Tugas Gunadarma Gunadarma Tutorial VB.NET Download OST Anime Soundtrack Anime Opening Anime Ending Anime OST Anime Japan Download Lagu Anime Jepang

Results 1 to 31 of 31

Thread: Liturgy as part of daily practice

  1. #1

    Liturgy as part of daily practice

    My exposure to Zen liturgy is limited to what I've read here in the Treeleaf chant book, the forums, and a book I purchased earlier this year called "Celebrating Everyday Life" by John Daido Loori.

    In any case, the book talks about how to integrate liturgy into daily lay practice. For instance, reciting "The Heart Sutra" followed by "The Heart Sutra Dedication". There is another service called "HEALING SERVICE DEDICATION", which involves reciting the "Enmei Jukku Kannon Gyo".

    I've been following the suggested liturgy pattern in that book but, since I'm part of this Sangha, I'd like to do what this Sangha does, e.g. chanting the translations of "The Four Bodhisattva Vows" used by treeleaf, etc.

    In any case, is it part of Treeleaf's tradition to chant the "Enmei Jukku Kannon Gyo", or recommend chanting "The Heart Sutra" followed by a dedication in daily practice?

    **EDIT
    I guess more generally, are there liturgy practices, in our tradition, to incorporate with daily practice?

  2. #2

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Hi Cyril,
    I can't answer your questions, but I have one of my own. Would you like to tell a bit more of how you use the book and what pattern it lays out?

    Gassho,
    em

  3. #3

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    The Heart Sutra and Heart Sutra dedication daily (I usually do this after morning zazen)

    After Morning Zazen
    - The Verse of the Vestment of Compassion
    - I will follow morning zazen with the heart sutra and a dedication (also Enmei Jukku Kannon Gyo if I want to think of those who need healing)

    After Evening Zazen
    - The 4 Bodhisattva Vows
    - Evening Gatha

    Before work
    - Work Gatha (this is the words "Gate! Gate! Paragate! Parasamgate! Bodhi Svaha!" 5 times followed by the words "Prajna Paramita" )

    Before meals
    - Meal Gatha

  4. #4

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Great question! Again, I'm sorry I cannot be of any help to your question but I have a small practice of my own. A silent liturgy of sorts. The gathas are amazing, but unless I carry around about 50 pocketmods full of them, I can never remember them! The lines get mixed up and bleh.... So my liturgy day goes like this (or at least I'm trying to make it to go like this).

    Morning Zazen:
    Gassho
    4 vows
    Working:
    Gassho
    Eating
    Gassho
    Evening zazen:
    Gassho
    Verse of Atonement

    I always fumble with words, making things too long or not saying enough. So instead, I have been trying to mark things with just a simple bow. A bow to the morning sun for being just as it is, a bow to my meal and all those who worked to provide it, and a bow to the stars. Maybe once I print out a pocketmod or two I'll get more liturgy in

    A gassho of deep respect to you and your commitment
    Taylor

  5. #5

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by cyril
    Before work
    - Work Gatha (this is the words "Gate! Gate! Paragate! Parasamgate! Bodhi Svaha!" 5 times followed by the words "Prajna Paramita" )
    Just curious...why is this a work gatha? :?:

  6. #6

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by chicanobudista
    Quote Originally Posted by cyril
    Before work
    - Work Gatha (this is the words "Gate! Gate! Paragate! Parasamgate! Bodhi Svaha!" 5 times followed by the words "Prajna Paramita" )
    Just curious...why is this a work gatha? :?:
    That's a good question, that I don't know the answer to. lol The book just says that doing the work gatha allows us to dedicate our work to all beings, to make us think about the work we do, how it involves more than just ourself and how right livelihood comes into play.

    Are there other work gathas?

  7. #7

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by cyril
    My exposure to Zen liturgy is limited to what I've read here in the Treeleaf chant book, the forums, and a book I purchased earlier this year called "Celebrating Everyday Life" by John Daido Loori.

    In any case, the book talks about how to integrate liturgy into daily lay practice. For instance, reciting "The Heart Sutra" followed by "The Heart Sutra Dedication". There is another service called "HEALING SERVICE DEDICATION", which involves reciting the "Enmei Jukku Kannon Gyo".

    I've been following the suggested liturgy pattern in that book but, since I'm part of this Sangha, I'd like to do what this Sangha does, e.g. chanting the translations of "The Four Bodhisattva Vows" used by treeleaf, etc.

    In any case, is it part of Treeleaf's tradition to chant the "Enmei Jukku Kannon Gyo", or recommend chanting "The Heart Sutra" followed by a dedication in daily practice?

    **EDIT
    I guess more generally, are there liturgy practices, in our tradition, to incorporate with daily practice?
    Thank you for mentioning Daido Loori's book, which I had not read (I just ordered it).

    We do not have a particular recommended daily liturgy here, although people may wish to incorporate various elements into their day to day lives. Remember ... IT IS ALL SACRED, every single step and breath and sneeze, even the most "ordinary" activity is anything but ordinary (I just did a little talk on the Buddha's tooth brushing) ...

    http://www.shambhalasun.com/sunspace/?p=17287

    We also had a recent thread in which people offered various Gatha ... some traditional, some very creative ... which serve as little lessons and reminders of that sacredness in various daily activities ...

    viewtopic.php?f=1&t=2115&start=0&st=0&sk=t&sd=a&hi lit=gatha

    Here is one from Al/Shinkai ...

    Grinding fresh afternoon coffee
    I vow with all beings
    to inhale each moment
    dropping likes and dislikes.
    At our weekly Zazenkai ...

    viewforum.php?f=11

    We have various Chants we recite (although now the Chant Book is in the process of being slightly revised... the new version should be out soon) ...

    viewtopic.php?f=11&t=2231

    These include the Heart Sutra, the Identity of Relative and Absolute (at the monthly long Zazenkai on the first Saturday of each month ... next Saturday, by the way! ), the Verse of Atonement and Four Vows. Any of those can be recited daily, and it is very nice to recite the Verse of Atonement and Four Vows daily.

    I certainly recommend the Metta Verses, which is a "Recommended Daily Practice" here at Treeleaf ... Please read about that here ...

    viewtopic.php?f=1&t=1199

    We recite the Enmei Jukku Kannon Gyo at our Annual Rohatsu Retreat ...

    http://www.treeleaf.org/sit-a-long/arch ... 09---.html

    although Taigu is now revising the wording of the translation of that we were using, which will be in our new Chant Book.

    The Verse of the Kesa is typically only recited by those who have received a Rakusu or full Kesa, when first placing it on each day. There is more on Rakusu ritual here ...

    viewtopic.php?p=32375#p32375

    I do not include the Evening Gatha here, sometimes recited as ...

    Let me respectfully remind you,
    Life and death are of supreme importance.
    Time swiftly passes by and opportunity is lost.
    Each of us should strive to awaken.
    Awaken! Take heed!
    Do not squander your lives....
    although when I do, I sometimes play with the wording (depends on the day) ... something like this (just my own fooling around):

    No me or you for reminding,
    Life and death are dreams of no importance.
    Never passing by, not a thing can be lost.
    Awaken, there is nothing to strive for.
    Awakened!
    We cannot squander our lives
    We also have a recommended Meal Chant to be recited before each meal, especially emphasized during our Ango 100 Day Practice Period (which will be coming up again very soon) ...

    viewtopic.php?p=26468#p26468

    Here is the Chant I suggested ...

    viewtopic.php?p=27118#p27118

    I am not too big for Dharani, such as the "Dharani to Avert Disaster" (Sho Sai Myo Kichijo Dharani), as I consider them mainly "hocus pocus" and silly. You can read a bit about that here ...

    viewtopic.php?p=35342#p35342

    viewtopic.php?p=35610#p35610

    Gassho (another kind of reminder of the Sacredness of this moment), Jundo

  8. #8

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Thank you so much for the thorough explanation, as always :mrgreen:

    I like your rendition of the Evening Gatha, particularly the part about "nothing to strive for".

