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Thread: February 4-5th, 2017 - Our SPECIAL "NEHAN-E" 4-hour ZAZENKAI!

  1. #1

    February 4-5th, 2017 - Our SPECIAL "NEHAN-E" 4-hour ZAZENKAI!

    READINGS FOR TODAY'S DHARMA TALK ARE BELOW IN THIS THREAD.


    WELCOME to our Memorial & Celebration of NEHAN-E, (Pari-Nirvana) the traditional day to mark the historical Buddha's death and passing from this visible world. This is also a day for each of us to remember in our homes those family and friends who have gone before. As well, we particularly mark the passing of Nishijima Gudo Wafu and Rempo Niwa Zenji ...


    During this Zazenkai, we will commence with SPECIAL CHANTS & a CEREMONY to recall our parents, grand-parents, siblings, our relatives near and distant, all our ancestors reaching back through the generations, and our dear friends and other cherished ones who have passed.

    This Zazenkai will be netcast LIVE 8am to noon Japan time Saturday morning (that is New York 6pm to 10pm, Los Angeles 3pm to 7pm (Friday night), London 11pm to 3am and Paris midnight to 4am (early Saturday morning)) ... and visible at the following link during those times ...

    ... to be visible on the below screen during those times and any time thereafter ...

    LIVE ZAZENKAI NETCAST IS HERE:
    CLICK ON THE TAB ON LOWER RIGHT FOR 'FULL SCREEN




    Dharma talk audio / podcast episode:
    https://treeleaf.podbean.com/e/febru...hour-zazenkai/

    To mark this time, our Ceremony at the start of the Zazenkai will include a chanting of “The Verse of Homage to Buddha's Relics, Shariraimon” and Heart Sutra in Chinese-Japanese (to mark our "roots"). Words and details are HERE, please print out if you wish.

    Our sitting schedule for the 4-hour gathering will be as follows ...

    00:00 - 00:50 CEREMONY (SHARIRAIMON in ENGLISH 3x / HEART SUTRA in JAPANESE) & ZAZEN
    00:50 - 01:00 KINHIN
    01:00 - 01:30 ZAZEN
    01:30 - 01:40 KINHIN

    01:40 - 02:30 DHARMA TALK & ZAZEN
    02:30 - 02:40 KINHIN

    02:40 - 03:15 ZAZEN
    03:15 - 03:30 KINHIN
    03:30 - 04:00 METTA CHANT & ZAZEN, VERSE OF ATONEMENT, FOUR VOWS, & CLOSING


    For this special Zazenkai, a statue of the reclining ‘Buddha Entering Parinirvana’, and a Plaque dedicated to all past Generations of Zen Ancestors, will be given special prominence.

    As always, we close with the 'Metta Chant', followed at the end with the 'Verse of Atonement' and 'The Four Vows'.


    I STRONGLY SUGGEST THAT YOU POSITION YOUR ZAFU ON THE FLOOR IN A PLACE WHERE YOU ARE NOT STARING DIRECTLY AT THE COMPUTER SCREEN, BUT CAN GLANCE OVER AND SEE THE SCREEN WHEN NECESSARY. YOUR ZAFU SHOULD ALSO BE IN A POSITION WHERE YOU CAN SEE THE COMPUTER SCREEN WHILE STANDING IN FRONT OF THE ZAFU FOR THE CEREMONIES, AND HAVE ROOM FOR BOWING AND KINHIN.

    ALSO, REMEMBER TO SET YOUR COMPUTER (& SCREEN SAVER) SO THAT IT DOES NOT SHUT OFF DURING THE 4 HOURS.


    I hope you will join us ... an open Zafu is waiting. When we drop all thought of 'here' 'there' 'now' 'then' ... we are sitting all together!


