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Thread: BOOK OF EQUANIMITY - Case 44

  1. #1

    BOOK OF EQUANIMITY - Case 44

    Case 43 never ends, yet now comes ...

    Case 44: Koyo's Garuda Bird

    http://books.google.co.jp/books?id=i...20Bird&f=false

    One practical point when reading anything like today's Koan is that Chinese "Chan/Zen speak" of certain historical periods (in trying to convey some things hard to convey in ordinary words) developed its own literary styles, inner puns and jokes, standard allusions (like "dragon and garuda" "king and general" or "host and guest" as code words for the "absolute and relative") and other symbols. Although the central lessons must not be lost, the great distance of time and cultures, and the resulting gap in shared cultural references and language may actually make some phrases more "mystical and mysterious" than they were at the time to readers who recognized the references, "got the puns" and the shared code. Often Zen phrases seem "cryptic", mysterious and profound simply because many old Zen stories were written in 1000 year old "slang", citing forgotten Chinese legends (like the references to dragons fighting garudas in the lines below) or poetic references, all of which was sometimes then poorly translated or remembered over the years! It is as if I were to create a Koan now using such 'Americanism' terms as "bling-bling", "shake your booty", "here goes nothing", "Thomas the Tank Engine" (Britishism) and "Casey at the bat" and expect folks 1000 years from now in Lithuania to "get the reference". They might take "Bling Bling" to be a mysterious Mantra thought to have fantastic magical powers.

    Side Note: Much of the "weird, poetic language" we use around Treeleaf sometimes is an attempt to update, modernize and simplify some of the old ways of putting things for modern, Western people. Rather than talk about some ancient Chinese Kingdoms and Dragons, I talk about "Paris and Boeing Jets" or the like.

    However ... it will always need to be a bit weird and poetic BECAUSE IT IS ZEN!!!! and still needs to get beyond and through-and-through language.


    So, let us turn to today's Koan, and try to distinguish the "profound point" from the "poetic puff and puns" ...

    A young monk goes to test an older master, a traditional challenge called "Dharma Combat". As Shishin Wick points out, "the dragon-king [is] the complete ruler of all the oceans ... all-powerful and invulnerable" in that realm. Thus, when the young fellows says "the dragon-king leaves the ocean and heaven and earth are calm" he probably means that he has had some kind of great breakthrough which he feels has everything in life resolved and under control, king of the world. But the garuda bird likes to make lunch of dragons! So, the master is probably saying, "Oh yeah? Well, take it off the cushion buddy, and see if life doesn't make lunch of your little insight!" (In my eyes, one only knows the value of this Zen Way and all learned "on the cushion" by seeing how it plays in life, where the runner meets the road. You want to test your "insight"? See how you do the next time the doctor hands you an unpleasant diagnosis, your company downsizes, or the car just gets a flat!)

    I take the reference to "a falcon seizing a dove" and "check in front of the balcony" (according to Shishin, the place where prisoner's heads are put on display on a pike ) to mean something like, "It is a dog eat dog world out there, and life takes no prisoners. If you truly are the "ruler" who has resolved all, then you have to learn the great power and peace of dancing with life's tough birds of prey. As Shishin says so powerfully ...

    When you rise from the zafu, what is the one thing (or are there many?) that spoils your tranquility and invincibility? Is it the girlfriend Garuda, the boss Garuda, the baby Garuda, the ex-spouse Garuda ... ?
    After the young monk says something about humbly surrendering and backing down (retreating three steps with his hands on his chest), the master says something like "learn from this and don't be so blind and naive next time" (the blind turtle stuck under Mt. Sumeru etc.).

    You see, this is another Koan about the dance and interplay of nirvana and samsara, the lotus emerging from the mud, the absolute and relative: Most of the other references in the Preface and Appreciative Verse are to this, such as "host and guest". In old Zen lingo, host is generally "Emptiness/Absolute" and guest "form/separate phenomena"

    These two might also be described as the real and apparent, upright and inclined, universal and particular, ultimate and phenomenal, oneness and many, or absolute and relative, and are frequently suggested in Chan discourse by the metaphors of host and guest or lord and vassal.
    http://www.ancientdragon.org/dharma/...ng_of_suchness
    And such is the dragon and garuda, soaring and crawling, king and minister, emperor and general and the like.

