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Thread: February 6th, 2016 - SPECIAL "NEHAN-E" 4-hour ZAZENKAI!

  1. #1

    February 6th, 2016 - SPECIAL "NEHAN-E" 4-hour ZAZENKAI!

    READINGS FOR TODAY'S DHARMA TALK ARE BELOW IN THIS THREAD.


    WELCOME to our Memorial & Celebration of NEHAN-E, (Pari-Nirvana) the traditional day to mark the historical Buddha's death and passing from this visible world. This is also a day for each of us to remember in our homes those family and friends who have gone before. As well, we particularly mark the passing of Nishijima Gudo Wafu and Rempo Niwa Zenji ...


    During this Zazenkai, we will commence with SPECIAL CHANTS & a CEREMONY to recall our parents, grand-parents, siblings, our relatives near and distant, all our ancestors reaching back through the generations, and our dear friends and other cherished ones who have passed.

    This Zazenkai will be netcast LIVE 8am to noon Japan time Saturday morning (that is New York 6pm to 10pm, Los Angeles 3pm to 7pm (Friday night), London 11pm to 3am and Paris midnight to 4am (early Saturday morning)) ... and visible at the following link during those times ...

    ... to be visible on the below screen during those times and any time thereafter ...

    LIVE ZAZENKAI NETCAST at GOOGLE+ IS HERE:
    CLICK ON THE TAB ON LOWER RIGHT FOR 'FULL SCREEN


    To mark this time, our Ceremony at the start of the Zazenkai will include a chanting of “The Verse of Homage to Buddha's Relics, Shariraimon” and Heart Sutra in Chinese-Japanese (to mark our "roots"). Words and details are HERE, please print out if you wish.

    Our sitting schedule for the 4-hour gathering will be as follows ...

    00:00 - 00:50 CEREMONY (SHARIRAIMON in ENGLISH / HEART SUTRA in JAPANESE) & ZAZEN
    00:50 - 01:00 KINHIN
    01:00 - 01:30 ZAZEN
    01:30 - 01:40 KINHIN

    01:40 - 02:30 DHARMA TALK & ZAZEN
    02:30 - 02:40 KINHIN

    02:40 - 03:15 ZAZEN
    03:15 - 03:30 KINHIN
    03:30 - 04:00 METTA CHANT & ZAZEN, VERSE OF ATONEMENT, FOUR VOWS, & CLOSING


    For this special Zazenkai, a statue of the reclining ‘Buddha Entering Parinirvana’, and a Plaque dedicated to all past Generations of Zen Ancestors, will be given special prominence on the Altar.

    As always, we close with the 'Metta Chant', followed at the end with the 'Verse of Atonement' and 'The Four Vows'.


    I STRONGLY SUGGEST THAT YOU POSITION YOUR ZAFU ON THE FLOOR IN A PLACE WHERE YOU ARE NOT STARING DIRECTLY AT THE COMPUTER SCREEN, BUT CAN GLANCE OVER AND SEE THE SCREEN WHEN NECESSARY. YOUR ZAFU SHOULD ALSO BE IN A POSITION WHERE YOU CAN SEE THE COMPUTER SCREEN WHILE STANDING IN FRONT OF THE ZAFU FOR THE CEREMONIES, AND HAVE ROOM FOR BOWING AND KINHIN.

    ALSO, REMEMBER TO SET YOUR COMPUTER (& SCREEN SAVER) SO THAT IT DOES NOT SHUT OFF DURING THE 4 HOURS.


    I hope you will join us ... an open Zafu is waiting. When we drop all thought of 'here' 'there' 'now' 'then' ... we are sitting all together!


    Gassho, Jundo
    Last edited by Sekishi; 02-12-2016 at 04:32 AM. Reason: Added podcast link.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  2. #2
    Our readings will be "Death Poems" (brighter than it sounds!) by various Zen Priests and others, some well known and some not. The writing of a poem at the time of one's death, reflecting on life and the nature of death in an impermanent, transitory world, is an old tradition in the Japanese, Korean and Chinese Zen World (most of the following translations and commentary are by Yoel Hoffman) ...

    ZOSO ROYO
    Died on the fifth day of the sixth month, 1276 at the age of eighty- four

    I pondered Buddha's teaching
    A full four and eighty years.
    The gates are all now locked about me.
    No one was ever here--
    Who then is he about to die,
    And why lament for nothing?
    Farewell!
    The night is clear,
    The moon shines calmly,
    The wind in the pines
    Is like a lyre's song.
    With no I and no other
    Who hears the sound?