    Gassho, Jundo
    Last edited by Sekishi; 02-12-2017 at 04:38 AM. Reason: Added podcast link.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  2. #2
    Our reading for today's Nehan-e Zazenkai was changed to this passage that Dogen wrote late in life, showing his seemingly very traditional views on Rebirth at that time:

    Eihei Dogen’s Shobogenzo Doshin, “Mind of the Way” (translated by Peter Levitt & Kazuaki Tanahashi)
    “When you leave this life, and before you enter the next life, there is a place called an intermediary realm. You
    stay there for seven days. You should resolve to keep chanting the names of the three treasures without ceasing
    while you are there. After seven days you die in the intermediary realm and remain there for no more than seven
    days. At this time you can see and hear without hindrance, like having a celestial eye. Resolve to encourage
    yourself to keep chanting the names of the three treasures without ceasing: ‘I take refuge in the Buddha. I take
    refuge in the Dharma. I take refuge in the Sangha.’ After passing through the intermediary realm, when you
    approach your parents to be conceived, resolve to maintain authentic wisdom. Keep chanting refuge in the three
    treasures in your mother’s womb. Do not neglect chanting while you are given birth. Resolve deeply to dedicate
    yourself to chant and take refuge in the three treasures through the six sense roots. When your life ends, your
    eye sight will suddenly become dark. Know that this is the end of your life and be determined to chant, ‘I take
    refuge in the buddha.’ Then, all buddhas in the ten directions will show compassion to you. Even if due to
    conditions you are bound to an unwholesome realm, you will be able to be born in the deva realm or in the
    presence of the Buddha. Bow and listen to the Buddha.”
    ===================

    ... and also these readings on ceremonies for the deceased in Soto Zen (perhaps a surprise to some). I ask about their place in our Practice and modern times ...

    Zen Buddhist Ceremonies for the Dead (most of which originated in tenth-century China, before Dogen)
    Funeral ceremonies performed by the living can help the intermediate realm being (stream of consciousness) to
    realize complete awakening, birth in a pure land, or at least rebirth in the upper realms of gods or humans. In
    Soto Zen, the funeral for laypeople begins with ordaining the deceased as a Zen priest (shukke tokudo)—
    receiving the bodhisattva precepts (jukai), initiation into awakening (abhisheka/kancho), and the blood lineage
    document (kechimyaku) as a blessed talisman. Then there are words of guidance and encouragement (insho) for
    the deceased, recitation of the ten names of buddha (nenju), and dedication of merit to adorn the deceased’s
    place of destination (whatever it may be). Incense is offered as nourishment for the intermediate realm scenteater
    (gandharva). Since nobody can know the destination of the deceased person’s stream of consciousness, the
    living just encourage and assist it toward awakening. It is taught that the intermediate realm beings, and other
    non-physical beings such as hungry spirits, can “hear” speech, perceive thoughts and intentions, and meet the
    living in various ways imperceptible on the gross level, with their subtle immaterial bodies and sense faculties.

    Memorial ceremonies are performed every 7 days after death, calling on different buddhas and bodhisattvas to
    help the deceased realize awakening or birth in a pure land, for each of the 7 weeks of the intermediate realm up
    to 49 days—when the intermediate being has either realized complete awakening, been born in a pure land,
    been born into one of the six realms as a bodhisattva, or been born into one of the (hopefully upper) six realms
    as an ordinary being. Annual memorials in Japan are traditionally performed up to 33 years, the maximum time
    (in human years) it takes for a bodhisattva in a pure land to realize complete awakening (buddha).

    Ceremonies for feeding the hungry spirits (sejiki/segaki) are performed every evening in Zen monasteries, and a
    few times a year on a larger scale for any deceased who may have been born in the hungry spirit or hell realms,
    as well as for nature spirits and all one’s deceased relatives (whether or not they are in the hungry spirit realm).
    This ceremony gives them nourishment, human food transformed and made edible through the powerful
    intention expressed by mantras and mudras, and encourages them to be born in a pure land and become
    awakened ones to benefit all beings. Hungry spirits look for nourishment particularly in the evening, and during
    the Ullambana (Obon) festival in mid-July or August. Ceremonies for liberating animals (hojo-e) are performed
    occasionally for freeing animals from being killed, but also to encourage them to be born in their next life in the
    pure land of Ratnashikin Buddha (as taught in the Golden Light Sutra), or at least in the upper realms.