    So QUESTION: What are your Garuda birds, and do they dance with the dragon ... or eat the dragon ... these days?

    One final note:

    I find the first part of Shishin Wick's commentary clear and insightful. However, I must also note that Shishin is in the Lineage of Yasutani Roshi, and they Practice a Soto-Rinzai hybrid that is heavily influenced by the "hard charge" to Kensho of that particular Teacher. For this reason, Yasutani emphasized an incredibly intense version of Shikantaza that is not so common outside that Lineage, but comes through in some of Shishin's description of Yasutani Roshi here. Maybe the most striking example of Yasutani Roshi's Shikantaza is this famous talk by him in which he speaks of Shikantaza as a means of intense concentration leading to an explosive Kensho ...

    When you thoroughly practice shikantaza you will sweat-even in the winter. Such intensely heightened alertness of mind cannot be maintained for long periods of time. ... Sit with such intensely heightened concentration, patience, and alertness that if someone were to touch you while you are sitting, there would be an electrical spark! Sitting thus, you return naturally to the original Buddha, the very nature of your being.

    Then, almost anything can plunge you into the sudden realization that all beings are originally buddhas and all existence is perfect from the beginning. Experiencing this is called enlightenment. Personally experiencing this is as vivid as an explosion; regardless of how well you know the theory of explosions, only an actual explosion will do anything. In the same manner, no matter how much you know about enlightenment, until you actually experience it, you will not be intimately aware of yourself as Buddha.

    In short, shikantaza is the actual practice of buddhahood itself from the very beginning-and, in diligently practicing shikantaza, when the time comes, one will realize that very fact.

    However, to practice in this manner can require a long time to attain enlightenment, and such practice should never be discontinued until one fully realizes enlightenment. Even after attaining great enlightenment and even if one becomes a roshi, one must continue to do shikantaza forever, simply because shikantaza is the actualization of enlightenment itself.
    http://www.dailyzen.com/zen/zen_reading0903.asp

    It is a very instrumental and goal oriented view of Shikantaza. In fact, many or most of the Western Teachers in that Lineages seem to have softened a bit in their approach from Yasutani's fire and brimstone, but they still tend to present Shikantaza in a rather instrumental way that is found in some of what Shishin says here.

    Gassho, J

    Last edited by Jundo; 07-08-2014 at 03:37 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  2. #2
    Senior Member Myosha's Avatar
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    Hello,

    The koan: Don't walk away from Truth (schmuck!)

    The question: If Garudas are analogous to the ineffable then (according to Chinese calender) yours truly is a dancing-partner dragon.


    Gassho,
    Myosha
    Practice with humility, respect all beings, avoid attachments, give rise to prajŮa from your own awareness, put an end to delusions - Hui-neng

  3. #3
    I might also mention something else found in this Koan, a phenomenon found all over the Buddhist internet ...

    ... It is the fellow who has had some insight on the cushion, perhaps some sense of dropping of subject-object, Emptiness and Wholeness, who now thinks he is "God's Gift to Buddhism", that he has "Got It!" and the cake is baked. Such people often can be found around the Buddha-net setting everyone straight, talking in mysterious Zen riddles and proclaiming themself the new "Seventh Ancestor" or the like.

    Well, I am here to say that the cake is half baked.

    While such Insights, big and small, wide and shallow, are vital to this Practice, fast or slow in coming (yet always in each timeless instant) ... the Absolute must meet the Relative, the Host must welcome the Guest. Unless one comes to put such "into Practice", where the Buddha rubber meets the samsaric road ... such is perhaps "enlightenment" but not "Enlightenment!". The mud is just mud without the Lotus. The Lotus alone is beautiful but lacking life. One when the mud and Lotus arise as one, is the Practice truly Realized.

    The garuda by herself is just anger, greed, divisive thoughts of ignorance. The dragon by herself is just swimming around in circles, lazily in its lare. Coming together, something like this perhaps, all in dancing balance like (although not a strictly Buddhist concept) Yin-Yang ...



    Take it off the cushion buddy!