    ZOSAN JUNKU
    Died on the fifth day of the fifth month, 1309 at the age of seventy-six

    You must play
    The tune of non-being yourself--
    Nine summits collapse
    Eight oceans go dry.

    The "tune of non-being" does not refer to death, but to a state wherein the enlightened awareness is no longer bound by such polarities as life and death (being vs. not being). "Nine summits" separated by "eight oceans" represent the world as pictured in Indian myth. The tallest mountain, Mount Shumi, stands in the center, surrounded by the eight other peaks. Death is here described as a cosmic event, together with the consciousness that the world and all within it disappears.

    YAKUO TOKUKEN
    Died on the nineteenth day of the fifth month, 1320 at the age of seventy-six

    My six and seventy years are through.
    I was not born, I am not dead.
    Clouds floating on the high wide skies
    The moon curves through its million-mile course.

    Two days before his death, Yakuo called his fellow monks together and said, "The words of a man before he dies are no small matter. This is a barrier that all must pass through. Tell me each of you what you think about that." The monks answered in various ways, and Yakuo neither approved nor disapproved. The next day he ordered his pupils to burn his body and forbade them to hold an elaborate burial ceremony. "Tomorrow morning," he said, "I shall eat the rice porridge with you for breakfast, and at noon I shall go." The following day at noon he wrote his final words, threw the brush from his hand, and died sitting upright.

    DAIDO ICHI'I
    Died on the twenty-sixth day of the second month, 1370 at the age of seventy-nine

    A tune of non-being
    Filling the void:
    Spring sun
    Snow whiteness
    Bright clouds
    Clear wind.

    UNGO KIYO

    Died on the eighth day of the eighth month, 1659 at the age of seventy-seven

    I came into the world after Buddha.
    I leave the world before Miroku.
    Between the Buddha of the beginning
    and the Buddha of the end
    I am not born, I do not die.

    TOSUI UNKEI
    Died on the nineteenth day of the ninth month, 1683 past the age of seventy

    Seventy years and more
    I have tasted life to its utmost.
    The stench of urine sticks to my bones.
    What matter all these?
    Ho! Where is the place I return to?
    Above the peak the moonlight whitens
    A clear wind blows.

    TAKUAN SOHO
    Died on the eleventh day of the twelfth month, 1645 at the age of seventy-three

    Lying on his deathbed, Takuan at first refused to write a death poem. At last he gave in to the entreaties of those surrounding him, took up his brush, and drew the character for "dream," .... When he finished, he threw the brush down and died. Takuan had requested beforehand that his body be burned on a mountain, that no burial service be held, and that no tombstone be put up for him.

    TAIGEN SOFU

    Died on the tenth day of the intercalary month, 1555 at the age of sixty

    I raise the mirror of my life
    Up to my face: sixty years.
    With a swing I smash the reflection--
    The world as usual
    All in its place.

    SHUN'OKU SOEN
    Died on the ninth day of the second month, 1611 at the age of eighty-three

    Adrift between the earth and sky
    I call to the east and change it to west.
    I flourish my staff and return once again
    To my source.
    Katsu!

    MUSO SOSEKI
    Died on the thirtieth day of the ninth month, 1351 at the age of seventy-seven

    Thus have I rolled my life throughout
    Inside and out, reclined, upright.
    What is all this?
    A beating drum
    A trumpet's blare
    No more.

    MUSHO JOSHO
    Died on the fifteenth day of the fifth month, 1306 at the age of seventy-three

    When it comes-- just so!
    When it goes-- just so!
    Both coming and going occur each day.
    The words I am speaking now-- just so!

    The sources tell us that on the day of his death, Musho summoned the other monks, arranged for his burial service, said his last words, and died sitting upright.

    "Just so!" or "Thus!" ( nyoze ) is a cry used by the Zen master to direct his pupil's attention to "things as they are" or to indicate that the student sees things clearly.

    MUMON GENSEN
    Died on the twenty-second day of the third month, 1390 at the age of sixty-eight

    Life is an ever- rolling wheel
    And every day is the right one.
    He who recites poems at his death
    Adds frost to snow.

    KOZAN ICHIKYO
    Died on the twelfth day of the second month, 1360 at the age of seventy-seven

    Empty- handed I entered the world
    Barefoot I leave it.
    My coming, my going--
    Two simple happenings
    That got entangled.

    KOGETSU SOGAN
    Died on the first day of the tenth month, 1643 at the age of seventy

    Katsu !
    Katsu !
    Katsu !
    Katsu !