    Daily services in Zen temples involve making offerings, chanting, and dedication of the merit generated from
    these. Morning service is generally dedicated to awakened ones (buddhas), awakening beings (bodhisattvas)
    including Dharma protectors, and deceased Zen ancestors who have now become awakened ones or awakening
    beings in a pure land. In this case the intention is to make offerings to them out of gratitude and to ask for their
    assistance on our path to awakening. Evening service is generally dedicated to deceased relatives and friends,
    hungry spirits, and all ordinary sentient beings. In this case the intention is to make offerings to them to assist
    them on their path to awakening—they may be still in the intermediate realm, or have been born in one of the
    non-physical realms such as gods, hungry spirits, or hell, or be practicing in a pure land.

    Memorial tablets (ihai) and gravesite markers (stupa/toba) with the deceased’s name are a dwelling place in the
    human realm for the deceased person who has now potentially become an awakened reality body (dharmakaya
    buddha) or an awakening being (bodhisattva) in a pure land. Since the maximum time in a pure land before
    becoming a buddha is 33 years, memorial tablets can be burned after that time has passed—or kept as tablets for
    the new buddha, as is the case with those of Zen ancestors and teachers. There are also memorial tablets for the
    myriad hungry spirits, used as a place to offer food to hungry spirits. If the deceased was reborn as a human or
    animal, they would have a physical body and would not need a tablet as their physical dwelling place. Memorial
    tablets and gravesite markers are the location in the human realm for making offerings to non-physical beings—
    in the form of incense, flowers, light, water, food, and chanting—to assist them in their ongoing path to
    awakening, or to ask them as awakened ones to assist us in our path. A home buddha-altar (butsudan),
    especially if it holds memorial tablets, can be understood as a miniature representation of a pure land where the
    deceased ones now dwell. Of course non-physical beings are not limited to that particular dwelling place, but
    that is where humans can meet them, make offerings to them, or receive their blessings.

    From: What Happens After Death According to Buddhas and Zen Ancestors
    (and Zen Buddhist Ceremonies for the Dead Based on this Understanding)
    by Kokyo Henkel


    =============

    Today's Talk closes with a brief look at some words from one of Dogen Zenji's most powerful statements on living and dying: Shobogenzo-Shōji (Life and Death), translated by Nishijima Roshi and Chodo Cross.

    * * *

    This life and death is just the sacred life of buddha. If we hate it
    and want to get rid of it, that is just wanting to lose the sacred life of buddha.
    If we stick in it, if we attach to life and death, this also is to lose the sacred
    life of buddha. We confine ourselves to the condition of buddha. When we
    are without dislike and without longing, then for the first time we enter the
    mind of buddha. But do not consider it with mind and do not say it with
    words! When we just let go of our own body and our own mind and throw
    them into the house of buddha, they are set into action from the side of
    buddha; then when we continue to obey this, without exerting any force and
    without expending any mind, we get free from life and death and become
    buddha. Who would wish to linger in mind?
    Last edited by Jundo; 02-04-2017 at 10:13 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  3. #3
    Member Getchi's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2015
    Location
    Between Sea and Sky, Australia.
    Thank you, very much looking forward to this.


    Thank you,
    Ge off.

    Sat today.
    Nothing to do? Why not Sit?

  4. #4
    Thank you, Jundo.

    I wonder if mention could be made of the fact we lost a sangha member in the last year - Lee/Fugu?

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    ------------------------------------
    Feel free to message me if you wish to talk about issues around practicing with physical limitations. This is something I have been sitting with for a fair while and am happy to help with suggestions or just offer a listening ear.

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by Kokuu View Post
    Thank you, Jundo.

    I wonder if mention could be made of the fact we lost a sangha member in the last year - Lee/Fugu?

    Gassho
    Kokuu
    -sattoday-
    Of course. We will include Lee, and all our friends and loved ones named and unnamed.

    Gassho, J

    SatToday
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  6. #6
    Very nice
    SAT today

    Sent from my XT1585 using Tapatalk
    _/_
    Rich
    MUHYO
    無 (MU, Emptiness) and 氷 (HYO, Ice) ... Emptiness Ice ...

    I may be wrong and not knowing is acceptable

  7. #7
    Lovely Jundo, I will be there live ... Looking forward to it. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    s@today
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

    As a trainee priest, please take any commentary by me on matters of the Dharma with a pinch of salt.

  8. #8
    Will be there one-way as soon as I can get out of work.

    Jundo, is Nishijima pronounced as it looks? I'm sure I must have heard you and others say it but I can't remember.

    Gassho
    Jakuden
    SatToday


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    清 道 寂田
    SEIDO JAKUDEN
    I am a novice priest. Any resemblance my posts may have to actual teachings about the Dharma, living or dead, is purely coincidental (and just my attempt to be helpful).

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Jakuden View Post

    Jundo, is Nishijima pronounced as it looks?
    Oh, I could say something really Koany here!

    But actually, the best way is to wait until the Zazenkai, and you will hear me say his name again.

    Gassho, Jundo

    SatToday

    PS -

    I also posted a link to a film documentary made about him, and to his book which I translated ...

    http://www.treeleaf.org/forums/showt...l=1#post193870
    Last edited by Jundo; 02-02-2017 at 01:44 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  10. #10
    I'll be there with bell ready.

    Gassho,

    Kyonin
    #SatToday
    Please remember I am only a priest in training. I could be wrong in everything I say. Slap me if needed.

    The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one. Mr. Spock

  11. #11
    is Nishijima pronounced as it looks?
    Here people pronounce it as "Nisidzima".
    I wonder if it's close to the original spelling

    Gassho
    Washin
    sattoday

  12. #12
    I also added to our reading for this week's Talk this passage that Dogen wrote late in life, showing his seemingly very traditional views on Rebirth at that time:

    Eihei Dogen’s Shobogenzo Doshin, “Mind of the Way” (translated by Peter Levitt & Kazuaki Tanahashi)
    “When you leave this life, and before you enter the next life, there is a place called an intermediary realm. You
    stay there for seven days. You should resolve to keep chanting the names of the three treasures without ceasing
    while you are there. After seven days you die in the intermediary realm and remain there for no more than seven
    days. At this time you can see and hear without hindrance, like having a celestial eye. Resolve to encourage
    yourself to keep chanting the names of the three treasures without ceasing: ‘I take refuge in the Buddha. I take
    refuge in the Dharma. I take refuge in the Sangha.’ After passing through the intermediary realm, when you
    approach your parents to be conceived, resolve to maintain authentic wisdom. Keep chanting refuge in the three
    treasures in your mother’s womb. Do not neglect chanting while you are given birth. Resolve deeply to dedicate
    yourself to chant and take refuge in the three treasures through the six sense roots. When your life ends, your
    eye sight will suddenly become dark. Know that this is the end of your life and be determined to chant, ‘I take
    refuge in the buddha.’ Then, all buddhas in the ten directions will show compassion to you. Even if due to
    conditions you are bound to an unwholesome realm, you will be able to be born in the deva realm or in the
    presence of the Buddha. Bow and listen to the Buddha.”
    Gassho, J

    SatToday
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  13. #13
    Thank you Jundo
    I'm on the road today so will celebrate this on the weekend.

    Gassho
    Byōkan
    sat today

  14. #14
    I'll be here /there.

    Gassho
    Daizan
    As a trainee I ask that all comments by me on matters of Dharma be taken with "a grain of salt".

  15. #15
    Dear All,

    Another a late substitution on readings for the Talk today ... (It may be a bit surprising for folks who assume that Soto Zen is not really about such ways) ...

    Zen Buddhist Ceremonies for the Dead (most of which originated in tenth-century China, before Dogen)
    Funeral ceremonies performed by the living can help the intermediate realm being (stream of consciousness) to
    realize complete awakening, birth in a pure land, or at least rebirth in the upper realms of gods or humans. In
    Soto Zen, the funeral for laypeople begins with ordaining the deceased as a Zen priest (shukke tokudo)—
    receiving the bodhisattva precepts (jukai), initiation into awakening (abhisheka/kancho), and the blood lineage
    document (kechimyaku) as a blessed talisman. Then there are words of guidance and encouragement (insho) for
    the deceased, recitation of the ten names of buddha (nenju), and dedication of merit to adorn the deceased’s
    place of destination (whatever it may be). Incense is offered as nourishment for the intermediate realm scenteater
    (gandharva). Since nobody can know the destination of the deceased person’s stream of consciousness, the
    living just encourage and assist it toward awakening. It is taught that the intermediate realm beings, and other
    non-physical beings such as hungry spirits, can “hear” speech, perceive thoughts and intentions, and meet the
    living in various ways imperceptible on the gross level, with their subtle immaterial bodies and sense faculties.

    Memorial ceremonies are performed every 7 days after death, calling on different buddhas and bodhisattvas to
    help the deceased realize awakening or birth in a pure land, for each of the 7 weeks of the intermediate realm up
    to 49 days—when the intermediate being has either realized complete awakening, been born in a pure land,
    been born into one of the six realms as a bodhisattva, or been born into one of the (hopefully upper) six realms
    as an ordinary being. Annual memorials in Japan are traditionally performed up to 33 years, the maximum time
    (in human years) it takes for a bodhisattva in a pure land to realize complete awakening (buddha).

    Ceremonies for feeding the hungry spirits (sejiki/segaki) are performed every evening in Zen monasteries, and a
    few times a year on a larger scale for any deceased who may have been born in the hungry spirit or hell realms,
    as well as for nature spirits and all one’s deceased relatives (whether or not they are in the hungry spirit realm).
    This ceremony gives them nourishment, human food transformed and made edible through the powerful
    intention expressed by mantras and mudras, and encourages them to be born in a pure land and become
    awakened ones to benefit all beings. Hungry spirits look for nourishment particularly in the evening, and during
    the Ullambana (Obon) festival in mid-July or August. Ceremonies for liberating animals (hojo-e) are performed
    occasionally for freeing animals from being killed, but also to encourage them to be born in their next life in the
    pure land of Ratnashikin Buddha (as taught in the Golden Light Sutra), or at least in the upper realms.

    Daily services in Zen temples involve making offerings, chanting, and dedication of the merit generated from
    these. Morning service is generally dedicated to awakened ones (buddhas), awakening beings (bodhisattvas)
    including Dharma protectors, and deceased Zen ancestors who have now become awakened ones or awakening
    beings in a pure land. In this case the intention is to make offerings to them out of gratitude and to ask for their
    assistance on our path to awakening. Evening service is generally dedicated to deceased relatives and friends,
    hungry spirits, and all ordinary sentient beings. In this case the intention is to make offerings to them to assist
    them on their path to awakening—they may be still in the intermediate realm, or have been born in one of the
    non-physical realms such as gods, hungry spirits, or hell, or be practicing in a pure land.

    Memorial tablets (ihai) and gravesite markers (stupa/toba) with the deceased’s name are a dwelling place in the
    human realm for the deceased person who has now potentially become an awakened reality body (dharmakaya
    buddha) or an awakening being (bodhisattva) in a pure land. Since the maximum time in a pure land before
    becoming a buddha is 33 years, memorial tablets can be burned after that time has passed—or kept as tablets for
    the new buddha, as is the case with those of Zen ancestors and teachers. There are also memorial tablets for the
    myriad hungry spirits, used as a place to offer food to hungry spirits. If the deceased was reborn as a human or
    animal, they would have a physical body and would not need a tablet as their physical dwelling place. Memorial
    tablets and gravesite markers are the location in the human realm for making offerings to non-physical beings—
    in the form of incense, flowers, light, water, food, and chanting—to assist them in their ongoing path to
    awakening, or to ask them as awakened ones to assist us in our path. A home buddha-altar (butsudan),
    especially if it holds memorial tablets, can be understood as a miniature representation of a pure land where the
    deceased ones now dwell. Of course non-physical beings are not limited to that particular dwelling place, but
    that is where humans can meet them, make offerings to them, or receive their blessings.

    From: What Happens After Death According to Buddhas and Zen Ancestors
    (and Zen Buddhist Ceremonies for the Dead Based on this Understanding)
    by Kokyo Henkel
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  16. #16
    Thank you, Jundo. I will join with this later this weekend.

    Gassho,
    Onkai
    SatToday

  17. #17

  18. #18
    Hey folks,

    Here is tonights event link if needed: https://hangouts.google.com/hangouts...orztwbr4ffjeae

    Gassho
    Shingen

    s@today
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

    As a trainee priest, please take any commentary by me on matters of the Dharma with a pinch of salt.

  19. #19
    Thank you Jundo, lovely talk ... thank you folks for sitting and practicing, here, there, and everywhere. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    s@today
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

    As a trainee priest, please take any commentary by me on matters of the Dharma with a pinch of salt.

  20. #20
    Thank you all who sat with us... visible and invisible... in all planes of existence.

    Gassho,

    Kyonin
    Please remember I am only a priest in training. I could be wrong in everything I say. Slap me if needed.

    The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one. Mr. Spock

  21. #21
    Gassho and thank you


    Daizan
    sat today

    ...love the painting of the dying Buddha in the OP.
    As a trainee I ask that all comments by me on matters of Dharma be taken with "a grain of salt".

  22. #22
    Thank you Jundo, Kyonin and everyone, including ancestors and loved ones that were with us tonight. ❤️
    Gassho
    Jakuden
    SatToday


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
    清 道 寂田
    SEIDO JAKUDEN
    I am a novice priest. Any resemblance my posts may have to actual teachings about the Dharma, living or dead, is purely coincidental (and just my attempt to be helpful).

  23. #23
    Thanks to all.


    Gassho
    Myosha
    sat today

  24. #24
    Thank you Jundo and everyone.

    Gassho,
    Washin
    sat

  25. #25

  26. #26
    Thanks everyone!

    _/\_
    Ade

    Sat today



    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk

  27. #27
    Thanks everyone, lovely ceremony.
    My friend joined us for her first zazenkai - don't think she was expecting the Hokey Kokey... : )
    Gassho,
    Enjaku
    援若

  28. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Enjaku View Post
    My friend joined us for her first zazenkai - don't think she was expecting the Hokey Kokey... : )
    Got to keep yah on your toes. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    s@today
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

    As a trainee priest, please take any commentary by me on matters of the Dharma with a pinch of salt.

  29. #29
    Awesome. Thank you dear Sangha!

    Gassho
    Byōkan
    sat today

  30. #30
    Will be sitting this one tonight.
    Gassho,
    Matt

  31. #31
    Sat this one with all sentient beings alive or dead.
    I'm going to look a little more into Obon to learn about it.
    I am married to a gal who's family hails from Mexico and the Dia de los Muertes (Day of the Dead) is a big deal down there.
    It's a little Mardi Gras mixed with a little Halloween but it's all about remembering the ones we love who have died.
    Wondering if there are any parallels; there are many celebrations that honor the deceased across many different cultures.
    Anyway, it's important to acknowledge who came before us and offer gratitude for the opportunities they have provided us.
    As seen on gravestones: Sum quod eris, fui quod sis.
    "I am what you will be; I was what you are."

    Gassho,
    Hoko
    #SatToday
    Last edited by Hoko; 02-07-2017 at 01:01 AM.
    法 Dharma
    口 Mouth

  32. #32
    Wonderful ceremony! I sat this for my best friend who passed away last year around this time.

    For all the wonderful memories that resurfaced, I thank you.

    Gassho,
    Hotetsu

    SatToday

    Sent from my LGMS330 using Tapatalk
    Forever is so very temporary...

  33. #33
    Thank you all.

    Gassho,
    Kotei sattoday.
    古庭 KoTei / Ralf

  34. #34
    Thank you Jundo, Kyonin and everyone. I Sat with all of You here and with all ancestors and loved ones. I am very grateful for that.
    Peace for everyone.
    Gassho, Gokai
    SatToday

  35. #35
    Finally sat with this zazenkai. Thank you, Jundo, Kyonin and everybody else.

    Gassho,
    Onkai
    SatToday

  36. #36
    I have listened to the Dharma Cast and very much wanted to participate,and I have seem so many friends there. Other people I do not recognize--so I'll give it a go tonight--I will tell you that for me it is the passing of my step-mom, and especially my mother!

    Tai Shi
    std
    Gassho
    For the end is to know the beginning, to know the beginning is to know the end for the first time.

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