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Thread: Beads

  1. #51
    Senior Member kirkmc's Avatar
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    Re: Beads

    So, in part because of this thread, I was browsing the intertubes looking at malas. As I said above, I'd like to get a wrist mala. But the sheer number of malas available, in every color, stone, wood and every other material is astounding. Yet another way to grasp and be attached! They go from a couple of bucks to more than a hundred dollars!

    I guess I shouldn't be surprised.

    But I still might buy one; a cheap one. As a reminder.

  2. #52

    Re: Beads

    I have a nice wrist mala which has a figure of Kannon and the chinese character for Buddha carved onto the beads.it serves no particular use, but sits on my wrist nonetheless.

  3. #53

    Re: Beads

    Taigu demonstrates another use for juzu: cut them up and toss them out!

    http://youtu.be/GIORv3Kebd0?t=2m59s[/video]]

  4. #54
    Senior Member kirkmc's Avatar
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    Re: Beads

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaishin
    Taigu demonstrates another use for juzu: cut them up and toss them out!

    http://youtu.be/GIORv3Kebd0?t=2m59s[/video]]
    Except he doesn't really cut them... :-)

  5. #55

    Re: Beads

    Quote Originally Posted by kirkmc
    Quote Originally Posted by Kaishin
    Taigu demonstrates another use for juzu: cut them up and toss them out!

    http://youtu.be/GIORv3Kebd0?t=2m59s[/video]]
    Except he doesn't really cut them... :-)
    Oh yes he does!!!

  6. #56

    Re: Beads

    ... thanks for all the info on Mala beads.

    Al - I thought the Tricycle article was thoughtful.

    Jundo - I found using the beads during sitting distracting - but I do occasionally use them for meditation on mantras at other times.
    Before I joined Tree Leaf my understanding of Buddhism was a total mish-mash. I still like chanting the Nembutsu because
    that's what I started with (minus the beads!) but I didn't know Pure Land from Soto Zen - and I'm still learning.

    Guess I'll find my niche sometime along 'the way'

    Gassho

    Willow

  7. #57

    Re: Beads

    Quote Originally Posted by willow

    Guess I'll find my niche sometime along 'the way'

    Gassho

    Willow
    Our ultimate "Niche" is the whole universe, reality, right here. 8)

    I couldn't resist to toss out that little Zen "fortune cookie"!

    Gassho, J

  8. #58

    Re: Beads

    Quote Originally Posted by AlanLa
    From Tricycle recently: Clark Strand traces the history of malas and how this ancient practice brings peace.
    http://www.tricycle.com/-practice/worry-beads?page=0,0
    Some interesting stuff in there.
    Thank you, Alan. The portion of that essay I would like to highlight is this, common ground for all these Practices ...

    We are not called upon as Buddhists to deny the world, and certainly not to escape from it. We are called to live with it, and to make our peace with all that is. In Buddhist terms, that peace is called Tathagata. The Thus Come One is enlightened as he is, not as he would wish himself to be. There is no escaping this. The world of worries we wish to escape from in the beginning of Buddhist practice is found to be enlightenment itself in the end. We don't understand this, of course, and so we keep striving for a distant, idealized kind of Buddhahood, only to reach its threshold and be turned back the way we came. In this way, we receive the teaching of the Buddha with every mala we say.

    If once combines this with Shikantaza's life of fully embracing, allowing, flowing with, being life as it is, just sitting, Still Sitting in movement or stillness, Wholly Holy Whole (even amid this life of many holes and tears) ... the most radical change of no longer wishing for change or needing change amid the every changing changeless ...

    ... then twisting twirling beeds which are each separate and One, thus come and thus go and the space too, is just Shikan-nenju!

    Gassho, J

  9. #59

    Re: Beads

    a lots of information about something rather unknown
    even everybody has them at home

    nice article

    thank you
    :P

  10. #60

    Re: Beads

    One more thing I came across about the unique metal ring on the Soto-style juzu represents the ringing of the bell at new year, when it is struck 108 times--any truth to that?

  11. #61

    Re: Beads

    I have seen those before, but they don't seem so common in America. I'd like to know more about them too.

  12. #62

    Re: Beads

    Quote Originally Posted by Kaishin
    One more thing I came across about the unique metal ring on the Soto-style juzu represents the ringing of the bell at new year, when it is struck 108 times--any truth to that?
    Well, it seems that the little metal ring is called the "108 ring". My educated guess (and nothing more) is that it is a mini-version of the rings found on the SHAKUJOU ??




    Here is some information on that ...

    A pilgrim's staff ... In Japan the shakuj usually consists of a wooden handle or pole topped with a metal finial with two sections, each with three rings, for a total of six rings, which represent the Six States of Existence -- the cycle of samsara, of suffering and reincarnation; in Japan, Jizo Bosatsu is often shown holding this staff. In India, the shakujou's metal rings were originally used by traveling priests to alert small creatures to keep them from accidentally being harmed by a priest when walking in the woods. It was also used to frighten away dangerous snakes or beasts that the priest might have encountered. The shakujou could also serve as a cane to help the priest walk. When begging, he rattled this staff to announce his arrival at the door or gate of a household without breaking the vow of silence. In Japan the shakujou is still used by monks, pilgrims, and practitioners of Shugendou ???, a school of Buddhism that teaches ascetic practices in the mountains (see En no gyouja ???). A yamabushi ?? or mountain priest may use it for magic or exorcism. In the Shingon ?? and Tendai ?? sects, the shakujou is used as a ritual object in special ceremonies. Some have short handles and are held when chanting.
    http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/p ... japan.html
    I cannot confirm a direct connection to ringing the bells at New Year and the meaning (called Joya-no-kane (????), but we joined in that last year and a little about the meaning of "108" in that tradition ...

    http://www.shambhalasun.com/sunspace/?p=13750

    Does that ring your bell? :lol:

    Gassho, Jundo

  13. #63
    Treeleaf Unsui Shokai's Avatar
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    Re: Beads

    Thanks Jundo, this is most interesting, I have a small replica of a SHAKUJOU which is a magnetic statue that stands on the dashboard of our car. It is a Kotsu-anzen-mamori (traffic safety charm) from Sanjusangendo http://bit.ly/bKUzSZ in Kyoto. I had never gone as far as to research the significance of its shape.
    Also, looking further down on the linked site; you read about Shuin-chou:
    Pilgrims usually carry a stamp book, which they typically purchase at the first temple or shrine along the circuit. The pilgrim pays the custodian at each temple or shrine to stamp/inscribe their book as proof of their visit. The covers of these books are often quite artistic.
    Well, if I may be allowed a little "show and Tell / Bring and Brag" :roll: ; I happen to have a (completed) Shuin-chou for the Thirty-four Temples at Chichbu (circa. 1994); as pictured here:
    and here:
    (Don't ask me how knew that if I kept this book it would come in handy one day!) :lol: :lol: 8)

    p.s. My wife has the car at work right now but, when she comes home I'll add a picture of the shakujou

  14. #64
    I know this is an old thread but I've made a regular practice of making Nenju. I grew up in a (somewhat) Catholic household and I was fascinated by the rosary. I would pray the rosary every day at one point. Just the combination of body, speech, and mind coming together felt almost magical. But leaving my Catholic faith, I put up my rosary and researched many different religions.

    When I re-discovered Zen, I found the Mala beads very curious and was surprised that they were used in the same way rosaries were but I did my research before getting one from what I call my local "voodoo" shop. They snapped, of course, and I restrung them in the Soto Zen style. They snapped again but this time in the grass so I couldn't find all the pieces. It was strange for a while going without my nenju, but I decided to make some one day with ebony, bone, and old palmwood beads and I've been using them for a while, wrapping them around my left wrist and occasionally using them for mantras. The Mantra I use is "sabbe satta sukhi hontu" or "may all beings be well". It's lovely to me and I usually use the beads humming it to myself as I wait places.

    These are the ones I've made for myself.

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/javiert...n/10969990046/

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/javiert...n/photostream/

    It has a tassel now but I haven't updated the pictures.

    Anyway, I love the act of making them and I've made ones for all of my immediate family for good luck.

    If anyone is interested in having one, PM me and I can give you one. Just let me know the details. :3

    Gassho,
    Javier

  15. #65
    As you let go of the idea of this and that, of you and me, as you open up to the reality of one taste, you may pick up boulders , mountains and rivers and cities, you may roll under your fingers planets and suns, give the wheels of galaxies another spin, you may stretch to beyond and find yourself right here,
    right now.

    Gassho

    T.
    Last edited by Taigu; 11-23-2013 at 01:35 AM.
    Taigu, teacher at Treeleaf Sangha, was born in 1964, started Zazen early and received Shukke Tokudo in 1983 at age 18 from Rev. Mokusho Zeisler of the Deshimaru Lineage. Received Dharma Transmission from Chodo Cross in 2002. Now resides in Osaka, Japan.

  16. #66
    Senior Member Clark's Avatar
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    Hi all

    I now have mala bead dukkha.

    But seriously thank you for an interesting informative discussion.

    Gassho
    C

  17. #67
    Quote Originally Posted by Taigu View Post
    As you let go of the idea of this and that, of you and me, as you open up to the reality of one taste, you way pick up boulders , mountains and rivers and cities, you may roll under your fingers planets and suns, give the wheels of galaxies another spin, you may stretch to beyond and find yourself right here,
    right now.
    Beautiful as always, Taigu - thank you!



    Gassho,

    Timo
    no thing needs to be added

  18. #68
    Quote Originally Posted by Taigu View Post
    As you let go of the idea of this and that, of you and me, as you open up to the reality of one taste, you way pick up boulders , mountains and rivers and cities, you may roll under your fingers planets and suns, give the wheels of galaxies another spin, you may stretch to beyond and find yourself right here,
    right now.

    Gassho

    T.
    Gorgeous teaching, Taigu. Thank you.

    Hi all

    I now have mala bead dukkha.

    But seriously thank you for an interesting informative discussion.

    Gassho
    C
    And Clark, I should mention that they're pay what you want. X3 Including the fantastic price of $0. I'll have them whether people want them or not and I'd love to give them to my dharma brothers and sisters and aunts and uncles and cousins. C:

    Gassho to all,

    Javier

  19. #69
    Thank you Taigu. Your poetic teaching resonates deeply in my bones. :-)

    Gassho, John

  20. #70
    Senior Member Heion's Avatar
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    I like the thread. I have a nice juzu I got from a Shingon temple in LA. I tried reading more into Shingon, but I didn't find much. Nevertheless, I still wear the juzu.

    Gassho

  21. #71
    Senior Member Joyo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    Hi all

    I now have mala bead dukkha.

    But seriously thank you for an interesting informative discussion.

    Gassho
    C
    Clark, I am thinking the exact same thing. Last summer my yoga instructor was selling mala beads that were made in India. Now I'm regretting that I did not buy some. I will definitely be on the lookout for some after reading about them here, great discussion.

    Gassho,
    Treena

  22. #72
    Senior Member Clark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bobman4671 View Post
    Gorgeous teaching, Taigu. Thank you.



    And Clark, I should mention that they're pay what you want. X3 Including the fantastic price of $0. I'll have them whether people want them or not and I'd love to give them to my dharma brothers and sisters and aunts and uncles and cousins. C:

    Gassho to all,

    Javier
    Thanks Javier

    All in good fun

    Gassho
    C

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