    The word katsu cannot really be translated conceptually. It is a sharp cry used by the Zen teacher and pupil at the moment of enlightenment. The cry appears in many Chinese and Japanese Zen writings and can be heard even today within monastery walls.

    HOSSHIN
    Thirteenth century

    Coming, all is clear, no doubt about it.
    Going, all is clear, without a doubt.
    What, then, is it all?

    GIZAN ZENRAI
    Died on the twenty-eighth day of March, 1878 at the age of seventy-seven

    I was born into this world
    I leave it at my death.
    Into a thousand towns
    My legs have carried me,
    And countless homes--
    What are all these?
    A moon reflected in the water
    A flower floating in the sky
    Ho!

    "Ho!" is a translation of the word totsu, a kind of challenging cry uttered at the moment of enlightenment.

    GIUN
    The 5th abbot of Eiheiji. Died on the twelfth day of the tenth month, 1333 at the age of eighty-one

    All doctrines split asunder
    Zen teaching cast away--
    Fourscore years and one.
    The sky now cracks and falls
    The earth cleaves open--
    In the heart of the fire
    Lies a hidden spring.

    Dogen Zenji (d. 1253)

    Fifty-four years lighting up the sky.
    A quivering leap smashes a billion worlds.
    Hah!
    Entire body looks for nothing.
    Living, I plunge into Yellow Springs.

    Steve Stucky (2014)


    This human body truly is the entire cosmos
    Each breath of mine, is equally one of yours, my darling
    This tender abiding in "my" life
    Is the fierce glowing fire of inner earth
    Linking with all pre-phenomena
    Flashing to the distant horizon
    From "right here now" to "just this"
    Now the horizon itself
    Drops away—
    Bodhi!
    Svaha.

    * * *
    Last edited by Jundo; 02-06-2016 at 09:00 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  3. #3
    I will be there

    Gassho,

    Kyonin
    Please remember I am only a priest in training. I could be wrong in everything I say. Slap me if needed.

    The needs of the many outweigh the needs of the few, or the one. Mr. Spock

  4. #4
    I am sad to be missing this, but so thankful that I will be able to sit with it next week! These poems are fascinating and moving.

    Gassho,
    Jakuden
    SatToday
    serene
    ​field

  5. #5
    I won't be able to join in for the entire 4 hrs, but will join in when I can.

    Gassho,
    Joyo
    about to sit.........

  6. #6
    I will try to be there 2-way.

    Gassho,
    Onkai (Lauriie)

  7. #7
    I'll be sitting the recorded version.

    Gassho,

    Risho
    -sattoday

  8. #8
    I'll be joining later with the recorded version.

    Love the death poems! A great read if you are interested:

    http://www.amazon.com/Japanese-Death.../dp/0804831793

    Gassho
    Byōkan
    sat today

  9. #9
    Thank you everyone for the Nehan-E zazenkai. A special thanks to those who restored the forums. That looks like an interesting book, Byokan.

    Gassho,
    Onkai (Laurie)

  10. #10
    Thank you everyone, have a great weekend. =)

    Gassho
    Shingen

    #sattoday
    RINDO SHINGEN
    倫道 真現

    As a trainee priest, please take any commentary by me on matters of the Dharma with a pinch of salt.

  11. #11
    Thank you everyone. I appreciate that I could at least get an hr of practicing with you all.

    Gassho,
    Joyo
    sat today

  12. #12
    Thank you all.

    Gassho
    Sergey
    sat-today

  13. #13
    Thanks to all.


    Gassho
    Myosha sat today

  14. #14
    Thanks everyone.

    Jundo, thanks for this time to pause and remember those who came before.

    Biology footnote: I believe Japan has two species of crow...the giant crow like bird is probably a Raven "knocking at your door". If they are priests returning that explains a lot because they are very intelligent birds!

    Gassho
    Doshin
    Sattoday

  15. #15
    Thank you all.

    Beautiful poems, certainly worth a read, thanks Byokan.

    Jundo, thank you for adding frost on snow.

    Gassho
    Jika
    #sattoday
    治 Ji
    花 Ka

  16. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Doshin View Post
    Thanks everyone.

    Jundo, thanks for this time to pause and remember those who came before.

    Biology footnote: I believe Japan has two species of crow...the giant crow like bird is probably a Raven "knocking at your door". If they are priests returning that explains a lot because they are very intelligent birds!

    Gassho
    Doshin
    Sattoday
    Tokyo crows are pretty smart.



    Gassho, J

    SatToday
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

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