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Thread: February 6, 2010 - OUR MONTHLY 4-hour ZAZENKAI

  1. #1

    February 6, 2010 - OUR MONTHLY 4-hour ZAZENKAI

    Dear All,

    Please 'sit-a-long' with our FEBRUARY MONTHLY 4-hour ZAZENKAI, netcast LIVE from 9pm to 1am Japan time Saturday (that is New York 7am to 11am, Los Angeles 4am to 8am, London noon to 4pm and Paris 1pm to 5pm, SATURDAY) ... and visible at the following link during those times ...

    LIVE ZAZENKAI NETCAST at USTREAM:

    http://www.ustream.tv/channel/sit-a-long-with-jundo

    But FEAR NOT if not possible for you to join 'live' in your location at those times, as the entire sitting is recorded in 'REAL TIME' and available for full participation 'ON DEMAND' at ANY TIME after that, no different from the 'live' sitting . Just click then on the links below:

    THE 'REAL TIME, ANY TIME' recorded version is divided into 2 parts as follows (click on the blue links) :

    00:00 - 00:50 CEREMONY (HEART SUTRA / SANDOKAI IN ENGLISH) & ZAZEN
    00:50 - 01:00 KINHIN
    01:00 - 01:40 ZAZEN
    01:40 - 01:50 KINHIN

    ZAZENKAI PART I LINK

    http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/4495250

    01:50 - 02:30 DHARMA TALK & ZAZEN
    02:30 - 02:40 KINHIN
    02:40 - 03:20 ZAZEN
    03:20 - 03:30 KINHIN
    03:30 - 04:00 METTA CHANT & ZAZEN, VERSE OF ATONEMENT, FOUR VOWS, & CLOSING

    ZAZENKAI PART 2 LINK

    http://www.ustream.tv/recorded/4497118
    Our Zazenkai consists of our chanting the 'Heart Sutra' and the 'Identity of Relative and Absolute (Sandokai)' in English (please download our Chant Book at the link below), some full floor prostrations (please follow along with me ... or a simple Gassho can be substituted if you wish), a little talk by me ... and we close with the 'Metta Chant', followed at the end with the 'Verse of Atonement' and 'The Four Vows'. Oh, and lots and lots of Zazen and walkin' Kinhin in between!

    Please download and print out the Chant Book (PDF) at the following link:

    viewtopic.php?f=11&t=2231

    I STRONGLY SUGGEST THAT YOU POSITION YOUR ZAFU ON THE FLOOR IN A PLACE WHERE YOU ARE NOT STARING DIRECTLY AT THE COMPUTER SCREEN, BUT CAN GLANCE OVER AND SEE THE SCREEN WHEN NECESSARY. YOUR ZAFU SHOULD ALSO BE IN A POSITION WHERE YOU CAN SEE THE COMPUTER SCREEN WHILE STANDING IN FRONT OF THE ZAFU FOR THE CEREMONIES, AND HAVE ROOM FOR BOWING AND KINHIN.

    ALSO, REMEMBER TO SET YOUR COMPUTER (& SCREEN SAVER) SO THAT IT DOES NOT SHUT OFF DURING THE 4 HOURS.


    I hope you will join us ... an open Zafu is waiting. When we drop all thought of 'here' 'there' 'now' 'then' ... we are sitting all together!

    Gassho, Jundo

  2. #2

    Re: February 6, 2010 - OUR MONTHLY 4-hour ZAZENKAI

    Here is information on the wonderful place I visited today, mentioned in my talk during the Zazenkai ...

    Dialogue-in-the-Dark

    Idea & Concept ›

    The idea is simple: In complete darkness, blind individuals lead small groups of guests through a series of ordinary situations that are suddenly experienced extraordinarily, without eyesight.

    Role reversal takes place as sighted people lose familiar routines while blind people facilitate mobility and confidence, becoming ambassadors of a culture devoid of images. Everyone shares an unforgettable experience. Visitors report enhanced perception and communication, a greater sense of empathy and solidarity, gratitude for their senses, and respect for those who see the world differently.

    The mission of Dialogue in the Dark is to facilitate social inclusion of marginalized people on a global basis.

    Our goal is to raise awareness and create tolerance for Otherness in the general public, thereby overcoming barriers between “us” and “them”. We create jobs for disadvantaged people by turning deficits into potentials and thereby strengthen the self-esteem of individuals who are typically under-valued.

    The foundation of Dialogue in the Dark was laid in 1986. While working as a journalist and documentalist for a German broadcasting corporation, Andreas Heinecke was charged with developing a rehabilitation programme for a colleague who had lost his eyesight in an automobile accident.