    Gassho (this is my first Gassho in treeleaf. lol),

    Cyril

  9. #9

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Sorry to dig up an old-er thread but I had just finished Daido Roshi's book that Cyril referenced and wanted to ask a question or two. I have been trying to incorporate the liturgies into my daily practice and while I found the book somewhat useful, I was hoping to see if there was any further progress on the release of the Treeleaf Chant Book. Also, because I was curious what Jundo's opinion was of the book.

    Traditionally, I have been a bit of a minimalist when practicing (zafu + zabuton + me). While this is partly due to my continued perspective that sitting is enough. I have found that the liturgy and environment have been a welcomed additional to my practice. I have taken some of the suggestions from the book and, with the help of my wife begun to build a small altar as well. I have found, like with the incorporation of the meditation bowl/bell, it helps shift my mind into a place that is ready to sit. This is my practice.

    Out of curiosity, has anyone else moved from just sitting to incorporation of the liturgies & environments (read: altar)? What's your opinions on these. While I am not attached to the idea, and in fact have struggled with the guttural chanting at times (which is why I continue to do it). I ask because I have the mind that sitting is perfect in itself and the extras are just that...wondering if anyone has similar/differing opinions or perspectives?

    Thank you,

    Gassho,

    Shawn

  10. #10

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by shards
    Sorry to dig up an old-er thread but I had just finished Daido Roshi's book that Cyril referenced and wanted to ask a question or two. I have been trying to incorporate the liturgies into my daily practice and while I found the book somewhat useful, I was hoping to see if there was any further progress on the release of the Treeleaf Chant Book. Also, because I was curious what Jundo's opinion was of the book.

    Traditionally, I have been a bit of a minimalist when practicing (zafu + zabuton + me). While this is partly due to my continued perspective that sitting is enough. I have found that the liturgy and environment have been a welcomed additional to my practice. I have taken some of the suggestions from the book and, with the help of my wife begun to build a small altar as well. I have found, like with the incorporation of the meditation bowl/bell, it helps shift my mind into a place that is ready to sit. This is my practice.

    Out of curiosity, has anyone else moved from just sitting to incorporation of the liturgies & environments (read: altar)? What's your opinions on these. While I am not attached to the idea, and in fact have struggled with the guttural chanting at times (which is why I continue to do it). I ask because I have the mind that sitting is perfect in itself and the extras are just that...wondering if anyone has similar/differing opinions or perspectives?

    Thank you,

    Gassho,

    Shawn
    Hello Shawn,

    I have an altar at both my sewing table and my sitting area. Being of an overly simple nature, I use them in much the same way that I use a mala--when it touches one of the senses, it brings me back to here, now.

    As far as rites and rituals are concerned, I think it's like marriage--the act itself doesn't do anything but confirm what has already happened. Ritual, to me, communicates the importance of an event in a way that words cannot.

    But with or without fancy things, it's still just this life, this practice, right now, no?

    Metta,

    Perry

    P.S. One more thought -- Is there any special reason you chant gutturally? Every monk or priest I've been around outside the Gelug monks that live in my town chants in something close to their everyday voice. I'm just curious.

  11. #11

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    I've just recently ordered John Daido Loori's book myself (it should arrive next week). Being relatively new to practicing, I've just been winging it when it comes to the few improvised rituals I perform before and after sitting. Over the past few months, I've put together a small, somewhat minimalist altar and I do something that at least works for me...

    On certain days I'll watch one of the sit-a-longs beforehand. 8) Before actually sitting, I put on a playlist of mp3 files (which is mostly silence!), beginning with a recording of Honshirabe, a short, simple piece performed on the shakuhachi, played softly. I then light a candle at the altar, but no incense until afterward (for practical reasons: it burns my eyes too much while sitting with my eyes half open!).