    Gassho, J
    Last edited by Jundo; 07-08-2014 at 03:32 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  4. #4
    Senior Member Clark's Avatar
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    This "holiday" weekend, our washing machine broke-Ka Ching( no that wasn't a zen bell), new curtains were the wrong size and had to be the next 2 sizes up- Ka Ching ( 2nd bell still not very zen), this morning my wife's car wouldn't start - Ka Ching ( 3rd bell nope not even close). Garuda Bird came to roost this weekend and ate up all manner of Dragons. I go back to my cushion so I can get off my cushion.

    PS Not looking for sympathy just honestly answering the question

    On the positive side I used to have a big problem with loosing stuff and not being able to find it. Now I just have a problem with it Not quite at problem/mo problem. Maybe never.

    Gassho
    C

  5. #5
    Broken washing machine and ill fitting curtains are small garuda bird ... kinda cute garuda bird ...





    Gassho, Jundo
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  6. #6
    "Sometimes you eat the Bear, and well ... Sometimes he eats you." - The Stranger from The Big Lebowski

    Any time I separate myself from things, expect from them, meet the ten thousand things rather than let them express themselves and meet me... The other Garudas in my way on the road, the Garuda bugs in my code, the Garuda homeless who always want my stuff....

    There is nothing to get because this life is alive. I dont want a shallow piece of insight that fixes my problems when the world is aflame in need with my bros and sisters suffering. Not to sound cliche but its true. I am out there starving or addicted to drugs or abusing my kids or stopping some race from living as human beings. The Garuda cant stick out its head if we arent apart.

    We are all the cause of this craziness and we heal ourselves by taking responsibility within and part of it. When we try to escape the garuda appears and we cut off our head. Fortunately we are alive so we can try again and fail and try...

    Gassho

    Risho

  7. #7
    Maybe this is off the mark, but it is what comes to mind.... The dragon is vain and proud and a bit ridiculous, and his Garuda bird is named Jennifer. She saw through his vanity and pride long ago, and found his ridiculousness only adorable. There is another Garuda bird called William...

    The dragon is surrounded by Garuda birds. It is like a dew worm in a yard full of robins.

    Gassho Daizan
    大山

  8. #8
    A modern spin ...



    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Clark View Post
    This "holiday" weekend, our washing machine broke-Ka Ching( no that wasn't a zen bell), new curtains were the wrong size and had to be the next 2 sizes up- Ka Ching ( 2nd bell still not very zen), this morning my wife's car wouldn't start - Ka Ching ( 3rd bell nope not even close). Garuda Bird came to roost this weekend and ate up all manner of Dragons. I go back to my cushion so I can get off my cushion.
    By the way, reminds me of one of my favorite country songs ... except for the "off the wagon" part ...



    Gassho, J
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  10. #10
    Senior Member Clark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    By the way, reminds me of one of my favorite country songs ... except for the "off the wagon" part ...



    Gassho, J

    Yep that's exactly it. It is life, and yet these little baby Garuda hatchlings really got under my skin this week... even though part of me is watching myself be ridiculous, I somehow couldn't shake it. I never said I was proud, just aware of my folly. Fortunately I am not typing this from the bar however. It's funny, because some of the BIG Garudas in my life I have handled quite well, but it's these day to day annoyances that seem to throw me for a loop. Taking advice from Dory ( from the movie, Finding Nemo) Just keep swimming, just keep swimming

    Gassho
    C

  11. #11
    I needed that song. Thanks Jundo.

    Gassho,
    John

  12. #12
    Senior Member Amelia's Avatar
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    When the birds come, my sky is blasted a bit and I tell myself not to think about it: it's the thoughts that make me suffer, not the actions I must take. The fracture often mends.
    迎 Geika

  13. #13
    It's funny, because some of the BIG Garudas in my life I have handled quite well, but it's these day to day annoyances that seem to throw me for a loop
    Big garudas can be easy to spot and tend to only come occasionally. For me too, it is the apparent ceaseless pecking of the little garudas that annoy the dragon.

    This morning children garudas wouldn't leave each other alone. So many raised voices, hitting, thrown lunchboxes *sigh*

    Gassho
    Andy

  14. #14
    Hi All,

    Yep. A couple weeks ago a huge tree fell on my vehicle, which I need for my work. Nope, I did not have insurance for that. The nearest fix-it place is a 200 mile tow from where I live. Going to town takes time, and a night or two in a hotel, and $$ spent while no income is coming in, plus letting down customers who rely on my business, which will be piling up while Iím gone...not to mention the why-me factor... I could have freaked out. But I felt no sense of catastrophe, and just took care of what needed to be done to get the vehicle on the road again. Trees fall, and thereís no reason they shouldnít. I was truly thankful that it did not hurt anyone. And now I donít ever have to worry about a tree falling on my car again, because who has 2 trees fall on their car? Ahh, equanimity, the sweet fruit of practice.

    But then... yesterday my sweetie made himself a sandwich and left crumbs and a few tomato seeds on the counter. I had murder in my heart.


    Itís the little things for me too. I have a looooong way to go.


    Gassho
    Lisa

  15. #15
    Senior Member Shawn's Avatar
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    Just my silly attemp here don't mind me.

    My three year old son Alex has a book called "Pete the cat and his four groovy buttons." Each time a button falls off, the question "did Pete cry?" The answer, "goodness no, buttons come and buttons go!"

    Pete is far more wise then dad.

    For me as well, it's the small things.

    How a fellow can get to it, when the entire septic system fails and needs to be replaced (costs as much as a minivan!), weeks and weeks of getting quotes, no water, no bathroom, no laundry (two kids!). Just do it.

    And yet his wife asks him to clean the shower, and those Garuda birds swoop in for the kill.

    Gassho, Shawn
    Last edited by Shawn; 07-09-2014 at 12:27 PM.
    I am relatively new to zen. Please keep that in mind and take what I say with a truck load of salt.

  16. #16
    Senior Member Clark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raindrop View Post
    But then... yesterday my sweetie made himself a sandwich and left crumbs and a few tomato seeds on the counter. I had murder in my heart.


    It’s the little things for me too. I have a looooong way to go.


    Gassho
    Lisa
    I don't believe that for one second

    Gassho
    C

  17. #17
    Hi Clark,

    haha, oh believe it my friend!

    Gassho
    Lisa

  18. #18
    Hi all,

    small garuda's, Big Garudas...

    A few months ago I was ready to quit my band. Now this band provides for half or my income and I have invested nine years of my life and loads of (scarce) money in it. For me it was a huge decision to quit. Yet I felt I had no choice anymore, since things did not go the way I wanted them to go, the way I aimed for them to go for nine years.

    I decided I should 'let go' (and found that a very Zen thing to do ) Even my wife was glad I finally left Garuda Mountain!

    So I wrote an e-mail to the band that contained all my frustrations, and my decision to leave those behind.

    Instead of an answer from the bandmembers, I received an invitation to go and have a beer. Which we did. And we had such a great evening! We talked a lot. Nothing changed that night, nothing!
    Yet the next morning, and still, I found that Garuda Mountain was not Garuda Mountain anymore. I let go of the need to let go.

    No Garudas, No Dragons, dragons are Dragons. Garudas are garudas.


    Gassho
    Vincent

    * starts packing his climbing gear
    For a moment, nothing happened. Then, after a second or so, nothing continued to happen.

  19. #19
    Garundas? Dragons? The surest place for the garundas to swoop in is around my family, bless 'em.
    Oh yeah, also when I'm not around my family. hahahahah
    Shinzan

  20. #20
    Hi.

    On Treeleaf there is an priest who always says "its all good practice".
    Sometimes i just want to walk up and give him an hug, sometimes...
    But he's right, its all good practice.
    Sometimes you rumble, sometimes you run, all part of life.

    Thank you for your practice

    Mtfbwy
    Fugen
    Treeleaf Unsui
    Blog: http://fugenblog.blogspot.com/

  21. #21
    Quote Originally Posted by Fugen View Post
    Hi.

    On Treeleaf there is an priest who always says "its all good practice".
    Sometimes i just want to walk up and give him an hug, sometimes...
    But he's right, its all good practice.
    Sometimes you rumble, sometimes you run, all part of life.

    Thank you for your practice

    Mtfbwy
    Fugen
    Hello,

    Wow, you too eh ... I have heard of that priest! =)

    Yes, all god practice!

    Gassho
    Shingen
    倫道 真現

    As a trainee priest, please take any commentary by me on matters of the Dharma with a pinch of salt.

  22. #22
    Hi there,

    Time to come out. I came to Treeleaf after about a year of koan work with another sangha. I'd come to the conclusion koan work was not for me. But after only a few weeks, it seemed clear that it wasn't a matter of one practice vs. another. It was just my defenses applied to a variety of circumstances. Koan work, Shikantaza, at one level it's all the same. Going to be problems. So thinking that I had run away from something rather than run to something, I returned to the old sangha for a sesshin minus the anxieties that had been present before. This time I had no idea what would happen in dokusan, and at one level it didn't matter. No expectations. I was just there, just sitting with my friends. Very little analysis (very unusual for me since I was trained as a scientist). And this time it was so different. I strolled through the koans like walking in a gentle stream. What had been impossibly obtuse was now pretty obvious. No fireworks but a lot of quiet tears and laughter. Two weeks later I attended another sesshin, and this was much the same. I felt like I'd come home.

    At that point I appreciated Treeleaf, I appreciated the old sangha, I appreciated the daily sits, and I appreciated my life. It was all good. I was swimming with the dragons. Not proud, but very content.

    Then in fly the garudas. In droves like shrapnel. Medical problems in my family. Medical problems with a key player at work. Financial difficulties with my grown children. Cars breaking down. Grandchildren losing their daycare. Conflicts with extended family. The prospects of a pesky deposition. At first I waved them aside like mosquitoes. I can handle this, it's okay. But it was as if I was in a video game; each problem handled would up the ante to another level. "If that doesn't bother you, let's try this!" By now all rosy glow from the sesshins was gone, but still I maintained equanimity. After all, this is what it's all about "where the rubber meets the road." It's okay. I'm still sitting.

    Two days ago I woke with a new thought: "None of this is worth a damn! I'm going down the tube." That was and is a very real feeling. It may be nothing more than a passing thought, insubstantial. But it sure as hell feels real. None of the platitudes - those I say to myself or read -- seem to help at all. Even sitting is a momentary respite.

    So I'm reaching out for support. I'm an old guy, and I've been through some battles. I know "this too shall pass." But I don't really think its just passing will be of much use. It seems somehow integrally related to what went before. Peaks and valleys. I'd like not only to survive this, but to learn how to ride it better. Pretty sure it's going to happen over and over.

    Guess that's my presentation of this koan. I'd appreciate your comments.

    Gassho,
    John
    Last edited by John H; 07-12-2014 at 06:39 PM.

  23. #23
    Peaks and valleys, life, Samsara. It is your Karrma or just where life is right now.

    See through the peaks and valleys. I know it is hard.

    It is always hard when it is one's own life. You know the story of the mustard seed and Kisa Ghotami? Show me a house that is always passed over. **

    I also remind folks that, in Zazen, we also feel a kind of Great Gratitude toward the ups and downs in life which does not always manifest necessarily as an obvious feeling of gratitude. What is the difference between gratitude and Great Gratitude seen in a Buddha's Eye?

    http://www.treeleaf.org/forums/showt...reat-Gratitude

    I will sit and offer Metta for you. Beyond that, not much to say.

    Gassho, J

    **
    When her son died just a few years into his life, Kisa Gotami went mad with grief. A wise person saw her condition and told her to find the Buddha, who had the medicine she needed. Kisa Gotami went to the Buddha, and asked him to give her the medicine that would restore her dead child to life. The Buddha told her to go out and find a mustard seed from a house where nobody had died. Kisa Gotami was heartened, and began her search, going door to door. Everyone was willing to give her a mustard seed, but every household she encountered had seen at least one death. She understood why the Buddha had sent her on this quest. She returned to the Buddha, who confirmed what she had realized: "There is no house where such does not come."
    Last edited by Jundo; 07-12-2014 at 07:30 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  24. #24
    Thank you, Jundo

    Gassho,
    John

  25. #25
    Hi All,

    I have to say I agree with John H. None of this is worth a damn. And yes it is going to happen over and over. We may gain great insight and equanimity, but the wheel doesn’t stop turning. Work, eat, shit, meditate, sleep, brush your teeth again, easy times come, then hard times, work, eat, shit, meditate, sleep, brush your teeth again. Why bother? I mean really, why? I can’t answer that.


    I think you have to either opt in or not. It seems meaningless to weigh the “good” times against the “bad”. Garuda will always dance with the dragon. Don’t stand outside the door. Go in and join the dance. My move is the twist, it works for me. Maybe your move is the macarena or the moonwalk. The band won’t always play your favorite song, and sometimes you’ll lose the beat and look like an idiot. It's ok. If you get tired, sit down and have some punch and watch for awhile. Anyway all your friends are there, and that's nice. Eventually the dance will end and you’ll say where did the night go?


    As Peggy Lee sang:


    Is that all there is?
    Is that all there is?
    If that’s all there is my friends
    Then lets keep dancing
    Metta for all of us, enjoy the dance,
    Gassho
    Lisa
    Last edited by raindrop; 07-12-2014 at 08:41 PM.

  26. #26
    Thanks Lisa. "Don't stand outside the door. Go in and join the dance." "...opt in or out." Shit or get off the pot.

    Gassho,
    John

  27. #27
    Senior Member Joyo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by raindrop View Post
    Hi All,

    I have to say I agree with John H. None of this is worth a damn. And yes it is going to happen over and over. We may gain great insight and equanimity, but the wheel doesn’t stop turning. Work, eat, shit, meditate, sleep, brush your teeth again, easy times come, then hard times, work, eat, shit, meditate, sleep, brush your teeth again. Why bother? I mean really, why? I can’t answer that.


    I think you have to either opt in or not. It seems meaningless to weigh the “good” times against the “bad”. Garuda will always dance with the dragon. Don’t stand outside the door. Go in and join the dance. My move is the twist, it works for me. Maybe your move is the macarena or the moonwalk. The band won’t always play your favorite song, and sometimes you’ll lose the beat and look like an idiot. It's ok. If you get tired, sit down and have some punch and watch for awhile. Anyway all your friends are there, and that's nice. Eventually the dance will end and you’ll say where did the night go?


    As Peggy Lee sang:




    Metta for all of us, enjoy the dance,
    Gassho
    Lisa

    Thanks LIsa, this is very helpful.

    Gassho,
    Joyo

  28. #28
    Senior Member Joyo's Avatar
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    Lisa, your post actually reminds me of one of Garth Brooks' songs.....




    Gassho,
    Joyo

  29. #29
    Hi Joyo,

    By the way, that metaphor of the dance is inspired by Jundo's brilliant words, here:

    http://www.treeleaf.org/forums/showt...ighlight=dance

    Thanks for sharing that song, it is beautiful!

    (p.s. That guy's voice reminds me of Chris Gaines)


    Gassho
    Lisa
    Last edited by raindrop; 07-14-2014 at 03:13 AM.

  30. #30
    Thanks to all.

    Gassho,
    John

  31. #31
    Senior Member Kantai's Avatar
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    Hi!
    Right now I've been caught by the Flu Garuda and that's not exactly what I wished for.
    But I'll go with it and see where it drops me of, I don't think it will eat me up.
    Maybe I'll climb up on the birds' back and look at the view from there.

    Gassho
    Kantai

  32. #32
    The Garuda's come and go, that I can't control. It's what I do with them that matters.



    Kind regards. /\
    _/_
    Rich
    MUHYO
    無 (MU, Emptiness) and 氷 (HYO, Ice) ... Emptiness Ice ...

  33. #33
    Senior Member AlanLa's Avatar
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    Love, the unrequited kind. Big damn Garuda. Poke my head out and love a woman and get it taken off by the dragon. Yeah, story of my life. It spins me terrible for a while, rips me to my very worth as a man, deep into my very soul. But then I get back up for the next time, and the next time, and so on…. Love as the source of samsara, as the source of Garuda. Letting it go……… Hmm, love as desire… oh, yeah, right.

    The only answer I've found so far is sun-faced buddha and moon-faced buddha (#36) and surfing in between their waves, which takes lots of practice.
    Last edited by AlanLa; 07-21-2014 at 04:09 AM.
    AL (Jigen) in:
    Faith/Trust
    Courage/Love
    Awareness/Action!

  34. #34
    I'm a walking bird feed.
    On the cushion even as I push the mailcart.
    Bowing the scarecrow.
    "Know that the practice of zazen is the complete path of buddha-dharma and nothing can be compared to it....it is not the practice of one or two buddhas but all the buddha ancestors practice this way."
    Dogen zenji in Bendowa






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