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Thread: Buddhist treks in Japan

  1. #1

    Buddhist treks in Japan

    I saw a book somewhere, a long time ago, about someone doing a trek across Japan following the route of some ancient Buddhist monk, a route that isn't very popular these days. I think it was called Northern something or other?? The author might have been Canadian. Anyone know what I'm talking about? Could be my memory is completely wrong

    Skye

  2. #2
    Treeleaf Unsui rculver's Avatar
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    Re: Buddhist treks in Japan

    Skye,

    I know there is an article in National Geographic about someone following the poet Basho's last trek around Japan. I'm not sure if he is writing a book about it though. You can go on the National Geographic website and check.
    (I don't know if this is what you are thinking of)

    Ron

  3. #3

    Re: Buddhist treks in Japan

    Wow that was fast, thanks Yes, I think I was probably thinking of "Basho's Narrow Road"
    (well it started with an N, I was close heh)

    The NG story: http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/ ... orman-text

    Skye

  4. #4

    Re: Buddhist treks in Japan

    Hi,

    There are many of these "pilgrimage routes" in Japan, much as in Europe.The most famous is the 88 Temples of Shikoku, which is associated with Shingon Buddhism.

    http://www.buddhistchannel.tv/index.php ... 66,0,0,1,0

    People make these treks to all kinds of Buddhist temples around the country, dressed in traditional pilgrim garb ...



    Gassho, Jundo

  5. #5

    Re: Buddhist treks in Japan

    Not related to what you were inquiring about I think, but there is also the Tendai marathon monks, which is interesting and quite a respectful feat.

    http://www.lehigh.edu/dmd1/public/www-data/holly.html

    Gassho Will

  6. #6

    Re: Buddhist treks in Japan

    In 18 days time I am running the Ronda 101. It is a 101km race within 24hrs through 7 towns around an area called Ronda in Spain. I have been using my limited understanding of meditation and Kinhin as part of my training and found it very helpful. I am also intending to use it for the duration of the race. I'm also planning all types of sitting after the race
    I hadn't realised that there were groups of people or monks who use ultra running as such a major part of their practice.
    Can I ask where you got that info from will and do you have any more info about this sort of training?

  7. #7

    Re: Buddhist treks in Japan

    Quote Originally Posted by plankton
    In 18 days time I am running the Ronda 101.
    In 18 days time ... I will --not-- be running the Ronda 101. Maybe next year!

    There was a pretty good book, and documentary, on the "Marathon Monks" ...

    http://www.millennium-tv.com/Monks.htm

    Let us know how your Ronda goes!

    Gassho, Jundo

  8. #8

    Re: Buddhist treks in Japan

    Hi Phil,

    I saw a doc on them years ago and was pretty amazed. The monk in the doc i saw didn't run, though he did walk on at a fair pace. Puts outr adveture races/marathons etc into perspective, no cosy running shoes or scientific sports drinks etc! The final 9 day fast nearly killed him.

    Hope the run goes well, my brother does adventure races and long distance fell races, pity you're so far away, he's struggling to find a matched partner.

    All the best, Kev

  9. #9

    Re: Buddhist treks in Japan

    Phil
    Can I ask where you got that info from will and do you have any more info about this sort of training?
    I found that in the the resources part of a site. That's pretty much all they had. A google search brings up quite a bit though.

    If you haven't googled it already:

    http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=Ma ... gle+Search

    Some quotes from "Marathon Monks of Mount Hiei" include: "The first and last day of the 1000 day walk are no different; the beginning is the end and the end is the beginning. Your only aim is to achieve your initial purpose, then you can really enjoy what you have done. There is no backing out. When you have finished what you have set out to do you have created something of huge value"; "The more you suffer the more pleasure you get from what you are doing. If you let your mind dwell on the pain you will debase it. If you only think about the pain you are not ready. The pain is only a technique so you can learn to overcome it. To get to the top you have to climb the mountain step by step. If you find that painful you should not have set out on the journey in the first place. It is not the pain that really matters, pain is only a symptom of the effort you are putting into the task"; "Never look back, be forever mindful of others, and keep the eyes at all times set on the way. If you do this, the Marathon Monks are telling us, there is nothing that cannot be accomplished".

    Gassho

  10. #10

    Re: Buddhist treks in Japan

    However, Practice seems to be so subtle that there are many chances for ego to misinterpret and use what someone says for it's own ends. I think the first part is probably the clearest.

    The first and last day of the 1000 day walk are no different; the beginning is the end and the end is the beginning

    G,W

  11. #11

    Re: Buddhist treks in Japan

    I think
    chances for ego to misinterpret
    are in all things we do.
    Activites like running can also bring the runner back to reality especially 20 or 30miles in.
    For a lot of non Buddhist distance runners it is the same. Breathe in, step , step, breathe out. If there is a breeze, oh breeze, breathe in, step , step breathe out. If there is a lot of traffic, oh traffic, breath in, step step breath out, et cetera.

    Kev, endurance racing really has taken off in the UK, though I suppose the fell runners have been doing it for years. I did think about trying one or two over there bit is is soooo cold (shudder) :lol: If your brother needs any info for events over here let me know.

    Thanks for the well wishing, I need it

    p.s. I will try and post pictures when I get back.

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