    I then do a series of small bows. I first bow to the Buddha statue on the altar, then I bow in the direction of my cat (wherever he might be at the time), then I bow to a photo of my girlfriend (hanging on another wall), then I bow to my front door, then I bow to my zafu and finally one more bow to the Buddha statue before actually sitting.

    By this time, the shakuhachi piece is almost complete, giving me just enough to to settle down. The next mp3 track is just a bell to begin sitting, and then a long silent track (I usually use the 20 minute silent track, at least for now). Then there is the ending bell, another shakuhachi track plays (Kyorei) while I light the incense from the candle flame. After that, I go through the exact same series of bows before sitting.

    I also keep a very small bowl which I will put rainwater in, or rose petals, leaves-- which I place before the Buddha statue. This has its own significance to me as well.

    I'm sure this is totally not how it is normally "done" ops: but it seems to work for me, which is I suppose what really counts. Its just what feels natural.

    () josh

  12. #12

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    I have not incorporated an altar or much other ritual into my practice, but have considered doing so after reading Loori's book, among other things. I have always had an aversion to "idolatry," but I don't think I understood the significance of it before. When I would see people bowing, chanting, etc, it always struck me as blind worship. But now I see it--as Loori puts it--as making the invisible, visible.

    I am also curious about this mysterious yet-to-be-released new Treeleaf chant book

  13. #13
    Senior Member Amelia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    San Marcos, California
    Posts
    1,654

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    After having "been Wiccan" for some years, and then having tried out all sorts of other things, I am all "ritual-ed out!" I don't really hunger for that flair anymore.

    It's not that I don't see the good in rituals. I understand the nature of puja. I still do a few things here and there that are of a very ritualistic nature, but essentially, I see most rituals to be empty unless they are physically something to do with the experience.

  14. #14

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by Amelia
    I see most rituals to be empty unless they are physically something to do with the experience.
    Hi!

    I'm a bit classic on this but, I have an altar since my adolescence.
    I do take refuge everyday, just by bowing and reciting. I do chant at least once a day, at least the "kesa verse", usually I chant the Heart sutra and the "four vows" too and above all I bow! (most important ritual to me... with the kesa verse perhaps). It can seem very classic, but to be true I don't feel so. Comparing to Zen centers I know, I'm being very laxist and these ritual are very simple.

    I don't do ritual for the pleasure of ritual.... I mean by this that it is all related with the sitting of zazen. It is like an organic way I need to sit zazen daily. Chanting, bowing, kesa sewing, kinhin, ... it is all a way to establish zazen in my daily life.

    Of course, some days, I'm happy when I can chant the kesa verse and do 15minutes of zazen... but I try to give at least one hour a day on these practices that I see as just one.

    gassho,
    Jinyu

  15. #15
    Senior Member Amelia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    San Marcos, California
    Posts
    1,654

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by Jinyu
    Quote Originally Posted by Amelia
    I see most rituals to be empty unless they are physically something to do with the experience.
    I do chant at least once a day, at least the "kesa verse", usually I chant the Heart sutra and the "four vows" too and above all I bow! (most important ritual to me... with the kesa verse perhaps). It can seem very classic, but to be true I don't feel so.
    I do mantra and chanting, as well, and I enjoy them. I can also perceive some benefit, because I keep going back to it.

    Bowing whenever I take the time out of my day to cultivate some gratitude always feels natural and honest.

  16. #16

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by shards
    Sorry to dig up an old-er thread but I had just finished Daido Roshi's book that Cyril referenced and wanted to ask a question or two. I have been trying to incorporate the liturgies into my daily practice and while I found the book somewhat useful, I was hoping to see if there was any further progress on the release of the Treeleaf Chant Book. Also, because I was curious what Jundo's opinion was of the book.
    Hi,

    I will look back at Daido's book this week and report some impressions. Perhaps we could adapt a few more suggested "daily liturgy" practices here.

    However, I am generally one to suggest that each person take traditions and express them in ways which speak to one's heart.

