Tugas Gunadarma Gunadarma Tutorial VB.NET Download OST Anime Soundtrack Anime Opening Anime Ending Anime OST Anime Japan Download Lagu Anime Jepang

Results 1 to 10 of 10

Thread: Soto Zen crest

  1. #1

    Soto Zen crest

    What's up with this "Soto Zen crest"?



    Just curious who designed it, where it's used, etc. Besides on t-shirts, I mean, which seems to be the only thing I can find with my googlefu. Does it really have anything to do with Soto Zen?

  2. #2

    Re: Soto Zen crest

    From where in internet did you find it? :?:

  3. #3

    Re: Soto Zen crest

    It is not the "Soto Zen" crest. It is the crest for Eihei-ji.

    The crest for Eiheiji, at the right below, is a 'gentian' flower, and Sojiji at the left below is a pauloenia. (I do not know why those particular flowers, and am not much of a flower man. I heard once that there was some indirect connection to the crests of Samurai families of the past who may have been sponsors. All I can say is that every group in Japan has its own flower, the Imperial Family being the Chrysanthemum.).

    The two crests combined, as here, is the current emblem of the Soto school.




    Every religious group, university, club, company or family has a crest in Japan, often depicting a particular flower. Here are some :

    http://www.hari-kamon.com/plant/Page/RINDOU/index.html

    Eihei-ji and Soji-ji are the two head temples of Soto Shu in Japan ... for reasons of history In a nutshell ... Eiheiji is the monastery of Dogen. Soji-ji is the monastery of Keizan, the 3rd Patriarch in Japan. They wrestled ... sometimes quite spitefully, although never violently ... for about 500 years over which would be the top dog in Japan. In the late 19th century, they finally reached a compromise, and basically take turns, e.g., appointing the titular head of Soto-shu from each one in turn.

    Gassho, Jundo
    Last edited by Jundo; 09-29-2013 at 04:00 PM.

  4. #4

    Re: Soto Zen crest

    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo
    All I can say is that every group in Japan has its own flower, the Imperial Family being the Chrysanthemum.).
    Every religious group, university, club, company or family has a crest in Japan, often depicting a particular flower.
    Hi.

    what is our crest?

    Mtfbwy
    Fugen

  5. #5

    Re: Soto Zen crest

    Very cool and educational explanation Jundo, thank you. I'm fascinated by symbols/logos.

  6. #6
    Treeleaf Unsui Myozan Kodo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    2,102

    Re: Soto Zen crest

    Hi all,

    And what of this...



    ...the 'broken pine needle' on our Soto Rakusu? Does anyone know its meaning or origin? I think Rinzai have a triangular symbol on theirs. I've always wondered what it meant...

    I'm sure Jundo and Taigu have been asked this one before. Apologies if I'm asking a previously responded to question...

    Gassho,

    Soen

  7. #7

    Re: Soto Zen crest

    Quote Originally Posted by soendoshin
    Hi all,

    And what of this...



    ...the 'broken pine needle' on our Soto Rakusu? Does anyone know its meaning or origin? I think Rinzai have a triangular symbol on theirs. I've always wondered what it meant...

    I'm sure Jundo and Taigu have been asked this one before. Apologies if I'm asking a previously responded to question...

    Gassho,

    Soen
    Yes, this came up during our preparations for the Jukai ... Here is the post ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Martin
    Could someone please expalin why the pattern we sewed on the back of the bit of the Rakusu that goes round your neck is a pine needle? It's probably just me (or maybe it's the pines we have in Norfolk!) but I can't see it. I faithfully sewed it, but to me it just looks like one of those shapes we used to get in maths exams when one had to work out the various angles and measurements etc (which I couldn't do either). If this has been explained before, apologies.

    Gassho

    Martin
    Well, I found this drawing of casuarina needles ... and it seems not so far off ...



    John Tarrant Roshi wrote this explanation ...

    On the back of the rakusu are crossed casuarina needlesneedles from
    an ancient Buddhist treesignfying that this is a mountain path,
    signifying that it takes you deep into the journey into the true self.
    As Rilke said, so that we walk into the silence, for hours meeting
    no-one. Also the needles are the green shoots of the Way, the manner
    in which the Way will spring up like dandelions in a pavement in the
    city. Somewhere, no matter what state you are in, you can always find
    a little green trace of it. There are two needles crossed with each
    other. Every time you are caught in an opposite, at bottom there is
    always some unity there, if you can find it. Theres always some way
    to hold the two together. And that is the enlightened task. So that
    we can find the true action.
    ftp://coombs.anu.edu.au/coombspapers/ot ... nter-b.txt
    viewtopic.php?p=18574#p18574

  8. #8
    Treeleaf Unsui Myozan Kodo's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2010
    Location
    Dublin, Ireland
    Posts
    2,102

    Re: Soto Zen crest

    Thanks for that Jundo. It is a nice explanation.
    Deep bows,
    Soen

  9. #9

    Re: Soto Zen crest

    Googling again to clarify about both crest, I found a good post at an excellent forum....

    Treeleaf!

    Rakusu, Kesa?
    :mrgreen:

  10. #10
    Senior Member Nenka's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2010
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    1,009

    Re: Soto Zen crest

    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo
    It is not the "Soto Zen" crest. It is the crest for Eihei-ji.

    The crest for Eiheiji, at the right below, is a 'gentian' flower, and Sojiji at the left below is a pauloenia. (I do not know why those particular flowers, and am not much of a flower man. I heard once that there was some indirect connection to the crests of Samurai families of the past who may have been sponsors. All I can say is that every group in Japan has its own flower, the Imperial Family being the Chrysanthemum.).
    I have an interesting (I hope ) aside on the pawlonia (apparently also called the kiri or empress tree) from my trusty Dover Thrift Edition of The Classic Tradition of Haiku, an Anthology which uses said crest as its frontispiece:

    "The large purple flowers in early autumn are deeply associated with haiku because the three prongs hold 5, 7 and 5 buds respectively."

    As the footnote is about this poem:

    hitoha chiru / totsu hitoha chiru / kaze no ue

    A leaf falls;
    Totsu! a leaf falls,
    on the wind.

    (--Hattori Ransetsu, trans. Bill Higginson)

    it also says "Totsu is an exclamation supposedly uttered when a Zen student achieves enlightenment. The sound also imitates the dry crackle the pawlonia leaf makes as it scratches the ground upon falling."

    Totsu? That's a new one to me.

Similar Threads

  1. Soto Texts
    By Saijun in forum TREELEAF COMMUNITY: Topics about Zazen, Zen, Buddhism & MORE ZAZEN!
    Replies: 14
    Last Post: 12-21-2010, 08:33 PM
  2. Etymology, nomenclature etc. in Soto Zen
    By anista in forum TREELEAF COMMUNITY: Topics about Zazen, Zen, Buddhism & MORE ZAZEN!
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 06-14-2010, 05:43 AM
  3. Soto Reform Movement
    By chicanobudista in forum TREELEAF COMMUNITY: Topics about Zazen, Zen, Buddhism & MORE ZAZEN!
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-09-2010, 02:00 AM
  4. Soto and Rinzai
    By Shui_Di in forum TREELEAF COMMUNITY: Topics about Zazen, Zen, Buddhism & MORE ZAZEN!
    Replies: 56
    Last Post: 03-27-2009, 08:32 PM
  5. OBC Soto?
    By Skye in forum TREELEAF COMMUNITY: Topics about Zazen, Zen, Buddhism & MORE ZAZEN!
    Replies: 10
    Last Post: 05-06-2008, 03:32 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •