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Thread: Manjusri w/o Sword

  1. #1

    Manjusri w/o Sword

    I am looking to acquire a Manjusri figure w/o sword for my home shrine. Examples:







    Does anyone know of a reliable internet business that sells one?

    :?:

  2. #2

    Re: Manjusri w/o Sword

    Cant; help there, but you could just print out a picture you like, that's what I've done with Kanzeon.

    In gassho, Kev

  3. #3

    Re: Manjusri w/o Sword

    BUMP!

    After doing some research, I think I have answered my question. But. Here it goes. Tonite I went to a local store and bought the figurine I was told was Manjusri:







    But. I went to my googling and seems this figurine represents Samantabhadra:



    vs

    Manjusri:



    So. I got the "wrong" figurine? Nevertheless, I dig my figurine. Haven't seen one like this before here in my region.

  4. #4

    Re: Manjusri w/o Sword

    Hi,

    That's amazing iconography, I haven't seen either Manjushri or Samantabhadra in those styles before. The loose posture (none meditational) and stepping down.

    I normally equate that the loose posture with an acceptance of the non-void and the stepping down as a going out into the world to help (for example Kannon and Tara). Do you know where this style originates? I would suspect China.

    I would guess the difference between Manjushri and Samantabhadra is the lion and elephant with Manjushri the lion roar of wisdom and Samantabhadra the colossal origin of everything.

    Anyway, I know little of iconography and really should do more homework myself but am interested in what other folks know.

    Lovely figure by the way. I have Prajnaparamita figure I'd be happy to post images of if anyone is interested.

    Cheers,

    Paul

  5. #5

    Re: Manjusri w/o Sword

    Hi,

    I find this a very well done site for information on statuary, symbolism and such ...

    http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/fugen.shtml

    http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/monju.shtml

    http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/bodhisattva.shtml

    I am sure your answers are in there somewhere.

    Gassho, J

  6. #6

    Re: Manjusri w/o Sword

    Quote Originally Posted by prg5001

    Lovely figure by the way. I have Prajnaparamita figure I'd be happy to post images of if anyone is interested.

    [Raises Hand] Sure! Post 'em [/raises hand]

  7. #7

    Re: Manjusri w/o Sword

    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo
    Hi,

    I find this a very well done site for information on statuary, symbolism and such ...

    http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/fugen.shtml

    http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/monju.shtml

    http://www.onmarkproductions.com/html/bodhisattva.shtml

    I am sure your answers are in there somewhere.

    Gassho, J
    Thank you, Jundo!

    What place does Fugen have in Zen, if any at all? :?:

  8. #8

    Re: Manjusri w/o Sword

    Quote Originally Posted by chicanobudista

    Thank you, Jundo!

    What place does Fugen have in Zen, if any at all? :?:
    Hi Erik,

    Fugen (Samantabhadra) Bodhisattva is a central figure in mainstream, traditional Mahayana Buddhism. Ch'an/Zen temples in China and Japan are filled with Mahayana imagery ... which is to be expected, as they are mainstream, traditional Mahayana institutions.

    The best explanation I have is probably from old D.T. Suzuki (often confused by new folks with Shunryu Suzuki Roshi) in his 1934 "Manual of Zen Buddhism":

    Each Buddhist sect in Japan has its own Honzon, i.e. "the chief honoured one" as its main object of worship: for instance, the Jodo and the Shin have Amida Nyorai; the Shingon, Dainichi Nyorai (Mahavairocana); the Nichiren and the Zen, Shaka Nyorai (Sakyamuni). But this tradition Is not uniformly observed by the Zen sect and much latitude has been allowed to the founder of each temple or monastery.

    The Buddha Sakyamuni is the proper one no doubt for all Zen institutions, for Zen claims to transmit the Buddha-heart--the first transmission taking place between Sakyamuni and Mahakashyapa. Sakyamuni thus occupies the main seat of honour on the Zen altar. But frequently we find there a statue of Kwannon (Avalokitesvara), or Yakushi (Bhaishajyaguru), or Jizo (Kshitigarbha), or Miroku (Maitreya), or even a trinity of Amida, Shaka, and Miroku. In this latter case Amida is the Buddha of the past, Shaka of the present, and Miroku of the future.

    When the Honzon is Sakyamuni he is sometimes attended by a pair of Bodhisattvas and another of Arhats. The Bodhisattvas are Monju (Manjusri) and Fugen (Samantabhadra), and the Arhats are Kasho (Mahakashyapa) and Anan (Ananda). Sakyamuni is here both historical and "metaphysical", so to speak. Seeing him attended by his two chief disciples, he is a historical figure, but with Monju and Fugen who represent or symbolize wisdom and love, the two ruling attributes of the highest Reality, Sakyamuni is Vairocana standing above the world of transmigration s. Here we see the philosophy of the Avatamsaka or Gandavyuha incorporated into Zen. In fact, our religious life has two aspects--the experience itself and its philosophy.

    This is represented in Buddhism by the historical trinity of Sakyamuni, Kashyapa, and Ananda, and by the metaphysical one of Vairocana, Manjusri, and Samantabhadra. Ananda stands for learning, intellection, and philosophizing; Kashyapa for life, experience, and realization; and Sakyamuni naturally for the unifying body in which experience and intellection find their field of harmonious co-operation. That religion needs philosophy is sometimes forgotten, and one of the great merits achieved by Buddhism is that it has never ignored this truth, and wherever it is propagated it helps the native genius of that land to develop its philosophy or to supply an intellectual background to its already-existing beliefs.

    ...

    II
    THE BODHISATTVAS

    When Sakyamuni is not found in the Main Buddha all, one of the following Bodhisattvas is enshrined in his ace: Monju (Manjusri), Fugen (Samantabhadra), Kwan-non (Avalokitesvara), Yakushi (Bhaishajyaguru), Miroku (Maitreya), Jizo (Kshitigarbha), or sometimes Kokuzo (Akasagarbha).

    Monju and Fugen generally go in pairs and are the chief Bodhisattvas in the Avatamsaka (Kegon) conception of the world. Monju stands for Prajna. Sitting on a lion he holds a sword which is meant to cut all the intellectual and affectional entanglements in order to reveal the light of transcendental Prajna. Fugen is found on an elephant and presents love, Karuna. Karuna is contrasted with Prajna in that Prajna points to annihilation and to identity whereas Karuna points to construction and to multiplicity. The one is intellectual and the other emotional; the one unifies and the her diversifies. Fugen's ten vows are well known to students of the Kegon.

    s="postlink" href="http://www.sacred-texts.com/bud/mzb/mzb06.htm">http://www.sacred-texts.com/bud/mzb/mzb06.htm
    Fugen's vows are:

    Bodhisattva Fugen's Ten Vows
    (Recorded in the Avatamaska Sutra; aka the Garland Sutra)

    1. To Venerate All Buddhas

    2. To Give Praise to the Infinite Number of Buddhas

    3. To Make Offerings to the Buddhas; the most meaningful offering is to practice the Buddhist teachings so as to benefit oneself and others

    4. To repent and reform all karmic hindrance, accumulated from our thoughts, words, or actions, throughout our past reincarnations

    5. To rejoice in the merits and virtues of others and to cultivate such virtue

    6. To pray that the Dharma Wheel (Buddha's Teachings) will be turned (passed on)

    7. To petition that the Buddhas remain in the world to benefit more people

    8. To always follow the Buddha's path (teachings) in order to attain enlightenment

    9. To live harmoniously with all living beings, i.e., to respect all beings, and be as attentive to them as one would be to one's own parents or even to the Buddhas

    10. To share (give back) one's accumulating merits and virtues with all living beings to help all attain salvation

  9. #9

    Re: Manjusri w/o Sword

    Quote Originally Posted by chicanobudista
    Quote Originally Posted by prg5001

    Lovely figure by the way. I have Prajnaparamita figure I'd be happy to post images of if anyone is interested.

    [Raises Hand] Sure! Post 'em [/raises hand]
    I just found I can't upload here but would need to upload somewhere else and link. I'll have a look around for a photo site.

    Cheers,

    Paul

  10. #10

    Re: Manjusri w/o Sword

    Quote Originally Posted by prg5001
    I just found I can't upload here but would need to upload somewhere else and link. I'll have a look around for a photo site.

    FWIW, I use photobucket.com .

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