Zazen netcasts will be moving home on January 1st to SHAMBHALA SUNSPACE, the webpage of the Shambhala Sun and Buddhadharma magazines, where we will be a daily featured Buddhist blog ... sitting there just as we do here. !

  


(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)



catching a glimpse, the watcher

oxherding glimpse.gif


(After a lovely year here at Beliefnet.com, our daily "Sit-a-long with Jundo" Zazen netcasts will be moving home on January 1st to SHAMBHALA SUNSPACE, the webpage of the Shambhala Sun and Buddhadharma magazines, where we will be a daily featured Buddhist blog ... sitting there just as we do here. )

  


(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)


Home for the Holidays ...

(Monday with Taigu will be Wednesday!)


Heading home to see family and friends always presents a few special "opportunities for Practice" at this time of year ...


And speaking of home ... after a lovely year here at Beliefnet.com, our daily "Sit-a-long with Jundo" Zazen netcasts will be moving home on January 1st to SHAMBHALA SUNSPACE, the webpage of the Shambhala Sun and Buddhadharma magazines, where we will be a daily featured Buddhist blog ... sitting there just as we do here. And, taking our spot here at Beliefnet will be a truly wonderful Buddhist blogger ... whose name I do not wish to tell you yet, partly for fear of spoiling the surprise! But that blog will be a wonderful addition to Beliefnet!

  


(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)


New Home

A couple of big announcements here  ...

First, thanks to our wonderful carpenters, the new/old Zen Hall at Treeleaf in Japan is now about ready ... the tatami mats are in, the Zafus, and Buddha is in his place ... (Please see the pictures below of the interior, and the exterior in scaffolding which they are still repairing)

Second, after a lovely year here at Beliefnet.com, our daily "Sit-a-long with Jundo" Zazen netcasts will be moving home on January 1st to SHAMBHALA SUNSPACE, the webpage of the Shambhala Sun and Buddhadharma magazines, where we will be a daily featured Buddhist blog ... sitting there just as we do here. And, taking our spot here at Beliefnet will be a truly wonderful Buddhist blogger ... whose name I do not wish to tell you yet, partly for fear of spoiling the surprise! But that blog will be a wonderful addition to Beliefnet!



  

1211 NewZenHall 2 cut.jpg

1211NewZenHall1 cut.jpg

(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)


Shirking

( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XXIX)



Hey, I think we've all worked with a guy like this at one time or another ...

... In fact, this guy is --me-- more of the time than I care to admit ...



(sorry if today's posting is late ... I was procrastinating ... :oops:)


___________________________

After I returned to Japan I stayed at Kennin-ji for around two years. They had the office of tenzo there but it was only nominal because no one actually carried out the real activity of this training post. They did not understand it as the activity of Awake Awareness so how could they have been able to use it to express the Way? Truly, it was very sad. The tenzo there had never encountered a living one who could use the office of tenzo as the functioning of Awake Awareness and so he carelessly idled away, breaking the standards of practice.

I watched the tenzo there quite closely. He never actually worked at preparing the morning and evening meals but just ordered about some rough servants, lacking in intelligence and heart, leaving to them all the tasks whether important or not. He never checked on whether they were working well or not, as if it would be shameful to do so like peeping into the private quarters of a neighbouring woman. He just hung about in his own rooms, reading sutras or chanting when he wasn't lying down or chatting. Months would go by before he would even come close to a pot, let alone buy utensils or make out a menu. He did not understand that these activities are the exertion of Awareness. The practice of donning the wrap robe and offering nine bows before sending out the food was something he would never have even dreamed of; it just wouldn't have occurred to him. As he himself did not understand the office of tenzo, when it came time for him to teach a novice how to carry out the office what understanding could be passed on? It was very regrettable. Although one might have the fortune to hold this post, if one is without the mind which uncovers the Way and fails to meet with one who has the virtue of the Way, it is like returning empty-handed after climbing a mountain of treasure or entering an ocean of jewels.

