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Thread: June 2nd-3rd, 2017 - OUR MONTHLY 4-hour ZAZENKAI!

  1. #1

    June 2nd-3rd, 2017 - OUR MONTHLY 4-hour ZAZENKAI!

    Today's Talk is what I know of Master Dogen's Instructions to the Ino (text below)

    Please 'sit-a-long' with our MONTHLY 4-hour ZAZENKAI, netcast LIVE 8am to noon Japan time Saturday morning (that is New York 7pm to 11pm, Los Angeles 4pm to 8pm (Friday night), London midnight to 4am and Paris 1am to 5am (early Saturday morning)) ... and visible at the following link during those times ...

    ... to be visible on the below screen during those times and any time thereafter ...

    LIVE ZAZENKAI NETCAST at GOOGLE+ IS HERE:
    CLICK ON THE TAB ON LOWER RIGHT FOR 'FULL SCREEN




    Dharma talk audio / podcast episode:
    https://treeleaf.podbean.com/e/june-...ns-to-the-ino/


    FOR THOSE NOT ALREADY MEMBERS OF THE CIRCLE WHO WISH TO JOIN TO SIT LIVE WITH A CAMERA, INSTRUCTIONS are posted AT THIS LINK. WE ARE NOW LIMITED TO 10 INDIVIDUALS WITH CAMERAS, BUT ANY NUMBER CAN WATCH LIVE 'ONE WAY' AND SIT-A-LONG VIA THE ABOVE SCREEN. IF JOINING WITH CAMERA, PLEASE MAKE SURE YOUR MICROPHONE IS MUTED:


    The Sitting Schedule is as follows:

    00:00 - 00:50 CEREMONY (HEART SUTRA IN JAPANESE / SANDOKAI IN ENGLISH) & ZAZEN
    00:50 - 01:00 KINHIN
    01:00 - 01:30 ZAZEN
    01:30 - 01:50 KINHIN

    01:50 - 02:30 DHARMA TALK & ZAZEN
    02:30 - 02:40 KINHIN

    02:40 - 03:15 ZAZEN
    03:15 - 03:30 KINHIN
    03:30 - 04:00 METTA CHANT & ZAZEN, VERSE OF ATONEMENT, FOUR VOWS, & CLOSING



    Our Zazenkai consists of our chanting the 'Heart Sutra' in Japanese and the 'Identity of Relative and Absolute (Sandokai)' in English (please download our Chant Book at the link below), some full floor prostrations (please follow along with me ... or a simple Gassho can be substituted if you wish), a little talk by me ... and we close with the 'Metta Chant', followed at the end with the 'Verse of Atonement' and 'The Four Vows'. Oh, and lots and lots of Zazen and walkin' Kinhin in between!

    Please download and print out the Chants we will recite at the following link (PDF):

    Chant Book (PDF)

    or

    Chant Book (SHORT VERSION HTML)

    Not everyone realizes that they can join in the Chanting of the Heart Sutra, Identity of Relative & Absolute, Metta Verses, Verse of Atonement and Four Vows (although we ask that you keep your microphone down). Please follow along with the Chant Book, and let your voice ring!

    I STRONGLY SUGGEST THAT YOU POSITION YOUR ZAFU ON THE FLOOR IN A PLACE WHERE YOU ARE NOT STARING DIRECTLY AT THE COMPUTER SCREEN, BUT CAN GLANCE OVER AND SEE THE SCREEN WHEN NECESSARY. YOUR ZAFU SHOULD ALSO BE IN A POSITION WHERE YOU CAN SEE THE COMPUTER SCREEN WHILE STANDING IN FRONT OF THE ZAFU FOR THE CEREMONIES, AND HAVE ROOM FOR BOWING AND KINHIN.

    ALSO, REMEMBER TO SET YOUR COMPUTER (& SCREEN SAVER) SO THAT IT DOES NOT SHUT OFF DURING THE 4 HOURS.


    I hope you will join us ... an open Zafu is waiting. When we drop all thought of 'here' 'there' 'now' 'then' ... we are sitting all together!


    Gassho, Jundo
    Last edited by Sekishi; 06-08-2017 at 02:10 AM. Reason: Added podcast link.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  2. #2
    Our Talk this Month is "What I Know about the Ino" (the Supervisor of Monks) ... a monastic office, but not that far from our own lives, jobs and family duties ...

    It is from Master Dogen's "Pure Standards for the Temple Administrators (Chiji Shingi)" for Eiheiji Monastery (translated by Taigen Leighton and Shohaku Okumura)




    THE INO

    Glossary of Terms at Bottom



    The ino* [a term derived] from the Sanskrit, here [in China] is called yuezhong [giver of joy to the assembly]. Generally, [the ino*] supervises all the affairs of monks. Those newly arrived to hang up their belongings as residents in the assembly should be cared for with courtesy and esteem. Those who have worked elsewhere as temple administrators [chiji] and any noted virtuous monks should especially be assigned to a superior dormitory. Former abbots retired from their temples should be assigned seat positions for meals in the monks' hall at the three head seats [seido*, godo*, and tanto*], according to the seniority of the histories in their record book as abbot or their documents of opening the hall. Similarly, other reknowned, virtuous monks should be placed next to the three head seats according to their ordination age.

    In the monks' hall in winter and summer, [the ino* has the responsibility] to add or remove the woolen matting from the platforms, exchange the warm cloth curtains and the cool bamboo curtains at the entrances, and open up or shut the charcoal pit [behind the altar, for warming the hall]. A signboard with everyone listed in order of ordination age should be prepared before the summer practice period.

    [The ino*] should always have Manjushri's jisha prepare the incense and lamps at the altars and clean the offering trays in front of the hall before the assembly comes. The ino* and the doan* assistants take care of the doorways and windows in the various monks' dormitories, and check the curtains [before the bedding cabinets] at each place on the sitting platforms. They also make sure that the various implements and supplies are in working order, and must always notice if they are kept neatly. If there is something broken or lacking, ask the director or the work leader [shissui] to replace it.

    Together with the infirmary hall manager, [the ino*] should have attendants take care of food, bedding, and other needs of sick monks, never allowing sick people to be neglected. In the temple such positions as the department managers, the abbot's jishas, the infirmary hall manager, the charcoal pit manager, the study hall manager, the head monk, and the librarian are all recommended by the ino*. When generous amounts of offering money are left at the buddha hall or other altar halls, the abbot appoints someone [to collect it].

    If there is a violation of the rules, for serious matters, after getting the abbot's approval expel the person from the assembly. For a minor matter only have the person change ryo*, [i.e., work position and/or resting space]. If there is some troublesome dispute, it should be settled by having [the parties] courteously reconciled. If the two people quarreling do not bow [to the ino's* mediation], then it should be judged according to the rules. If something is missing in the assembly and the person who lost it firmly demands a thorough inspection, then [the ino* should] tell the monks and search the particular study room. If it is not found in the search, then that monk should leave the assembly or transfer rooms. If a lost item is not important, then [the ino*] should try to persuade the person making the request to desist, and avoid troubling the assembly and retarding the spirit of the monastery.

    When money is offered to the sacred image [of Manjushri in the monks' hall], it should only be for buying incense, lamps, and offering vessels, not used for other purposes. When the offering box is opened, the money should be placed in the ino's* keeping, and then together with Manjushri's jisha, [the ino*] enters it in the accounts and uses it for expenses.

    If there is something that concerns the government registry of ordination, [the ino*] must wait for the authorities to announce their instructions and then put up a signboard declaring it. Upon receiving a monk's personal history, [the ino*] should check it with the government bureau. According to the current procedures and custom [of each temple and Chinese district], the temple pays money to register the monks. Although submitting documents for certification is solely the director's duty to dispatch, if they come by way of the ino's * office, of course consider them sincerely and in detail. The government bureau's documents of certification of the monks in residence all must be examined [by the ino*] as to whether or not they are authentic. This should not be done carelessly or abruptly.

    If a monk is sick the authorities should be informed. After the funeral for a dead monk, [the ino*] quotes a price for the robes and belongings, and delivers back to the authorities the dead monk's ordination certificate or their document awarding a national teacher name and purple robe. The ino* alone attends to all of this, and informs the director, who declares it to the authorities. Delivering to the authorities the public documents and the ordination certificate of the dead monk should be done within the official time limit.

    [The ino*] should hit the tsui chin and recite the dedication, identifying clearly and in detail [a donation of a meal] to support the donor's arousal of goodness.

    Especially when serving tea to newly arrived [monks], no courtesy should be lacking. As soon as they arrive, their ordination date must be reported to the [abbot's] jisha, the temple administrators, the department heads, and the department where they are assigned. It is important to make known the level of seniority of their ordination age. (Some newly arrived monks sit in senior seats. The more recently ordained are in lower seats.) [The ino*] should have the study hall make for each new monk one nameplate for entering the hall and one nameplate of ordination age, to be posted or removed at the appropriate occasions. What is most important is not to make mistakes with either the seating positions for serving tea or the rotation for being study hall manager, which might upset and disturb the assembly.

    For community work [fushin], all monks must participate equally except the study hall manager and the jikido*. [Even] the abbot is not excused unless sick or meeting with official guests, and [if the abbot] does not proceed to work at once, their jisha must leave the temple.

    The ino* job is called the delight of the assembly in China. Although [the position of ino*] is the remains of Venerable Maudgalyayana, it is just like the majestic dignity of all the buddha tathagatas. So this is called [the ino's*] regarding with love all who arrive and compassionately nourishing monks, so that the assembly's heart becomes the [ino's*] own heart and the mindfulness of the Way becomes the [ino's*] own mindfulness. Therefore [this attitude] can make parents into [nurturing] parents and can make children into [loving] children. In that case, [the ino*] is just like the rudder of a boat crossing the great river or a long rainy spell after a great drought.

    The Sutra of the Three Thousand Deportments says, ''There are seven matters to welcome newly arrived monks with: first, as soon as they arrive, to inquire about their well-being [after their travels]; second, to give them a seat according to seniority; third, to provide them with a vacant room; fourth, to provide bedding, a quilt, and a pillow; fifth, to provide lamps; sixth, to tell them the instructions for monks [at that temple]; seventh, to tell them the regional customs and conventions." Therefore, if you see a newly arrived monk, first ask whether or not they have practice equipment. Then ask how far it is to their native place. Ask if their original [ordination] teacher is alive or not, then what temple they have just arrived from. After that, according to dharma [appropriately] get them settled.

    ======================

    GLOSSARY

    ino* ( ) The supervisor of the monks' hall, and generally of the monks' conduct, one of the six temple administrators. See chiji. The word ino* derives from the Sanskrit karmadana, literally, bestower of conduct [karma], i.e., the one who assigns monks their activities and places in the sodo*. The i of ino* comes from the Chinese, meaning "oversee"; whil the no* of ino* is used to transliterate the na of karmadana. Yuezhong [esshu in Japanese] was used as a Chinese translation for the ino* position, and means, literally, "joy or delight to the assembly."

    chiji ( ) Literally, "know, manage, or take care of affairs"; term for the temple administrator positions, which are discussed in detail in the last section of Eihei Shingi, "Pure Standards for the Temple Administrators," or Chiji Shingi. Today chiji often refers to the roku [six] chiji: the director tsusu*, assistant director kansu, treasurer fusu*, supervisor of the monks' conduct ino*, chief cook tenzo, and work leader shissui. ... Along with the four primary chiji positions (kan'in, ino *, tenzo, and shissui), "Pure Standards for the Temple Administrators" also discusses other positions of responsibility in the monastery, such as the garden manager, the fire manager, and the mill manager

    seido* ( ) Literally, "west hall," named for the person's seat at the head (beginning) of the platform inside the front (west) entrance of the monks' hall, toward the south, left "lower" side. This refers to a visiting teacher participating in the monastic practice period. Originally it was a former abbot of another temple, but now it is used for any highly respected visiting teacher

    godo* ( ) Literally, "back hall," referring to the person who is the head of training in a large monastery, and who sits at the head of the platform by the back entrance of the north side of the hall, opposite the seats of the abbot and head monk.

    tanto* ( ) Literally, "head of the tan," referring to the person who assists the godo* as head of training. The tanto* sits at the head of the platform opposite the seido*, by the back entrance of the south, lower side of the monks' hall

    jisha ( ) The abbot's attendant, a senior monk who fulfills many functions, including acting as formal attendant during ceremonies and on travels, acting as a secretary, and acting as intermediary with monks or visitors.

    doan* ( ) Short for dosu* kuka anja. The doans*, literally the ino's* anjas or attendants, strike instruments during chanting and make offerings (flowers, incense, etc.) to altars.

    shissui ( ) The monastery work leader responsible for maintenance of the physical facilities; one of the six temple administrators

    jikido* ( ) The person assigned, in rotation from the assembly, to cleaning and taking care of the monks' hall and who remains in attendance in the hall when all the other monks are elsewhere. In modern times they also carry the kyosaku* stick, and ring the wake up bell each morning in between the practice periods.

    fushin ( ) Community work, literally, "everyone invited," a word still used in common Japanese for community work projects. During fushin, also called samu, everyone in the monastery, without exception, is expected to work. This tradition derives from Baizhang, who is famous for saying, "A day without work is a day without eating."

    Maudgalyayana [I.] (6th cent. B.C.E.) One of Shakyamuni's ten great disciples, foremost in the manifestation of supernatural powers. He was ino* at Veluvana vihara, the monastery donated by King Bimbisara
    Last edited by Jundo; 06-02-2017 at 10:39 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  3. #3
    Thank you Jundo, I will be there live with instruments ready. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    SatToday/LAH
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

    As a trainee priest, please take any commentary by me on matters of the Dharma with a pinch of salt.

  4. #4
    Treeleaf Unsui / Engineer Sekishi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Thank you Jundo. There are complications at this end today so I will be late joining, but hope to make it for at least part of the Zazenkai. Thank you to all.

    Gassho,
    Sekishi #lah


    Sent from my Tricorder using Tapatalk Pro
    sekishi
    石志

    As a novice priest-in-training, this is simply an expression of my opinion. Please take it with a grain of salt.

  5. #5
    Thank you, Jundo and Shingen. I look forward to joining live, two-way, tech allowing.

    Gassho,
    Onkai

  6. #6
    Hi Jundo!

    I'll be there live with a fan right next to me. A mechanical fan, not a human who likes what I do :P

    Gassho,

    Kyonin
    Please remember I am only a priest in training. I could be wrong in everything I say. Slap me if needed.

    The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one. Mr. Spock

  7. #7
    Hey folks,

    Here is the event link for tonights zazenkai: https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts...ckuqj2kc2ueuqe

    Gassho
    Shingen

    SatToday/LAH
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

    As a trainee priest, please take any commentary by me on matters of the Dharma with a pinch of salt.

  8. #8
    Member Kakunen's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    Eiheiji our 1st temple at JAPAN
    I will sit 1 way together.


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  9. #9
    The Buddha's quote, not that practice is impossible (quite the contrary), but that it is easier to be a monk. As he said in many a Sutta ...

    "Household life is crowded, cramped, frustrating and dusty!
    The Life gone forth is out in the wide open... It is not easy, while living in a home, to live this Noble life
    utterly perfect and pure, as a polished shell ...


    Real life ain't for the weak, and it sure isn't weak Practice.

    And Hokey Pokey in Malay ... a Malay Pokey ... berpusing pusing pusing Mudahkn caranya ...



    Tangan kanan ke atas,tangan kanan ke bawah
    Angkat ke atas, mari mari goyangkan
    Marilah kita Hokey Pokey berpusing pusing pusing
    Mudahkn caranya




    Gassho, J

    SatTodayLAH
    Last edited by Jundo; 06-03-2017 at 02:27 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  10. #10
    Wonderful, thank you Jundo and everyone ... have a lovely weekend. =)

    Jundo, I also noticed out of the corner of my eye that the butterflies like you too. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    SatToday/LAH
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

    As a trainee priest, please take any commentary by me on matters of the Dharma with a pinch of salt.

  11. #11
    Thank you all who sat and who will sit.

    The talk was beautiful. Thank you Jundo.

    Gassho,

    Kyonin
    Sat/LAH/Danced
    Please remember I am only a priest in training. I could be wrong in everything I say. Slap me if needed.

    The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one. Mr. Spock

  12. #12
    Treeleaf Unsui / Engineer Sekishi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Thank you all for practicing together.

    Deep bows,
    Sekishi #sat #lah
    sekishi
    石志

    As a novice priest-in-training, this is simply an expression of my opinion. Please take it with a grain of salt.

  13. #13
    Thank you, everyone. Have a great weekend!

    Gassho,
    Onkai
    SatToday

  14. #14
    Thank you Jundo, Shingen and everyone. And thank you for the words of support for this sometimes very difficult at-home practice we do. Couldn't do it without you all!
    Gassho
    Jakuden
    SatToday/LAH


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    serene
    ​field

  15. #15
    Hello everyone, I was not able to join in at all yesterday, but I am grateful for the recording which I plan on having a look at during the up-and-coming week.

    Thank you for your practice everyone.

    Gassho,
    Joyo
    sat todaylah

  16. #16
    Hello everyone

    I just sat with all of you and zazenkai recording. I am grateful for that.
    Have a great week.

    Gassho, Gokai

    SatToday/LAH
    David Cravidão Lopes Pereira

  17. #17
    Thank you Jundo, Shingen and all

    Gassho
    Washin
    sat and lah

  18. #18
    Thank you all, especially our Ino!

    Good to have a talk on the role of the ino. It was definitely a chapter of Dogen that I passed over pretty quickly to get onto the more poetic and 'deep' stuff but this talk was a good reminder that the role of the ino is very important just as that of the tenzo and all the other people who make up the temple or sangha. Thank you!

    On the subject of tonglen, I plan to write a little something as this has been a practice of mine for quite some years and my last teacher translated one of the key lojong (mind training) texts which deals with it.

    Deep bows
    Kokuu
    -sattoday/LAH-
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  19. #19
    Sitting this one tonight.
    Gassho
    Matt

  20. #20
    Treeleaf Unsui / Engineer Sekishi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Location
    Virginia, USA
    Jundo's "instructions to the Ino" talk is now up as a podcast: https://treeleaf.podbean.com/e/june-...ns-to-the-ino/

    Gassho,
    Sekishi #lah #sat
    sekishi
    石志

    As a novice priest-in-training, this is simply an expression of my opinion. Please take it with a grain of salt.

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Sekishi View Post
    Jundo's "instructions to the Ino" talk is now up as a podcast: https://treeleaf.podbean.com/e/june-...ns-to-the-ino/

    Gassho,
    Sekishi #lah #sat
    Thank you Sekishi ... this is a great talk. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    SatToday/LAH
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

    As a trainee priest, please take any commentary by me on matters of the Dharma with a pinch of salt.

  22. #22
    Really, really free of enmity LOL

    Grateful that we have recordings of these. Sat with you today
    Gassho

    SatToday/LAH

    Banto (aka Rodney)
    万磴 (Myriad StoneSteps)

  23. #23
    Thank you so much for making time travel possible - it felt great to finally be able to be part of a long monthly session, albeit a couple of weeks later than the rest of you. (It was a public holiday here in Australia today.)
    At one point during Zazen I looked up and there was this beautiful white moth flying above Jundo and settling on the gong and I was totally awed about the peace and tranquility that it added to my NOW, when the moth - thousands of kilometers away, and well in the past - was most definitely totally unaware.

    Gassho and till next time,
    Fiona

    SatToday/LAH
    --------------------------------------------------------------------
    Sewing a Rakusu for Jukai late 2017 - soooo excited!

  24. #24
    Gassho

    Daizan
    Sat today/ LAH
    As a trainee I ask that all comments by me on matters of Dharma be taken with "a grain of salt".

  25. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by Sekishi View Post
    Jundo's "instructions to the Ino" talk is now up as a podcast: https://treeleaf.podbean.com/e/june-...ns-to-the-ino/

    Gassho,
    Sekishi #lah #sat
    Thank you. I got caught up on this talk today.

    Gassho
    Warren
    Sat/LAH today

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