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Thread: Om many padme hum ?

  1. #1
    mohamed zen
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    Om many padme hum ?

    Hi dear teachers

    I have question about this mantra om many padme hum .

    What is mean ?
    What is the benefit from practice it ?

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  2. #2
    Senior Member Sydney's Avatar
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    It's an esoteric mantra I think I've only seen in a Tibetan context, tied to poetic symbolism of a lotus blossom unfolding to reveal a jewel. I find it lovely.

    About the second shortest description of its meaning I've seen is here: http://www.sacred-texts.com/bud/tib/omph.htm

    The shortest was in a book and was preceded by a lot of context material IIRC.
    Diligently attain nothing. Sort of. Best not to over-think it.
    http://gplus.to/sydneytinker

  3. #3
    Hi,

    Yes, "Om mani padme hum" (Om! Hail the Jewel in the Lotus!) is a common mantra in Tibetan Buddhism, although not in Zen Buddhism. If you would like to read a bit more about Mantra, please see this link ...

    Well, I would say that this all depends how one defines a Mantra in one's heart. In much of Buddhism and related religions of India (although something very similar can be found in about all religions really ... e.g., like "God Is Great/Allahu al-Akbar" in Islam, an orthodox Jew's reciting the sacred letters of Torah, or "Praise Jesus" in some corners of Christianity), it is a sound, word or words that create transformation in some way.

    ...

    Nichiren Buddhism (my wife's family are Nichiren Buddhists) is a school of Buddhism which developed in Japan hundreds of years ago centered on the power of the Lotus Sutra ... on the power of faith and recital even in just the name of the Lotus Sutra. Thus, they recite "Nam-myoho-renge-kyo" (Hail the Wonderful Law of the Lotus Flower Sutra). Many Tibetans chant "Om mani padme hum" (Om! Hail the Jewel in the Lotus!). Another school of Buddhism in Asia is the Jodo (Pure Land) school(s), who worship or rely upon Amida Buddha, and thus chant "Namu Amida Butsu" (or its equivalent in Chinese etc., Homage to Amida, Buddha of Infinite Light).

    ...

    In my opinion, of course, seated Zazen is "complete, whole, the only thing needed to do" in that moment of sitting. When we sit, it is very very vital to sit with the attitude sunk deep in one's bones that " there is no other place to be, nothing lacking, not one more thing to do" than this. (We do so because in daily life, running here and there and always feeling some lacks or discontents in life, we rarely if ever undertake one action with total heart and completeness in such way! Thus we call this "non-doing".)

    However, rising from the cushion ... one must come to express Zazen all through daily life. All of daily life is also "Zazen" in its wider meaning. So, if a particular person wished to also chant "Nam-myoho-renge-kyo" or "Namu Amida Butsu" or "Allahu al-Akbar" or "Kwan Seum Bosal" or the Torah or "Praise Jesus" (or "Praise Richard Dawkins" for our atheist members 8) ) ... that is fine. Up to each person in their heart. All Zazen in its wider meaning, as is everything from changing the baby to cooking dinner to sewing a Kesa.

    http://www.treeleaf.org/forums/showt...ll=1#post64240
    Gassho, Jundo
    Last edited by Jundo; 04-07-2014 at 01:53 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

    #SAT TODAY!

  4. #4
    mohamed zen
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    Thank you very much dear master Jundo .

    Deep bow for you

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  5. #5
    Hi Mohammed

    Om mani padme hum is the mantra of the bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara (Tibetan: Chenrezig, Japanese: Kannon) chanted often in Tibetan Buddhism. It is chanted by lay practitioners and monks alike, some practitioners vowing to complete a certain number of mani recitations in a lifetime such as 1 million.

    Om mani padme hum is thought to translate as 'homage to the jewel in the lotus', the lotus flower being a symbol of human striving for enlightenment, being born in the mud and heading for the light at the water's surface, and the jewel being our own buddha nature.

    As others have said, it is not used in Zen but in Tibetan practice it is used to quieten the mind by filling it with devotion (mantra literally means 'mind protector') and also to send compassion to all beings. Many people carry prayer wheels which contain the mantra and it is also put on prayer flags to be carried by the wind to all corners of the earth to remind everyone of their original nature.

    This is a lovely version of the mantra by Ani Choying:

    Gassho/Sarva mangalam
    Andy

  6. #6
    mohamed zen
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    Hi Kokuu . Thank you very much .
    And thanks for Sydney .

    Deep bows for you

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  7. #7
    Thank you Andy - it is lovely.

    Gassho

    Willow

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by mohamed zen View Post
    Thank you very much dear master Jundo .

    Deep bow for you

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    Hi,

    Please just call me "Jundo", though dear is fine. I can be "master" when dead and stop making mistakes one after another.

    Gassho, Jundo, Friend in the Dharma
    Last edited by Jundo; 04-07-2014 at 10:50 AM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

    #SAT TODAY!

  9. #9
    Senior Member kirkmc's Avatar
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    When I was hob-nobbing with the Tibetans, one of the things to do was chant om mani padme hum (pronounced, by them, om mani pemé hung) 108,000 times. Or more. Or to say it silently when meditating. Or to recite it while counting beads on a mala. They use it as a special sauce nearly everywhere. Nothing against the Tibetans, or their practice; just saying that it's omnipresent for them.

    Gassho,

    Kirk

  10. #10
    Senior Member Clark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    Hi,

    Please just call me "Jundo", though dear is fine. I can be "master" when dead and stop making mistakes one after another.

    Gassho, Jundo, Friend in the Dharma
    Will you make mistakes when you are dead? I won't say


    Gassho
    C

  11. #11
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

    #SAT TODAY!

  12. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    Hi,

    Please just call me "Jundo", though dear is fine. I can be "master" when dead and stop making mistakes one after another.

    Gassho, Jundo, Friend in the Dharma
    =)

    Gassho
    Shingen
    倫道 真現

    As a trainee priest, please take any commentary by me on matters of the Dharma with a pinch of salt.

  13. #13
    I read somewhere that chanting the Om mani padme hum mantra or the catholic Rosary ensures that your breathing is around 6 breaths per minute and this then has an amazing impact on brain waves. Being brought up catholic and subjected to Rosary recital as a child I always resented this waste of my time. In my opinion the adults were not even thinking about the words they were saying. Now I can see that the words are perhaps secondary all along and the primary purpose may be meditative. Wow! Who knew?

  14. #14
    Senior Member Sydney's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by David W View Post
    I read somewhere that chanting the Om mani padme hum mantra or the catholic Rosary ensures that your breathing is around 6 breaths per minute and this then has an amazing impact on brain waves. Being brought up catholic and subjected to Rosary recital as a child I always resented this waste of my time. In my opinion the adults were not even thinking about the words they were saying. Now I can see that the words are perhaps secondary all along and the primary purpose may be meditative. Wow! Who knew?
    I learned how to pray the rosary as an adult atheist and developed a real respect for it. But it doesn't make me leap inside like the heart sutra does.
    Diligently attain nothing. Sort of. Best not to over-think it.
    http://gplus.to/sydneytinker

  15. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by David W View Post
    I read somewhere that chanting the Om mani padme hum mantra or the catholic Rosary ensures that your breathing is around 6 breaths per minute and this then has an amazing impact on brain waves. Being brought up catholic and subjected to Rosary recital as a child I always resented this waste of my time. In my opinion the adults were not even thinking about the words they were saying. Now I can see that the words are perhaps secondary all along and the primary purpose may be meditative. Wow! Who knew?
    Yes, the repetition of a Mantra will tend to be extremely hypnotic and absorbing. The rolling of beads through the fingers (and the sensitive nerve endings at the tips) has a similar effect. I do not doubt the power of the practice. Mesmerizing ... Lovely practice. Many repetitive activities such as running or knitting can bring about a like effect (as can certain drugs), but the combination with a religious focus will tend to bring out some religious experience.

    In Shikantaza, of course, we generally sit without seeking special states, and are radically present with what is. This radical "just what is" if the most special of states! Sometimes deep Samadhi and other like times will come, but that is not what we run after. That is all. We don't knit or take drugs either while sitting Shikantaza.

    Gassho, Jundo
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

    #SAT TODAY!

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