[You should know that even if he never aroused the thought of enlightenment, if he had seen a single person who set a worthy example he would have attained that way in his practice. And even if he never saw a single person who set a worthy example, if his thought of enlightenment had been profound, he would have hit upon that way in his practice. But in actuality both were lacking, so there was no way for him to benefit.]

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen -

Translated by Yasuda Joshu and Anzan Hoshin [portion from Griffith Foulk]




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)


People Will Be People ...

( Dogen's Instructions for the Cook - XXVIII)

We continue with Master Dogen's Tenzo Kyokun ...

Today, I happened to hear from a couple of people who were disappointed by someone in their lives ... friends, family members, co-workers who let them down a bit.

Master Dogen provides a good perspective on this ...

... Hey buddy, don't forget to look in the mirror before pointing fingers at others ... See the dignity and worth of all people ... People are people, and act like people ... Know that there are days when we are all foolish, and how we were yesterday is not necessarily how we will be tomorrow.

Also, know how to stand beyond opinions of right and wrong ...

We cannot always control what other people do to us ... but we have control over how we react to what other people do.

Joko Beck Roshi, in Everyday Zen, tells the 'empty rowboat' story I mentioned ...

Suppose we are out on a lake and it's a bit foggy-not too foggy, but a bit foggy-and we're rowing along in our little boat having a good time. And then, all of a sudden, coming out of the fog, there's this other rowboat and it's heading right at us. And...crash! Well, for a second we're really angry-what is that fool doing? I just painted my boat! And here he comes-crash!-right into it. And then suddenly we notice that the rowboat is empty. What happens to our anger? Well, the anger collapses...I'll just have to paint my boat again, that's all. But if that rowboat that hit ours had another person in it, how would we react? You know what would happen! Now our encounters with life, with other people, with events, are like being bumped by an empty rowboat. But we don't experience it that way. We experience it as though there are people in that other rowboat and we're really getting clobbered by them. ...

___________________________

Do not discriminate between the faults or virtues of the monks or whether they are senior or junior. You do not even know where you stand, so how can you put others into categories. Judging others from within the boundaries of your own opinions, how could you be anything other than wrong? Although there are differences between seniors and juniors [and some have wisdom while others are foolish or dim], all are equally members of the assembly. Those who had many faults yesterday may be correct and clear today. Who can judge "sacred" from "common." The Zen Monastic Standards states, "Whether foolish or wise, the fact that one trains as a monk provides for others a gift that penetrates everywhere." 

If you stand beyond opinions of right and wrong, you bring forth the practice of actualizing unsurpassable Awakening.
If you do not, you take a wrong step and miss what's there. The bones and marrow of the ancients was just the exertion of such practice and those monks who train as tenzo in the future realize the bones and marrow of the Way only through just such exertion. The monastic rules set forth by great master Baizhang must always be maintained.

From: Tenzo Kyokun - Instructions for the Cook by Eihei Dogen -

Translated by Yasuda Joshu and Anzan Hoshin




(remember: recording ends soon after the beginning bells;
a sitting time of 20 to 35 minutes is recommended)



zazenrohatsu2009B.jpg


WELCOME ...

... to the "ALL_ONLINE" 'Treeleaf Two-Day Rohatsu Retreat', which was held by LIVE NETCAST over the weekend of DECEMBER 5 and 6, 2009.

 


HOWEVER,
you may still join the Retreat and sit-a-long at ANY TIME 'ON DEMAND', by the real time recorded version below (no different from the original!). The full sitting schedule is below, and you may download our Chant Book here, and various retreat pointers here.


Recordings of each segment are posted below in time order ... and if we drop from mind all thought of 'now' 'then' 'here' and 'there' ... we will all be sitting together right when and where you are!

This Retreat is especially dedicated to my Teacher, Gudo Wafu Nishijima, who turned 90 years old this week!

We thank Rev. Taigu for coming all the way by train from the other side of Japan to join us. However, because of a delay in his travels, please excuse his absence during part of the first day.

In case of technical problems. please just go along as best you can with the schedule ... we sit with "what is".. .

OF COURSE, EVERYTHING IN MODERATION ... if the sitting ever feels too much, be sure to walk lots and lots of Kinhin (even if during a sitting period). And if the whole retreat becomes too much, or you feel ill, you may slow down ... , spread things out, shorten the sittings ... or STOP! Be sure that you have someone close by whom you can call, or who can check on you from time to time. If there is any question about health, do not take any chances.

Please write and let me know how it goes. Gassho, Jundo

_____________________________________________

DAY 1 UNIT 1
(Live Netcast: Start = FRIDAY NY 4pm London 9pm / End = FRIDAY NY 6:55pm, London 11:55pm)
(ALL TIMES APPROXIMATE)

DAY 1
06:00-06:50 AM Entrance by Officiant (Jundo) & Zazen
06:50-07:00 Kinhin* (All Kinhin times can be bathroom break)
07:00-07:35 Zazen
07:35-07:45 Kinhin




07:45-08:25 Zazen + Kesa Verse
08:25-08:55 "Long" Service
08:55-09:20 REST PERIOD




_____________________________________________

DAY 1 UNIT 2
(Live Netcast: Start=FRIDAY NY 7:20pm London SATURDAY 12:20am /End=FRIDAY NY 7:50pm, SATURDAY London 12:50am)

09:20-09:50 Oryoki Bring you bowls and small table before start.
09:50-10:30 Samu/Rest Period Mindfully wash and repack Oryoki bowls.




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DAY 1 UNIT 3
(Live Netcast: Start=FRIDAY NY 8:30pm London SATURDAY 1:30am /End=FRIDAY NY 10:45pm, SATURDAY London 3:45am)


10:30-11:10 Zazen
11:10-11:20 Kinhin
11:20-12:00 Zazen &Dharma Talk Chant Gatha on Opening & Closing Sutra




12:00-12:10 Kinhin
12:10-12:45 Zazen
12:45-13:10 REST PERIOD



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DAY 1 UNIT 4
(Live Netcast: Start=FRIDAY NY 11:10pm London SATURDAY 4:10am /End=FRIDAY NY 11:40pm, SATURDAY London 4:40am)

13:10-13:40 Oryoki Bring you bowls and small table before start.
13:40-14:30 Samu/Rest Period Mindfully wash and repack Oryoki bowls.



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DAY 1 UNIT 5
(Live Netcast: Start=SATURDAY NY 12:30am London 5:30am /End=SATURDAY NY 1:30am, London 6:30am)


14:30-15:00 Samu Work Practice Indoor if night time, Outdoor if daytime and possible
15:00-16:00 REST PERIOD



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DAY 1 UNIT 6
(Live Netcast: Start=SATURDAY NY 2:00am London 7:00am /End=SATURDAY NY 4:25am, London 9:25am)

16:00-16:40 Zazen
16:40-16:50 Kinhin
16:50-17:40 Zazen &Dharma Talk Chant Gatha on Opening & Closing Sutra




17:40-17:50 Kinhin
17:50-18:25 Zazen
18:25-19:00 REST PERIOD



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DAY 1 UNIT 7
(Live Netcast: Start=SATURDAY NY 5:00am London 10:00am /End=SATURDAY NY 5:30am, London 10:30am)

19:00-19:30 Oryoki Bring you bowls and small table before start.
19:30-20:10 Samu/Rest Period Mindfully wash and repack Oryoki bowls.



