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Thread: Three minds, one way

  1. #1

    Three minds, one way

    As Okumura roshi reminds us:


    Magnanimous Mind is like an ocean or a mountain: calm and steady, yet accepting and nourishing countless beings and situations without differentiation. The ocean is serene because it accepts the many rivers without resisting.

    Nurturing Mind, literally "old mind", is akin to the attitude of a kindly grandmother or parent who delights in caring for others. It is the spirit of the bodhisattva, the fully mature person.

    Joyful Mind is the joy that comes from deep in our hearts even in the midst of difficulty. It arises from the insight of zazen, that we live together with all beings and are not separate.
    Let me comment a bit. Let me leave a few dirty traces here and there.

    Magnamious Mind is very spacious, vast and all pervading, ease is its nature, equanimity its body, it knows no bounds, in every situation or person met, the boundless is met; vast stillness and nothing sacred.

    Nurturing mind is compassionnate. Not because we have to be, not because we enjoy it, not out of duty. Just like a tiger leaping, it is manifested without any thoughts of helping, loving without any sweet intoxication to love. There isn't any idea of I and you in this.

    Joyful mind is the dance. It is the dynamic aspect of our original nature.


    These three minds are said to be at the core of our practice according to Dogen. If by any chance you have already noticed that ...well... it was missing to yours :cry: : this is a very good sign :lol: ( everytime we open our eyes on what is imperfect in our practice, our bad weeds, it is a good sign). Just cultivate the will and intention to display the thre minds, and forget about them plunging into shikantaza.

    Hope this helps.


    gassho



    Taigu

  2. #2

    Re: Three minds, one way

    Thank you Taigu!

    I really like your description of Nurturing mind. I think Nurturing mind should not be a duty, but arise naturally out of our practice.

    Gassho, Edward

  3. #3
    Senior Member AlanLa's Avatar
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    Re: Three minds, one way

    We already ARE the three minds, so nothing is missing, and yet that is the very reason we need to actively cultivate them into our practice.

    Gassho.....

  4. #4

    Re: Three minds, one way

    What is this right now?
    What can I do to help?

    Just a couple of questions to bring me back to reality.

    "accepting and nourishing countless beings and situations without differentiation"
    "the joy that comes from deep in our hearts even in the midst of difficulty"

    After being knocked around a little by adversity and difficulty , this joy remains in our hearts. That's truly amazing.

  5. #5

    Re: Three minds, one way

    Quote Originally Posted by Taigu
    Just cultivate the will and intention to display the three minds, and forget about them plunging into shikantaza.
    Thank you for this Taigu-sama!

    Quote Originally Posted by Rich
    Just a couple of questions to bring me back to reality.
    Always good to get back to what is just now! Easier said than done!
    Thank you Rich!

    gassho,
    Jinyu

  6. #6

    Re: Three minds, one way

    Excellent questions,Rich, truly excellent.

    thank you so much


    Taigu

  7. #7

    Re: Three minds, one way

    Gassho,

    It's one of, if not, my favorite teaching. Each mind is each of the others and each of the others is just yours.

    Noticing issues in our conduct can be hard, though, in my experience. It's very hard to laugh at yourself sometimes when you realize you haven't really been "on the ball", so to speak. Very much that western sense of guilt. Just moment, by moment, I suppose. We can't let ourselves forget that these minds must apply to ourselves. We must accept, nurture, and feel joy for ourselves just as much as others. Enough of the "I'm just not good enough, why can't I be more accepting, nurturing, joyful?" But that's just my struggle from time to time

    Thank you

    Gassho,
    Myoken

  8. #8

    Re: Three minds, one way

    Thank you Taigu, it does

  9. #9

    Re: Three minds, one way

    Three minds naturally understanding impermanence, looking for the happiness of all sentient beigns, and going beyond language distinctions.
    Three minds that keep the precepts instinctively, without having to be reminded to do so.
    Here they are in zazen, but when I look for them,plop, they are gone!

    Thank you Taigu

    Rimon

  10. #10
    Stephanie
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    Re: Three minds, one way

    That's a lot of minds to keep track of! I have enough trouble minding just one mind :wink:

  11. #11

    Re: Three minds, one way

    I found this really inspirational. Thank you Taigu Sensei.

    Gassho,

    Risho

  12. #12

    Re: Three minds, one way

    These three minds are a wonderful teaching. But like Taigu says, the tiger leaps when it is time to leap, no thought of "should I leap?", "who is leaping?", "why am I leaping?" The tiger simply leaps. Why do we sit? Because the meditation bell has rung. Why does the tiger leap? Because the leaping bell has rung.

    When the three minds stop being less than one, stop being more than one, stop being one altogether, the Precepts need not be followed - they are simply the way one lives. One need not be mindful - mindfulness is as automatic as breathing.

    Thank you Taigu.
    Many bows.

  13. #13

    Re: Three minds, one way

    Quote Originally Posted by JohnsonCM
    These three minds are a wonderful teaching. But like Taigu says, the tiger leaps when it is time to leap, no thought of "should I leap?", "who is leaping?", "why am I leaping?" The tiger simply leaps. Why do we sit? Because the meditation bell has rung. Why does the tiger leap? Because the leaping bell has rung.

    When the three minds stop being less than one, stop being more than one, stop being one altogether, the Precepts need not be followed - they are simply the way one lives. One need not be mindful - mindfulness is as automatic as breathing.

    Thank you Taigu.
    Many bows.
    And thank you.

    This was lovely.

  14. #14

    Re: Three minds, one way

    Excellent words, JohnsonCM.

    gassho

    Taigu

  15. #15

    Re: Three minds, one way

    What is the origin of this "sanshin" in Dogen's writings?

  16. #16

    Re: Three minds, one way

    No idea, Matto.
    And "No idea" is also a good start, don't you think?

    Anyway, anybody with an idea of some sort is really welcome.


    Thank you and gassho

    T.

  17. #17

    Re: Three minds, one way

    This topic rocks. Gassho, Taigu and everyone. You rock, too. :wink:

  18. #18
    Senior Member Amelia's Avatar
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    Re: Three minds, one way

    Thanks, Taigu. Earlier today, I thought about posting some thoughts on Big Mind, Joyful Mind and Kind Mind because of "How to Cook Your Life." The thoughts are already posted for me. _/_

  19. #19

    Re: Three minds, one way

    Quote Originally Posted by Taigu
    No idea, Matto.
    And "No idea" is also a good start, don't you think?

    Anyway, anybody with an idea of some sort is really welcome.


    Thank you and gassho

    T.
    My Curious Mind wondered, My Lazy Mind asked others, My Diligent Mind did some research

    Turns out it's from Shobogenzo Tenzokyokun, aka "Instructions to the Cook." Not sure if this is the only reference, or even the seminal one, but he talks a lot about sanshin or "three minds" near the end (from http://hcbss.stanford.edu/research/proj ... ation.html)

    In general, the various stewards and prefects, including the cook, should maintain a joyful mind, an elder's mind, and a great mind whenever they perform rituals or engage in work.

    So-called joyful mind is the spirit of happiness. You should consider that if you were born in a heaven, you would be attached to pleasures without cease and would not be able to arouse the thought of enlightenment. Practice would not be feasible. Even less would you be able to prepare meals as offerings to the three jewels! Among the myriad dharmas, the most revered and precious are the three jewels. The most superior things are the three jewels. Indra cannot compare. A wheel-turning king does not equal them. The Rules of Purity says, "Revered by the world, it is an excellent space outside [worldly] things; pure and detached, the assembly of monks is best."29 Now we have the good fortune to be born as human beings and to prepare the food that these three jewels receive and use. Is this not of great karmic significance? We should thus be very happy.

    Again, you should consider that if you were born into the realms of hell, hungry ghosts, animals, anti-gods, and the like, or born in circumstances where you suffered from one of the eight difficulties, even if you sought to cover yourself in the power of the sangha, your hands would naturally be unable to prepare pure meals as offerings to the three jewels. Relying on that painful physical form you would receive pain and be bound in body and mind. Now, in this life, you have already prepared those meals. How happy a birth! How happy a body! It is the good karmic result of kalpas vast and great. It is merit that cannot decay. When you prepare food and cook it you should do so with the aspiration of taking tens of thousands of births and concentrating them into this one day, this one time, that you may be able to bind together in good karmic result the bodies of millions of [past] births. A mind that contemplates and understands things in this way is a joyful mind. Truly, even if one takes on the body of a wheel-turning holy king, if one does not prepare meals as offerings to the three jewels, in the end it has no benefit. It is only of the nature of water, froth, bubbles, or flames.

    So-called elder's mind is the spirit of fathers and mothers. It is, for example, like a father and mother who dote on an only child: one's thoughts of the three jewels are like their concentration on that one child. Even if they are poor or desparate, they strongly love and nurture that single child. People who are outsiders cannot understand what their state of mind is like; they can only understand it when they themselves become fathers or mothers. Without regard for their own poverty or wealth, [parents] earnestly turn their thoughts toward raising their child. Without regard for whether they themselves are cold or hot, they shade the child or cover the child. We may regard this as affectionate thinking at its most intense. A person who arouses this spirit is fully conscious of it. A person who cultivates this spirit is one who truly awakens to it. Therefore, when [the cook] watches over water and watches over grain, in every case he should sustain the caring and warmth of child-rearing!

    The great teacher Shakyamuni, moreover, apportioned twenty years of his lifespan as a buddha to assist us in this age of the end of the dharma. What was his intention? It was simply that he valued the spirit of fathers and mothers. A tathâgata is utterly incapable of seeking any reward or seeking any riches.

    So-called great mind is, in its spirit, like a great mountain or a great sea: it has no partiality and no factionalism. Lifting an ounce, it does not consider it light; hefting a stone, it does not consider it heavy.30 Being drawn by the voices of spring, it does not wander into the swamp of spring. Although it sees the colors of autumn, it has nothing whatsoever of the spirit of autumn. It contrasts the four seasons against the backdrop of a single vista. It views pennyweights and ounces [of silver] within the context of a single system of measurement.31 As an emblem of this sameness, we can write the character "great". You should know the character "great". You should study the character "great". If the cook Jiashan had not studied the character "great", he would not have spontaneously laughed his single laugh and would not have saved Taiyuan.32 If Ch'an Master Guishan had not written the character "great", he could not have taken a stick of firewood and blown on it three times.33 If the Reverend Preceptor Dongshan had not known the character "great", he would not have been able to instruct the monk by raising "three pounds of hemp".34 You should know that the great teachers of old were alike in their study of the character "great" in connection with the diverse phenomena of this world. Now, too, there are those who freely make a great sound, expound the great meaning, complete the great matter, connect with great people, and accomplish karmic conditions of this one great matter. How could abbots, stewards, prefects, and monks in training entirely forget these three kinds of mind?!

  20. #20
    Senior Member Nindo's Avatar
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    Re: Three minds, one way

    Hey, thanks for digging this up, Matt!

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