    Through their conversations-a crash course in diversity training – Andreas made several discoveries. He witnessed the extent of society’s prejudice and recognised that, like his own trepidation, it grew mostly out of the ignorance that results from lack of contact with people who are “different”. Andreas became fascinated by non-visual perception, and found that meeting blind people fundamentally enhanced his view of human nature. He realised what an enriching opportunity it would be for all sighted people to have the chance to connect with blind people. Finally, he saw that darkness would be the ideal context for such encounters.

    http://www.dialogue-in-the-dark.com/
    ... and the Koan I mentioned ...

    Blow Out the Candle

    Tokusan [Te-shan] was studying Zen under Ryutan [Lung-t'an]. One night he came to Ryutan and asked many questions. The teacher said: `The night is getting old. Why don't you retire?'

    So Tukusan bowed and opened the screen to go out, observing: `It is very dark outside.'

    Ryutan offered Tokusan a lighted candle to find his way. Just as Tokusan received it, Ryutan blew it out. At that moment the mind of Tokusan was opened.

    `What have you attained?' asked Ryutan.

    `From now on,' said Tokusan, `I will not doubt the teacher's words.'

    The next day Ryutan told the monks at his lecture: `I see one monk among you. His teeth are like the sword tree, his mouth is like the blood bowl. If you hit him hard with a big stick, he will not even so much as look back at you. Someday he will mount the highest peak and carry my teaching there.'

    On that day, in front of the lecture hall, Tokusan burned to ashes his commentaries on the sutras. He said: `However abstruse the teachings are, in comparison with this enlightenment they are like a single hair to the great sky. However profound the complicated knowledge of the world, compared to this enlightenment it is like one drop of water to the great ocean.' Then he left the monastry.

    Mumon's Comment: When Tokusan was in his own country he was not satisfied with Zen although he had heard about it. He thought: `Those Southern monks say they can teach Dharma outside of the sutras. They are all wrong. I must teach them.' So he travelled south. He happened to stop near Ryutan's monastery for refreshments. An old woman who was there asked him: `What are you carrying so heavily?'

    Tokusan replied: `This is a commentary I have made on the Diamond Sutra after many years of work.'

    The old woman said: `I read that sutra which says: "The past mind cannot be held, the present mind cannot be held." You wish some tea and refreshments. Which mind do you propose to use for them?'

    Tokusan was as though dumb. Finally he asked the woman: `Do you know of any good teacher around here?'

    The old woman referred him to Ryutan, not more than five miles away. So he went to Ryutan in all humility, quite different from when he had started his journey. Ryutan in turn was so kind he forgot his own dignity. It was like pouring muddy water over a drunken man to sober him. After all, it was an unnecessary comedy.

    A hundred hearings cannot surpass one seeing,
    But after you see the teacher, that once glance cannot surpass a hundred hearings.
    His nose was very high
    But he was blind after all.

    Mumonkan [The Gateless Gate] 28
    And, of course, the famous parable of the elephant ... From the Tittha Sutta ...

    I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying near Savatthi, in Jeta's Grove, Anathapindika's monastery. Now at that time there were many priests, contemplatives, and wanderers of various sects living around Savatthi with differing views, differing opinions, differing beliefs, dependent for support on their differing views. Some of the priests and contemplatives held this view, this doctrine: "The cosmos is eternal. Only this is true; anything otherwise is worthless."

    Some of the priests and contemplatives held this view, this doctrine: "The cosmos is not eternal"... "The cosmos is finite"... "The cosmos is infinite"... "The soul and the body are the same"... "The soul is one thing and the body another"... "After death a Tathagata exists"... "After death a Tathagata does not exist"... "After death a Tathagata both does and does not exist"... "After death a Tathagata neither does nor does not exist. Only this is true; anything otherwise is worthless."

    And they lived arguing, quarreling, and disputing, wounding one another with weapons of the mouth, saying, "The Dhamma is like this, it's not like that. The Dhamma's not like that, it's like this."

    Then in the early morning, a large number of monks, having put on their robes and carrying their bowls and outer robes, went into Savatthi for alms. Having gone for alms in Savatthi, after the meal, returning from their alms round, they went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As they were sitting there, they said to the Blessed One: "Lord, there are many priests, contemplatives, and wanderers of various sects living around Savatthi with differing views, differing opinions, differing beliefs, dependent for support on their differing views... and they live arguing, quarreling, and disputing, wounding one another with weapons of the mouth, saying, 'The Dhamma is like this, it's not like that. The Dhamma's not like that, it's like this.'"