    We did update the Chant Book, and released it for the December Retreat ... It can be downloaded here.

    http://www.treeleaf.org/sit-a-long/with ... 10---.html

    Not all the contents are needed for daily practice. It does contain the Heart Sutra (many people appreciate to recite that each day, in English or Japanese), the Verse of the Kesa (for those who have received Jukai) and various 'Gatha' for reminding us of the sacredness of all actions ... washing the face, brushing the teeth, going to the toilet. Gatha are discussed here ...

    http://www.treeleaf.org/sit-a-long/with ... 10---.html

    We have various suggested daily practices ... such as Metta recital ...

    viewtopic.php?f=1&t=1199

    We have also had some talks in the past about "What can be a Buddha Statue".

    Short answer: What is not a Buddha Statue?

    http://www.treeleaf.org/sit-a-long/with ... tatue.html

    We also have had some discussions of how to have an altar ... and, again, this is something for the heart. The Soto School in Japan has some instructions but (as discussed here), these are really too closely tailored to "Ancestor Worship" in Japan ...

    viewtopic.php?p=25929#p25929

    I will have some more to suggest in a few days after re-reading Daido's book.

    In any event, our daily Liturgy or Liturgies is ... Zazen.

    Gassho, J

  17. #17

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo
    We have also had some talks in the past about "What can be a Buddha Statue".

    Short answer: What is not a Buddha Statue?
    It's answers like this that make Treeleaf feel like home. Thanks Jundo.

    I got rid of my buddha statue a couple of months ago because it was making
    my wife uneasy. I didn't mind. I could have made a big deal about it. But
    hey, she's flesh and blood, and that statue, well... Now there is a betta fish
    named Claudia (I didn't choose the name) sitting where the buddha sat. She
    blows bubbles and looks at me when I feed her. Different form, same ol buddha.
    I'm content either way.

    gassho
    Greg

  18. #18

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by ghop
    Now there is a betta fish
    named Claudia (I didn't choose the name) sitting where the buddha sat. She
    blows bubbles and looks at me when I feed her. Different form, same ol buddha.
    I'm content either way.
    Made my day! :mrgreen:

  19. #19

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Hello peeps,
    Like Jinyu I have kept an altar since teenage days, I minded to go through old photos and see how it has evolved over the years. I have a routine based mainly on OBC liturgy, I am trying to learn the Treeleaf translation of the Kesa verse in time for Jukai, i have used the OBC for so long now. The meaning is the same but one likes to do in Rome...etc. I look forward to seeing a copy of Loori's book on this and Jundo's take on it.

    Gassho

    Joe

  20. #20

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by JoeTurner
    I am trying to learn the Treeleaf translation of the Kesa verse in time for Jukai, i have used the OBC for so long now.
    Each is an English translation and re-expression from the original Japanese, which is based on the original Chinese ... which may be based somewhere down the road on Sanskrit, then Pali ...

    In other words, please use the version that speaks to you.

    Gassho, J

  21. #21

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo

    However, I am generally one to suggest that each person take traditions and express them in ways which speak to one's heart.
    This is some advice that I really heed a lot during practice, and it inspires me. I find, personally, when I jump on the bandwagon of something (whatever it is) in the early stages of my discovering that thing, I will use that object to satisfy my ego's desire to be distracted. I have a big problem with boredom in my life, probably because I have an addictive personality.

    My first few months of zazen were like this. My practice is a lot different now. I'm no longer so enamored by my zafu/zabuton or my buddha statue, etc. The bs has settled and now practice begins. That's not to say that I don't appreciate those elements to zen. I really do love it, I love the art, the writing, a lot of stuff about it, but I'm no longer as caught up in it, and I don't romanticize it as much.