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DAY 1 UNIT 8
(Live Netcast: Start=SATURDAY NY 6:10am London 11:10am /End=SATURDAY NY 6:40am, London 11:40am)

20:10-20:40 Samu Work Practice Indoor if night time, Outdoor if daytime and possible
20:40-21:00 REST PERIOD





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DAY 1 UNIT 9
(Live Netcast: Start=SATURDAY NY 7:00am London Noon /End=SATURDAY NY 9:30am, London 2:30pm)

21:00-21:50 "Short" Service & Zazen Please follow along in the Sutra Books that will be provided. Floor prostrations when here ching-ching-ching-ching- ching roll of bell.
21:50-22:00 Kinhin
22:00-22:40 Zazen &Dharma Talk Chant Gatha on Opening & Closing Sutra




22:40-22:50 Kinhin
22:50-23:30 Fukanzazengi & Zazen Close with Verse of Atonement & Four Vows



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DAY 1 UNIT 10
( No Live Netcast from SATURDAY NY 9:30am London 2:30pm to NY 4:00pm, London 9:00pm)
PLEASE CATCH UP WITH MISSED OVERNIGHT UNITS!

(Optional: Waza = Tradition of 'All Night Zazen' ... but we recommend you sleep instead.
See you in the morning)

23:30 PM-
(Day 2)
05:30 AM
BATH & SLEEP


NO RECORDING OF ABOVE


____________________________________________
____________________________________________

NOTE: TODAY'S SCHEDULE HAS BEEN CHANGED!!
RETREAT WILL END APPROXIMATELY
2 HOURS EARLIER
THAN ORIGINALLY SCHEDULED


DAY 2 UNIT 1
(Live Netcast: Start = SATURDAY NY 4pm London 9pm / End = SATURDAY NY 6:55pm, London 11:55pm)
(ALL TIMES APPROXIMATE)

06:00-06:40 AM Zazen Begin sitting without instruction. If you usually wear a Rakusu, DO NOT wear it yet (keep it in its bag) until Takkesage (Kesa Verse) later in morning.
06:40-07:00 Long (20 minute) Kinhin*
07:00-07:35 Zazen
07:35-07:45 Kinhin




07:45-08:25 Zazen + Kesa Verse When instructed, place on Kesa and recite Kesa Verse. All others, hands in Gassho.
08:25-08:55 "Long" Service Please follow along in the Sutra Books that will be provided. Floor prostrations when hear ching-ching-ching-ching- ching roll of bell.
08:55-09:20 REST PERIOD



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DAY 2 UNIT 2
(Live Netcast:Start=SATURDAY NY 7:20pm London SUNDAY 12:20am/End=SATURDAY NY 7:50pm, SUNDAY London 12:50am)

09:20-09:50 Oryoki Bring you bowls and small table before start.
09:50-10:30 Samu/Rest Period Mindfully wash and repack Oryoki bowls.



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DAY 2 UNIT 3
(Live Netcast: Start=SATURDAY NY 8:30pm London SUNDAY 1:30am/End=SATURDAY NY 10:45pm, SUNDAY London 3:45am)


10:30-11:10 Zazen
11:10-11:20 Kinhin
11:20-12:00 Zazen &Dharma Talk Chant Gatha on Opening & Closing Sutra




12:00-12:10 Kinhin
12:10-12:45 Zazen
12:45-13:10 REST PERIOD



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DAY 2 UNIT 4
(Live Netcast:Start=SATURDAY NY 11:10pm London SUNDAY 4:10am/End=SATURDAY NY 11:40pm, SUNDAY London 4:40am)

13:10-13:40 Oryoki Bring you bowls and small table before start.
13:40-14:30 Samu/Rest Period Mindfully wash and repack Oryoki bowls.


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DAY 2 UNIT 5
(Live Netcast: Start=SUNDAY NY 12:30am London 5:30am /End=SUNDAY NY 1:30am, London 6:30am)

14:30-15:30 Samu Work Practice Indoor if night time, Outdoor if daytime and possible
15:30-16:00 REST PERIOD



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NEW SCHEDULE!! ---

DAY 2 UNIT 6
(Live Netcast: Start=SUNDAY NY 2:00am London 7:00am /End=SUNDAY NY 4:00 am, London 9:00am)

16:00-16:40 Zazen
16:40-16:50 Kinhin
16:50-17:20 Zazen & Dharma Talk Chant Gatha on Opening & Closing Sutra




17:20-17:30 Kinhin
17:30-18:00 Zazen
18:00-19:00 REST PERIOD



_____________________________________________

NEW SCHEDULE!! ---

DAY 2 UNIT 9
(Live Netcast: Start=SUNDAY NY 5:00am London 10:00am /End=SUNDAY NY 7:30am, London 12:30pm)

19:00-19:50 "Short" Service & Zazen Please follow along in the Sutra Books that will be provided. Floor prostrations when here ching-ching-ching-ching- ching roll of bell.
19:50-20:00 Kinhin
20:00-20:40 Zazen &Dharma Talk Chant Gatha on Opening & Closing Sutra



20:40-20:50 Kinhin
20:50-21:30 Metta Chant & Zazen
& CLOSING WORDS Close with Verse of Atonement & Four Vows





Nine Bows to All Who Sat This Retreat Together ...



RETREAT !! RETREAT!! (VII) - Oryoki Part II

NOTE TO EVERYONE SITTING THE RETREAT: Please look at the sitting time schedule (to be the same as last year HERE) and plan out which recorded periods you will sit, and which live versions you will be able to sit and when in your time Zone. Not so complex to figure out once you look at the schedule.

I hope that many folks will elect to sit "real time" with Taigu and me. If sitting "real time", the retreat should encompass most all of your Saturday and Sunday (starting 6am, although you may join us a bit on your Friday night too if you wish) in most of Europe and North America, until late in the evening. The way to accomplish that is for everyone to sit a combination of "live" and "recorded" segments over the weekend. In other words, some activities you can join live and other activities (because they happened in the middle of the night where you are, during your sleep time) you can do with the recording (while it is the middle of the night in Japan and Taigu and I are sleeping!)

See how that works! 8)
__________________

We will 'be dancing' a simple Oryoki for our 'Treeleaf Two-Day Online Retreat' scheduled for LIVE NETCAST over this weekend of DECEMBER 5 and 6, 2009 (and available in recorded form after that, for participation any time 'On Demand'). ...

 ... Traditional Oryoki practice consists of scores of set movements for eating, each of which must be learned and mastered, much like a ballet. Here is a small sample, this merely for wiping and repacking the spoon, chopsticks and settsu (bowl washing stick) at the end of the meal ...

1) Pick up spoon in right hand with the handle pointing toward you. Put it in your left hand. Pick up setsu with right hand; put bowl of spoon into water in middle bowl and clean it with setsu. Do both sides. Hold spoon straight.

2) Put setsu in middle bowl, pointing straight out. Put spoon in right hand. With left hand, fold the exposed corner of the drying cloth over the bowl of the spoon without taking the cloth out of the Buddha bowl. Wipe bowl of spoon; turn spoon 180 degrees so bowl is pointing toward you and push it through cloth.

3) Spoon is now in your right hand, bowl down and pointing left. Without picking up utensil holder, slide spoon into it. (The opening in utensil holder should be on your right, with the fold on the left.)

4) Repeat steps 1) and 2) above with chopsticks.

5) In left hand pick up folded utensil holder that contains spoon. Slide sticks into utensil holder, toward you. Work utensils to bottom with right hand. Do not let utensils drop of their own weight.

6) Fold over the utensil holder and replace it in front of you, this time with the opening on the left. The pointed half is on top, with the opening down (not visible). Fold is now on the right.

We will be doing a simplified, sometimes improvised and creative version but, I hope, no less mindful. The attitude and spirit are the most important.

PLEASE PRESS ON BELOW PICTURE TO PLAY:

RETREAT !! RETREAT!! (VI) - Oryoki Part I

We will be making a simple 'Oryoki set for our 'Treeleaf Two-Day Online Retreat' scheduled for LIVE NETCAST over this coming weekend of DECEMBER 5 and 6, 2009 (and available in recorded form after that, for participation any time 'On Demand').

DETAILS CLICK HERE ...


All you need is:

1 - Clean Pillow Case
2 - Bowls and 1 Tea Cup (that fit into each other)
1 - Jar Lid or Flat Small Dish
1 - Cloth Napkin (or Paper Napkin)
1 - Table Spoon
1 - Tea Spoon
1 - Small Cut Piece of a New Sponge
1 - Long Envelope
Tomorrow we will talk about how to use all that.

But I would like to mention food for the Retreat: We are each our own Tenzo (temple cook). I would prepare in advance simple yet nutritious foods (something that can be easily heated and served, as we do not have much time for cooking during the Retreat). Food is to be looked upon as medicine, support for our Zazen. All thought of luxury or poverty, good and bad, should be placed aside. We eat small, simple dishes ... in moderation. I would prepare a plain breakfast cereal, juice and perhaps tea for breakfast, and simple rice dishes, vegetable soups and steamed vegetables for lunch/dinner. Do not eat to fill oneself, and just what is healthful and necessary. Tea/Coffee and healthy snacks can be taken freely, in moderation, during break times.

CLICK ON THE FOLLOWING PICTURE TO PLAY:

RETREAT !! RETREAT!! (V) - Nature Calls

We continue preparations for our

'Treeleaf Two-Day Online Retreat'

scheduled for LIVE NETCAST over this coming weekend of DECEMBER 5 and 6, 2009 (and available in recorded form after that, for participation any time 'On Demand').

DETAILS CLICK HERE ...


Going to the toilet is nature, is life, is Practice, is Zazen. All the Buddhas and Ancestors had to pee and poo, and so do you. But how we do our duty makes all the difference!

Master Dogen devoted an entire chapter of Shobogenzo to latrine procedures ... and during our Retreat we should see going to the toilet as a sacred ritual. First, drop all thought of "clean" and "dirty" ... flush such discriminatory ideas away! However, even as we drop all idea of "clean" and "dirty", we try to stay clean (we are always working on several levels in Zen) ... so, if wearing a Rakusu, remove it and hang it outside the toilet room before entering. Then Gassho 3x (or, if you wish, do full prostrations 3x) toward the door of the toilet room and recite the following (by Ven. Thich Naht Hanh):


Defiled or immaculate,

increasing or decreasing--

these concepts exist only in our mind.

The reality of interbeing is unsurpassed.




Of course, maintain silence in the bog. No reading material and, while one need not assume the Full Lotus Posture on the commode, one should do one's business with the sense of stillness-in-motion and non-attaining that is Zazen. Go with with Flow!

Truly, peeing is only action in that moment, a perfect act complete unto itself ... it is not you peeing, or even the whole universe peeing in that instant (although it is that too) ... for 'tis Just Peeing. On exiting, bow again 3x to the toilet door and recite ...

Using the toilet I vow with all beings To eliminate defilement Removing greed, anger and ignorance.
Then be sure to wash you hands (there is something to recite for that as well) ... By the way, a similar ritual should be performed prior to entering the bath or shower. In that case, please recite ...

Bathing the body,

may all living beings

be clean in body and mind,

pure and shining within and without.

We will have similar recitals (called "Gatha") for use when brushing the teeth, washing the face and hands. They will be printed in our "Chant Book", available for download for use during the Retreat (27 Pages PDF).


PLEASE PRIINT THOSE OUT AND POST THEM AROUND YOUR BATHROOM!!


Press on arrow for 'play'

NOTE: IF YOU ARE HAVING TROUBLE TO SEE THE SCREEN OR START BUTTON,
PLEASE UPDATE FLASH. SEE HERE