    "Monks, the wanderers of other sects are blind and eyeless. They don't know what is beneficial and what is harmful. They don't know what is the Dhamma and what is non-Dhamma. Not knowing what is beneficial and what is harmful, not knowing what is Dhamma and what is non-Dhamma, they live arguing, quarreling, and disputing, wounding one another with weapons of the mouth, saying, 'The Dhamma is like this, it's not like that. The Dhamma's not like that, it's like this.'

    "Once, in this same Savatthi, there was a certain king who said to a certain man, 'Gather together all the people in Savatthi who have been blind from birth.'"

    "'As you say, your majesty,' the man replied and, rounding up all the people in Savatthi who had been blind from birth, he went to the king and on arrival said, 'Your majesty, the people in Savatthi who have been blind from birth have been gathered together.'

    "'Very well then, show the blind people an elephant.'

    "'As you say, your majesty,' the man replied and he showed the blind people an elephant. To some of the blind people he showed the head of the elephant, saying, 'This, blind people, is what an elephant is like.' To some of them he showed an ear of the elephant, saying, 'This, blind people, is what an elephant is like.' To some of them he showed a tusk... the trunk... the body... a foot... the hindquarters... the tail... the tuft at the end of the tail, saying, 'This, blind people, is what an elephant is like.'

    "Then, having shown the blind people the elephant, the man went to the king and on arrival said, 'Your majesty, the blind people have seen the elephant. May your majesty do what you think it is now time to do.'

    "Then the king went to the blind people and on arrival asked them, 'Blind people, have you seen the elephant?'

    "'Yes, your majesty. We have seen the elephant.'

    "'Now tell me, blind people, what the elephant is like.'

    "The blind people who had been shown the head of the elephant replied, 'The elephant, your majesty, is just like a water jar.'

    "Those who had been shown the ear of the elephant replied, 'The elephant, your majesty, is just like a winnowing basket.'

    "Those who had been shown the tusk of the elephant replied, 'The elephant, your majesty, is just like an iron rod.'

    "Those who had been shown the trunk of the elephant replied, 'The elephant, your majesty, is just like the pole of a plow.'

    "Those who had been shown the body of the elephant replied, 'The elephant, your majesty, is just like a granary.'

    "Those who had been shown the foot of the elephant replied, 'The elephant, your majesty, is just like a post.'

    "Those who had been shown the hindquarters of the elephant replied, 'The elephant, your majesty, is just like a mortar.'

    "Those who had been shown the tail of the elephant replied, 'The elephant, your majesty, is just like a pestle.'

    "Those who had been shown the tuft at the end of the tail of the elephant replied, 'The elephant, your majesty, is just like a broom.'

    "Saying, 'The elephant is like this, it's not like that. The elephant's not like that, it's like this,' they struck one another with their fists. That gratified the king.

    "In the same way, monks, the wanderers of other sects are blind and eyeless. They don't know what is beneficial and what is harmful. They don't know what is the Dhamma and what is non-Dhamma. Not knowing what is beneficial and what is harmful, not knowing what is Dhamma and what is non-Dhamma, they live arguing, quarreling, and disputing, wounding one another with weapons of the mouth, saying, 'The Dhamma is like this, it's not like that. The Dhamma's not like that, it's like this.'"

    Then, on realizing the significance of that, the Blessed One on that occasion exclaimed:
    Some of these so-called priests & contemplatives are attached. They quarrel & fight — people seeing one side.


  3. #3
    Treeleaf Unsui Dosho's Avatar
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    Re: February 6, 2010 - OUR MONTHLY 4-hour ZAZENKAI

    Thank you Jundo.

    Although, I probably won't be able to get that tune from your electronic device out of my head for at least the rest of the day!

    Sleep well.

    Gassho,
    Dosho

  4. #4

    Re: February 6, 2010 - OUR MONTHLY 4-hour ZAZENKAI

    Hiyas
    Just finished sitting tonight. First time to my best recollection that i have heard/read the elephant parable, thank you for the enlightening me (da da da dum!)
    Hope your feeling better soon. Was feeling rather outta whack myself and a good long sit seemed to be just what i needed, well that and the 3hour nap prior to sitting.
    Thank you!

    Gassho
    Shohei

  5. #5
    Senior Member KellyRok's Avatar
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    Re: February 6, 2010 - OUR MONTHLY 4-hour ZAZENKAI

    Hello all,

    Jundo, thank you for the wonderful sit...I sat with the recorded version. I loved your stories! I have actually heard the elephant story before. When I used to work fulltime, my mentor used this story during a 'team building' meeting - a little different, yet the same. Wonderful either way!

    Thank you for sharing your experience with dialogue in the dark. I can only imagine what it must have been like.

    Gassho,
    Kelly-Jinmei

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