    In this vein, my liturgy practice has changed too. Instead of being so strict (and never really living up to some arbitrary rules I put down; i do that a lot too), I now chant the four vows and verse of atonement pretty regularly after each sitting; that's what we do here during zazenkai, so as a sangha member I really like to do with the sangha's doing. similarly I think sewing is a part of liturgy as well. Boy, I'd never thought I'd say that But I really think the liturgy I do, while personal, should also reflect what my teacher's are sharing with us in their practices.

    Gassho Jundo and Taigu

    In any case (and enough kissing butt. hahahah), Taigu mentioned (and I'll probably misquote it) take it easy in our practice. There may be a saying and I don't know who said this but the candle that burns brightest has the shortest life. What I mean is that how I practice now is to make it part of my daily life... nothing special. If I make it special it's separate from me, and I don't think that's what this is. If I stay consistent and don't overdo it, then I'll maintain my practice. If I push too hard, I'll burn out and this will just be another phase of my life; something I tried.

    But that is not the Way at least from what I've learned. We share in a practice that's come down from generations, and so to honor it I stay consistent.

    Ok I'm done rambling. lol

    Gassho,

    Cyril

  22. #22

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Cyril,

    I identify a lot with what you wrote above, and I think you've actually helped to solidify some concerns I have about my own practice.

    Thanks for sharing,
    Matt

  23. #23

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo
    Each is an English translation and re-expression from the original Japanese, which is based on the original Chinese ... which may be based somewhere down the road on Sanskrit, then Pali ...

    In other words, please use the version that speaks to you.

    Gassho, J
    Could you please tell us the original source (author, sutra?) of the Verse of the Kesa? My googlefu is failing me on this. It is a particular favorite of mine.

    As a side note, I own the Zen Mountain Monastery Liturgy Manual and have found it to be a good purchase. I read sections of it almost every day.

  24. #24

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by cyril
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo

    However, I am generally one to suggest that each person take traditions and express them in ways which speak to one's heart.
    This is some advice that I really heed a lot during practice, and it inspires me. I find, personally, when I jump on the bandwagon of something (whatever it is) in the early stages of my discovering that thing, I will use that object to satisfy my ego's desire to be distracted. I have a big problem with boredom in my life, probably because I have an addictive personality.

    My first few months of zazen were like this. My practice is a lot different now. I'm no longer so enamored by my zafu/zabuton or my buddha statue, etc. The bs has settled and now practice begins. That's not to say that I don't appreciate those elements to zen. I really do love it, I love the art, the writing, a lot of stuff about it, but I'm no longer as caught up in it, and I don't romanticize it as much.

    In this vein, my liturgy practice has changed too. Instead of being so strict (and never really living up to some arbitrary rules I put down; i do that a lot too), I now chant the four vows and verse of atonement pretty regularly after each sitting; that's what we do here during zazenkai, so as a sangha member I really like to do with the sangha's doing. similarly I think sewing is a part of liturgy as well. Boy, I'd never thought I'd say that But I really think the liturgy I do, while personal, should also reflect what my teacher's are sharing with us in their practices.

    Gassho Jundo and Taigu

    In any case (and enough kissing butt. hahahah), Taigu mentioned (and I'll probably misquote it) take it easy in our practice. There may be a saying and I don't know who said this but the candle that burns brightest has the shortest life. What I mean is that how I practice now is to make it part of my daily life... nothing special. If I make it special it's separate from me, and I don't think that's what this is. If I stay consistent and don't overdo it, then I'll maintain my practice. If I push too hard, I'll burn out and this will just be another phase of my life; something I tried.

    But that is not the Way at least from what I've learned. We share in a practice that's come down from generations, and so to honor it I stay consistent.

    Ok I'm done rambling. lol

    Gassho,

    Cyril
    Cyril,

    Wonderful, wonderful.

    Grapes turn with time into fine, mellow wine ... a seedling into a great tree ... an infatuation into a timeless love affair ... an amateur into a skilled craftsman ...

    Our way is a 'way of life' ... all time and space just living life ... you just living life ...

    Deep Bows, Jundo

  25. #25

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    GASSHO

    Thank you for this thread! I am often lost when it comes to liturgy, and so it is nice to see that I'm not doing anything "wrong" by listening to my intuition by not adding a special liturgy to my daily practice simply for the sake of its addition; to fill a spot in other words. And another thank you to everyone for your points of view/knowledge, it is very much appeciated.

    gassho

    Jonathan

  26. #26

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Hi all,

    Yes Cyril, the idea is that I met people who were doing everything so well and so diligently...just to stop a couple of years down the line. It is important to cultivate a very quiet, steady, ordinary way. To let practice make the ordinary shine and reveal the ground of this extraordinary practice as nothing special.

    gassho


    Taigu

  27. #27

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Glad I stopped in to read. Thank you all very very much.

    The Candle that flamed out a few times in life already,
    Taylor

  28. #28
    Senior Member Amelia's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    San Marcos, California
    Posts
    1,654

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by Taigu
    It is important to cultivate a very quiet, steady, ordinary way. To let practice makes the ordinary shine and reveal the ground of this extraordinary practice as nothing special.
    Excellent advice! Thank you, Taigu. _/_

  29. #29

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Well, upon consultation with Taigu, I have put together a thread of 'Official' Treeleaf Recommended 'AT HOME' Liturgy!

    Please have a look.

    viewtopic.php?f=1&t=3308

    I also will highly recommend there the book by Daido Roshi which was posted at the start of this thread ... "Celebrating Everyday Life" ... one of the wisest books I have read in ages ...

    If you wish, we can continue the discussion here or there.

    Gassho, Jundo

  30. #30
    Senior Member Hogo's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    LaCenter, WA.
    Posts
    483

    Re: Liturgy as part of daily practice

    Quote Originally Posted by Taigu
    Hi all,

    Yes Cyril, the idea is that I met people who were doing everything so well and so diligently...just to stop a couple of years down the line. It is important to cultivate a very quiet, steady, ordinary way. To let practice make the ordinary shine and reveal the ground of this extraordinary practice as nothing special.

    gassho


    Taigu
    Thank you.
    Gassho.

  31. #31
    I found the following website to be a great resource. Very well put together and accurate too.

    http://www.shinmeidokujoh.blogspot.com/

    Who ever put that together went through almost as much work as Jundo and Taigu.


    When I first really started sitting on a consistent and earnest basis earlier this year, I was still a bit spiritually shattered from my previous experiences. This led to a discontentment with general zen buddhist liturgies out there circulating on the web.

    If only I had found Treeleaf sooner

    So I went in search of prayers to chant before and after I sit.

    I found that blog and put together my own home liturgy.

    Studying various sources around the net ( a dangerous endeavor indeed LOL) I've always found the Zen attitude toward prayers, shrines, and altars a bit curious.

    I feel like my practice is enhanced by simple chants of homage in the three jewels, varying sutras I feel connected with, and dedicating my merits.

    Maybe I'll abandon this boat when I reach the other shore. Until then, I need oars


Similar Threads

  1. RECOMMENDED DAILY Nurturing Seeds PRACTICE
    By Jundo in forum TREELEAF COMMUNITY: Topics about Zazen, Zen, Buddhism & MORE ZAZEN!
    Replies: 23
    Last Post: 08-22-2014, 07:16 PM
  2. RECOMMENDED DAILY Metta PRACTICE
    By Jundo in forum TREELEAF COMMUNITY: Topics about Zazen, Zen, Buddhism & MORE ZAZEN!
    Replies: 19
    Last Post: 08-05-2014, 02:32 AM
  3. Advice: Adding more practice to daily life
    By Jen in forum TREELEAF COMMUNITY: Topics about Zazen, Zen, Buddhism & MORE ZAZEN!
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 07-13-2010, 08:56 AM
  4. Practice in Daily Life
    By JohnsonCM in forum TREELEAF COMMUNITY: Topics about Zazen, Zen, Buddhism & MORE ZAZEN!
    Replies: 22
    Last Post: 07-09-2010, 06:38 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •