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  1. #1

    Renew precepts at full moon

    Thursday was a full moon. During this phase it is traditional to renew precepts. I regularly do with "a good friend." We have ritual renewal of the bodhisattva precepts.
    For those who have taken precepts: Do you regularly renew at home?


    Below is the ritual that we have established, in french of course, because we are French Buddhists.
    After four great vows we practice zazen time, then we take one of the 10 precepts and discuss together.

    rituel préceptes-2.jpg
    Le secret consiste donc seulement à dire "OUI" et à se jeter dans le vide. Dès lors, il n'y a plus de problème. Il s'agit d'être soi-même dans l'instant présent, toujours soi-même, sans s'accrocher à son vieux moi.
    Shunryu Suzuki Roshi

  2. #2
    This is lovely. and is actually based on one of the oldest Traditions in Buddhism ... the Uposatha. In South Asian Traditions, on New Moon and Full Moon days the Ordained Sangha would gather for fortnightly confession and recitation of the Bhikkhu Patimokkha (monastic rules of conduct).

    http://buddhism.about.com/od/buddhis...g/Uposatha.htm

    In Mahayana, including Zen, monasteries, the custom evolved into Fusatsu, centered on a recital of the Verse of Atonement and the Bodhisattva Precepts as you have on your document (very much as during the Jukai Ceremony). Some Zen Centers in the West follow this custom, or a slightly abbreviated version called "Ryaku Fusatsu" ...

    http://www.prairiewindzen.org/ryaku_fusatsu.html

    In our Sangha, we recite the Verse of Atonement at least during each of our weekly Zazenkai ...

    http://www.treeleaf.org/forums/forum...ENKAI-NETCASTS

    ... hold our Jukai undertaking of the Precepts each year ...

    ... and I hope each person will do as they can to keep the Precepts in their heart each day and live by them.

    Gassho, J
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  3. #3
    Thank you Jundo and Anshu ... I have learned something new today.

    Gassho
    Shingen



    If you cannot find the truth right where you are, where else do you expect to find it?
    ~ Dogen Zenji

  4. #4
    Treeleaf Unsui Dosho's Avatar
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    The moon was so bright last night I could have read the precepts by its light!

    Thank you to all those who keep the precepts in their hearts.

    Gassho,
    Dosho
    Shudo Dosho - Ordained Priest-in-Training
    With your help and guidance from Jundo & Taigu
    I am learning, but please take what I say with a
    grain of salt, especially in matters of the Dharma.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Joyo's Avatar
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    I've never heard of that, but what a beautiful tradition!


    Treena

  6. #6
    I practised the uposatha when I sat with a Burmese Theravadin sangha, taking on 8 precepts on the new & full moons. It was like having a 24 hour Ango twice a month & was a valuable practice.

    _/\_
    Ade

  7. #7
    What a lovely practice! Anshu, thank you for sharing it with us.

    Gassho,
    Kelly/Jinmei

  8. #8
    Senior Member Seizan's Avatar
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    Very beautiful!

    Gassho
    Seizan

  9. #9
    Here is another Tradition in Japanese Buddhism tied to the moon, and happens this week in fact. It is hard to say, though, whether it is truly "B-B-B-Buddhism" or an ancient ancestral worship and agricultural ritual that blended in with Buddhism in China and Japan a thousand years and more ago. Does it really matter?

    In any event, days like this scattered through the year are how "Buddhism/Ancestor Worship" are practiced in the day-to-day lives of ordinary Japanese people, far removed from all such doctrinal questions of what it all means. It is simply a day for the family to come together, as are all holidays.

    ------------------

    In Line with The Far Side- the Equinox Days and the 3 days before and after are O-Higan in Japan- a time to visit ancestral graves
    By Avi Landau

    It is the week of the autumnal equinox, and you might catch a whiff of incense in the air as you are strolling about the old neighborhoods of Tsukuba. Don’t worry, you are not having olfactory hallucinations. You might also notice that the local graveyards have been adorned with fresh flowers and fruits. This is because the 3 days before and after the equinox days in Japan make up the one week periods called O-Higan (お彼岸), which literally means the Other Shore. This is a Buddhist expression refering to the other world, which contrasts with this one, shikan (此岸).

    According to Japanese Buddhist belief, the Pure Land Paradise (極楽浄土,gokuraku jodo) lies in the west, and since the sun rises and sets directly along the east-west axis [to] the west on the equinoxes, around those two days a window of opportunity is opened for contact with departed spirits. That is why this week is a time for the Japanese to continue their ongoing relations and show of affection for their deceased relatives and ancestors.

    Many of your friends, colleagues and acquaintances will be visiting their family graves this week, some of them travelling great distances, for this traditional show of fillial piety called Ohaka-mairi (お墓参り). Some Japanese who have moved far from their natal homes have actually had their ancestors remains tranferred to more conveniently located cemeteries in order to be better able to care for them during ohigan, obon (in August), New Years, and memorial days (命日).

    Ohaka-mairi is a fairly standardized affair now. The living relatives prepare flowers and candles, incense and maybe some favorite foods of the departed. The area around the graves is then swept (many temples always have brooms available). The gravestones are then cleaned. Flowers are placed and water poured into a special hole in the center of the grave. Incense is lit and water is poured over the headstones. Family members then pay their respects by squatting down, and bowing their heads with hands pressed together.

    Another interesting custom which everyone can enjoy, is the eating of special sweets, large oval shaped lumps of sweet beans which are available at department stores, sweet shops, and convenience stores. Strictly speaking, they should be O-Hagi in this season (because the flowers O-Hagi, bush clover, are symbolic of autumn), and Bota-Mochi in spring ( As Botan, peonies, are representative of that season), though I have noticed that many Japanese people always call these sweets O-Hagi and have I have often found that in spring these sweets are mistakenly labelled ohagi at convenience store and supermarkets..

    Keep this in mind when chatting with Japanese friends. You might want to ask them if they did ohaka mairi or enjoyed botamochi. It will probably be highly appreciated!

    Because these amazing flowers bloom right around the time of the autumnal equinox ( O-Higan), they are called Higan-bana in Japanese. You can see them at parks, temples, and most aptly- graveyards
    Because these amazing flowers bloom each year right around the time of the autumnal equinox (O-Higan), they are called higan-bana in Japanese. They can be seen in this season growing along roads, in parks, at temples, and most appropriately- at cemeteries!



    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------

    An explanation from a Soto temple page of the proper way for a family to engage in "Hakamairi ... how to clean the grave, offer water to the thirsty spirits, offer incense and properly bow.

    Last edited by Jundo; 09-22-2013 at 05:46 PM.
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  10. #10
    Senior Member Clark's Avatar
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    I really like the idea of renewing the precepts at the full moon. My astrology buff friends tell me this is a good time to drop habits that no longer serve us. I have long disliked the western term "ancestor worship". This denotes seeing the ancestors as deities. I personally would prefer to see it as "ancestor respect", which I think is a better and more accurate way of looking at the intent of these rituals. In my time in Japan I was introduced to many of these customs and I think our Western culture pales in comparison to the respect given not only to our deceased ancestors but living ones as well. To me it is an aspect of our practice to be reminded of impermanence, and the continual thread of life we are all connected to. I think I will introduce something of my own that does something to honor those before me. A wonderful practice and reminder on both accounts.


    C

  11. #11
    We are now discussing having a day each year to remember our Ancestors ... family, friends, Buddhist ... in a way keeping with the flavor of this Sangha.

    There are several traditional days to choose from, but I am proposing a day on the Buddhist calendar marking Buddha's Pari-Nirvana, in February, as traditionally that day allows us to remember and honor those of the past times ... all while teaching lessons on Impermanence, the preciousness of life ... AND that we Mahayana Buddhists don't quite believe in "death" (or "birth" either) or "past times" or "calendars".

    Anyway, details on that in the coming months as we work out the arrangements.

    Gassho, J
    ALL OF LIFE IS OUR TEMPLE

  12. #12
    Senior Member Clark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    We are now discussing having a day each year to remember our Ancestors ... family, friends, Buddhist ... in a way keeping with the flavor of this Sangha.

    There are several traditional days to choose from, but I am proposing a day on the Buddhist calendar marking Buddha's Pari-Nirvana, in February, as traditionally that day allows us to remember and honor those of the past times ... all while teaching lessons on Impermanence, the preciousness of life ... AND that we Mahayana Buddhists don't quite believe in "death" (or "birth" either) or "past times" or "calendars".

    Anyway, details on that in the coming months as we work out the arrangements.

    Gassho, J
    Sounds like a great idea! I'm in!


  13. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    We are now discussing having a day each year to remember our Ancestors ... family, friends, Buddhist ... in a way keeping with the flavor of this Sangha.

    There are several traditional days to choose from, but I am proposing a day on the Buddhist calendar marking Buddha's Pari-Nirvana, in February, as traditionally that day allows us to remember and honor those of the past times ... all while teaching lessons on Impermanence, the preciousness of life ... AND that we Mahayana Buddhists don't quite believe in "death" (or "birth" either) or "past times" or "calendars".

    Anyway, details on that in the coming months as we work out the arrangements.

    Gassho, J
    I'm with the Sangha, great idea.

    Gassho
    Shingen



    If you cannot find the truth right where you are, where else do you expect to find it?
    ~ Dogen Zenji

  14. #14
    Senior Member Genshin's Avatar
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    Ditto. Sounds like a good idea.

    Gassho
    Matt


    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    We are now discussing having a day each year to remember our Ancestors ... family, friends, Buddhist ... in a way keeping with the flavor of this Sangha.

    There are several traditional days to choose from, but I am proposing a day on the Buddhist calendar marking Buddha's Pari-Nirvana, in February, as traditionally that day allows us to remember and honor those of the past times ... all while teaching lessons on Impermanence, the preciousness of life ... AND that we Mahayana Buddhists don't quite believe in "death" (or "birth" either) or "past times" or "calendars".

    Anyway, details on that in the coming months as we work out the arrangements.

    Gassho, J

  15. #15
    Senior Member Joyo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
    We are now discussing having a day each year to remember our Ancestors ... family, friends, Buddhist ... in a way keeping with the flavor of this Sangha.

    There are several traditional days to choose from, but I am proposing a day on the Buddhist calendar marking Buddha's Pari-Nirvana, in February, as traditionally that day allows us to remember and honor those of the past times ... all while teaching lessons on Impermanence, the preciousness of life ... AND that we Mahayana Buddhists don't quite believe in "death" (or "birth" either) or "past times" or "calendars".

    Anyway, details on that in the coming months as we work out the arrangements.

    Gassho, J
    I also agree, great idea. And this post has motivated me to renew the precepts at each full moon as well. What a great way to be connected to nature, and connected to our Zen path.


    Treena

  16. #16
    Senior Member Amelia's Avatar
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    I like the idea, too.
    迎 Geika

  17. #17
    Yes, very good idea. Since we tend to forget so easely and rather stay away from things related with or that confront us with death, I think it is a very valuable practice. I for one will observe it. There are some graves I will never be able to go to but other I can. Good initiative Jundo!

    Gassho

    E.

  18. #18
    Treeleaf Unsui Myozan Kodo's Avatar
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    Great! Like the idea of a day of remembrance.
    Deep bows
    Myozan
    Myozan Kodo
    Ordained Soto Zen Priest in Training
    Dublin, Ireland

    As a trainee priest, please take any commentary by me on matters of the Dharma with a pinch of salt.
    "Here the way unfolds."

  19. #19
    As with Adrian's Theravadin experience, the Tibetan traditions I have been involved with also have precept days on both the new and full moon. The precepts and Bodhisattva vow are recited at dawn and the day lived according to monastic precepts.

    I like the idea of having an ancestral remembrance day. I currently do this according to my own ancestral calendar on Samhuinn/All Hallow's. Making it a sangha event on Parinirvana day would be lovely. The coldness of February would seem to add to such an occasion

    Old Buddhism, new traditions.

    Gassho
    Andy

  20. #20
    Senior Member Sekishi's Avatar
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    I started observing Uposatha a few years ago, at least one day during the full moon and often the new moon. I continue this practice today (usually solo, but occasionally with some other folks). It is a beautiful and valuable practice for me personally: a day to reconnect with vows, do a little sutra study, do lots of sitting, and (for me anyhow) to observe noble silence.

    As a tangentially related topic, the last practice of observing noble silence for a day is vital to me. Thought and speech and action are so interconnected. How valuable it is to spend a day in silence, letting thoughts go without ever actualizing them as sound / spoken words (particularly if you must pass through the world where beings are conversing).

    Anyhow, I guess I do not want to say too much about it all since it is not necessarily part of our practice here, but Uposatha, and silent retreat are both beautiful practices to me.

    Gassho,
    Eric

  21. #21
    Senior Member Heishu's Avatar
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    Happy to see this coming, thank you Jundo.

    Gassho,
    Heishu


    “Blessed are the flexible, for they never get bent out of shape." Author Unknown

  22. #22
    For those who have taken precepts: Do you regularly renew at home?
    I do, on the full moon. As Jundo says, I try my best to to keep the Precepts in my heart each day and live by them. However, my effort rarely measures up to my aspiration. My practice more closely resembles one continuous mistake rather than that of a Bodhisattva. Ryaku Fusatsu (or the Repentance Gatha) is not an exercise in self-flagellation, but an opportunity to reflect upon and acknowledge points where I have missed the mark, make necessary corrections, and renew and recommit myself to my Jukai vows.
    Of all my ritualistic practices, this is the most meaningful to me, and other than zazen, contributes the most to the deepening and broadening of my practice.
    May all beings everywhere plagued with sufferings of body and mind
    quickly be freed from their illnesses.
    May those frightened cease to be afraid
    and may those bound be free.
    May the powerless find power
    and may people think of befriending one another.

  23. #23
    I go for the everyday precept renewal. Using part of my mornig to do it. Let me explain, 6 years ago I took the precepts with a tibetan buddhist tradition, although I no longer have contact with them, I still hold and honor the precepts every day of mi life.

    Now, I look forward to Jukai to renew the precepts I vowed with my heart and mind 6 years ago and for life and to re-take them with all of you, and specially with my brother Kyonin in my new Dharma House.

    By the way, my Dharma name with the tibetan folks is Kelsang.

    Gassho.

    kb
    Last edited by kidbuda; 09-26-2013 at 04:47 AM. Reason: bad spellig
    Meditate and Defy.

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