Tugas Gunadarma Gunadarma Tutorial VB.NET Download OST Anime Soundtrack Anime Opening Anime Ending Anime OST Anime Japan Download Lagu Anime Jepang

  • Recent Articles

    Kyonin

    The Lineage: A Continuing History...

    The history of Zen Buddhism presents itself as a family saga. Each priest of the Sôtô school today belongs to an uninterrupted line which traces itself either to Gasan Jôseki Zenji (1276-1366) or to Meihô Sotetsu Zenji (1277-1350), two disciples of Keizan Zenji, all other Japanese lines having since become extinct. One is integrated into a lineage at the time of the ceremony of Transmission of the Dharma, by which the Master makes the Disciple his successor. Presented here is the chain of teachers that connects Eihei Dôgen Zenji to Gudo Nishijima Roshi, and in the 41st generation from Dogen, Jundo James Cohen of the Treeleaf Zendo. As well, its links are said to reach back in time through China and India, on to the historical Buddha, Śhākyamuni. The line is also closely associated, ever since the middle of the 15th century, with the temple Tôkei' in, located near to the Japanese town of Shizuoka. It is a long, yet continuing history. In an important sense, it is not to be limited to any place or nation, nor is it merely a timeline which flows from past to present: In Dogen’s teachings, past is present is future, while the future flows into the past as the past becomes the future. In this way, each teacher stands for all others, and all are with us now.

    References: For a history of the development of Zen in Japan, please refer to William Bodiford, Sôtô Zen in Medieval Japan... read more
    Kyonin 11-18-2014, 10:40 PM
    Kyonin

    INTRODUCING ‘BLUE MOUNTAIN WHITE CLOUDS HERMITAGE’

    We are pleased to introduce our Friend and Brother Community, BLUE MOUNTAIN WHITE CLOUDS HERMITAGE, established by Rev. Taigu Turlur,... read more
    Kyonin 11-18-2014, 10:28 PM
  • SIT-A-LONG with JUNDO: Sex Scandal Finger Wagging

    I want to wag my finger, not just at the Zen teachers caught in scandals recently (although at most of them too), but at the reactions of some folks to the scandals. Particularly, I want to call out:

    Those folks ... some of them fellow Buddhist priests or moderators of Buddhist forums ... who would seek to ignore, hide or explain away some of these scandals, like sweeping dirt under a rug. Shame on them, shame on all of us, and we are contributing in part to these things if we do not look them square on.

    But at the same time, I wish to question those folks who would lump all these so called "sex scandals" together ... both the few (very few!) true predators, date rapists, serial seducers and other abusers who misuse their role and influence as "teachers" ... and those other folks who may have fallen into a very ordinary intimate affair between grown, mature consenting adults. All are not cut from the same cloth, and the second group should not be treated the same as the first. I most certainly agree that a teacher should almost never commence a sexual relationship with a student ... much as a psychologist should never have a sexual relationship with a patient ... because of the potential disparity in power, trust, psychological influence and vulnerability between the parties. I also agree that those married clergy who fall into extra-marital affairs have cause to reflect on their actions in light of their marriage vows. But the fact of the matter is that Japanese Lineage clergy are not generally celibate, and there will be cases truly between consenting adults with no misuse or important trigger in the power, position or influence of the teacher as teacher or serious moral offense beyond someone breaking their marriage vows. While I see every reason to criticize ... and possibly suspend or punish ... the predators and power abusers, I see little reason to treat the same way every case the same way, and let's be careful in distinguishing which is which.

    I also wag my finger at those folks who profess to have lost their trust in all Zen or Buddhist Teachers because of the missteps of a few. Baloney! A few bad apples to not spoil the whole apple orchard, and the fact is that most Buddhist Teachers I know are sincere, honest, dedicated, committed folks who generally would not hurt a fly.

    I also tisk tisk those folks who think that, because a Zen Master shows any failing at all ... from losing his cool from time to time, showing some weakness in personality, having some vice ... that completely disqualifies the teacher from all right and entitlement to teach (let along teach well!). Such a view is typical of the Zen idealists out there, looking for perfect Zen teachers without a fault or failing, who think that "Enlightenment" means never making a mistake in the words out of one's mouth, and never having a "bad hair day" again. TIME TO COME DOWN FROM THE CLOUDS! I would say that, if you are looking for a good Zen guide, find a man or woman who sometimes falls down, makes mistakes, makes a donkey's ass of him or herself... and observe closely what happens, watch how he or she does it. Oh, don't get me wrong... probably you do not want as a teacher someone who falls down each and every day, nor someone who falls down too BIG (robbing banks, lying profusely and intentionally starting fires, for example ... nor the few aforesaid predators or serial seducers). No, I mean someone who... every so often, now and then, like everyone... makes a fool of him/herself, loses his Zen Master cool, over-indulges, does a real face-flop, says something she regrets, breaks some (hopefully not too big) Precepts in some very human way. Observe how does this person recover their balance? With what grace do they fall or, at least, get back up on their feet? Do they profoundly reflect on their mistakes, learn from them, apologize sincerely to anyone hurt (hopefully not too badly) ... and move on? As a matter of fact, since this crazy practice is greatly about living with some grace in this imperfect, often disappointing, trap and temptation filled world, a teacher with a couple of serious imperfections may be a good guide on how to avoid, lessen or escape the worst of it!

    That leads me, finally, to cluck cluck at two corollary misconceptions about Zen Teachers:

    The first misconception is that Zen Teachers ... Zen Masters ... are ever supposed to be as perfect as a Buddha, beyond all error and mistake, totally one with the universe, always doing what is to be done in every situation, always speaking with a Buddha's tongue, never possibly to trip or fall, at total peace and harmony and wholeness with all this self-life-world, each and all Golden Buddhas and Perfect Jewels. Hockey-pucks! That is the view of some overly idealistic folks who have read too many Lineage Legends and Sutra story books in which our religious heroes and icons ... after being dead and gone ... are dipped in gold and polished up into super-human characters. Sure, as in any religion, we have many TRULY saintly and inspired, enlightened and enlightening folks in our Tradition, living and dead. However, most of the image of "Zen Master" is a bit of religious hype and propaganda.

    In my view, a "master" is someone with some "mastery" in an art or tradition to practice, pass on and pass down ... from carpentry to medicine to martial arts to Zen Buddhary. It need not mean the "master" is perfect and never errs. One can be a "master carpenter", yet not every corner will always be smooth; a "master surgeon" and lifesaver of thousands, yet sometimes make a bad cut, bungled diagnosis or deadly error. However, one should be pretty darn skilled in applying the art in life, and much more skilled and competent than those without the skills required. As in mastery in the martial arts, there is no technique in Zen for never being hit or never losing one's footing ... let alone for winning every battle ... there is no training offered on how to never fall, but rather, endless training on how to fall well. Show me the man or woman who encounters life's obstacles, sunny and rainy days, loops and losses, ups and downs ... all the mess and mayhem of Samsara ... who may be sometimes knocked sideways or down ... but who demonstrates how to be hit well and recover one's footing ... and I will show you a great Zen teacher.

    One of the unfortunate aspects of religion is the tendency to put the leader or "guru" on a pedestal as being perfect, beyond any and all human failing ... always wise, never saying the wrong thing, always balanced and in control. The Lineage legends and Sutra story books tend to dip in gold and place on pedestals all our long dead ancestors, scrubbing them of every human failing. I think that unfortunate. Plenty of wannabe cult leaders are ready to play to such an image even now ... and plenty of "need a daddy to tell me what to do" students are ever willing to buy into it. That is a shame.

    In fact, there are really no "Zen Teachers" ... for Zen cannot be taught. The "Teachers" are more like experienced "Dharma Friends" offering tips and coaching to help the seeker do all the heavy lifting ... and sitting ... on their own.

    No, there are no Zen masters who are as perfect as a Buddha, beyond all error and mistake, totally one with the universe, always doing what is to be done in every situation, always speaking with a Buddha's tongue, never possibly to trip or fall, at total peace and harmony and wholeness with all this self-life-world, each and all a Golden Buddha and Perfect Jewel.[/B]

    But that leads to the last misconception:

    For, in fact, all Zen masters are as perfect as a Buddha, beyond all error and mistake, totally one with the universe, always doing what is to be done in every situation, always speaking with a Buddha's tongue, never possibly to trip or fall, at total peace and harmony and wholeness with all this self-life-world, each and all Golden Buddhas and Perfect Jewels.

    Sound like a contradiction? (Zen had lots of those!)

    You see, so are you ... and all people ... and every mountain and tree and star! Each and All Buddha, Beyond Error and Mistake, totally at one piece and harmony and wholeness with the universe, all preaching with a Buddha's tongue, with no place possibly to fall etc. etc. "Enlightenment" is a realization that there is no place to fall, ultimately no self to stumble, no "mistake" that can ever be made. All things are Perfect Jewels in their way, Whole. That is true. But it is just as true that there is no place to fall, no stumbling or possible mistake... even as we may fall and stumble and make mistakes!

    The Zen Master should simply realize (know and embody) that fact more than the average bloke ... and hopefully have some skill in helping her students realize such too in their lives.

    Here is my further rambling on this topic ...

    This article was originally published in forum thread: SIT-A-LONG with JUNDO: Sex Scandal Finger Wagging started by Jundo View original post
    Comments 41 Comments
    1. Myozan Kodo's Avatar
      Myozan Kodo -
      Hi Jundo,
      Thank you for this talk. It reminds me why I am with Treeleaf sangha.
      Thank you.
      Myozan
    1. Dosho's Avatar
      Dosho -
      Jundo,

      Thank you for this teaching...especially for an inexperienced unsui such as myself who seems to fall into traps of perfectionism and overthinking again and again. If I do become a priest someday, it will be because I have accepted that I will not become some perfect being who never falls into those traps ever again! And nor would I want to because that would make me so full of myself I'd be of little use to anyone.

      Gassho,
      Dosho
    1. Daido's Avatar
      Daido -
      Jundo,

      Thank you for your commitment to transparency to our sangha and the dharma. A great lesson. All of life is our temple.

      Gassho,

      Daido
    1. Risho's Avatar
      Risho -
      That was awesome! Thank you.

      When you say "ALL Zen masters (even the predators and abusers!) are as perfect as a Buddha", do you mean that from a perspective of emptiness or capacity? For example that those individuals have the capacity to be a Buddha even if their actions betray that Buddha nature? I always get hung up on that perspective.

      Gassho,

      Risho
    1. Seimyo's Avatar
      Seimyo -
      Quote Originally Posted by Daido View Post
      Jundo,

      Thank you for your commitment to transparency to our sangha and the dharma. A great lesson. All of life is our temple.

      Gassho,

      Daido
      Just as Daido said. A very fair perspective and talk.

      Thank you. Gassho,
      Chris
    1. Taigu's Avatar
      Taigu -
      Gassho, Bro ,from a crooked teacher, a Jack of all trades and a master of none.


      Taigu
    1. Koshin's Avatar
      Koshin -
      Thank you Jundo

      I am so happy to be part of a Sangha where we can talk so freely about this issues. After all, as Daido says, ALL of life...

      Gassho
    1. Jundo's Avatar
      Jundo -
      Quote Originally Posted by Risho View Post
      When you say "ALL Zen masters (even the predators and abusers!) are as perfect as a Buddha", do you mean that from a perspective of emptiness or capacity? For example that those individuals have the capacity to be a Buddha even if their actions betray that Buddha nature? I always get hung up on that perspective.

      Gassho,

      Risho
      Yes, that is what I mean. There are folks all over the place who may have a "masterful" realization of the pristine wholeness of Emptiness and such, but yet are absolutely unmasterful at putting that to practice in life. Or masterful sometimes about putting that to practice in life, but not at other times or ways in life (all of us really).

      That's why they call it "Practice" ... and awakening to the allness of "realization" is not all, and is to be followed by "realization" (making it real) by how one lives life. That's the tricky part.

      Gassho, J
    1. Shingen's Avatar
      Shingen -
      Jundo ... thank you for this teaching. Like others have said, I like how you talk about the "tuff" or "sore" spots and do it with grace, compassion, and clarity.

      Gassho
      Michael

      Sent from my Nexus 7 using Tapatalk 2
    1. Ronchan's Avatar
      Ronchan -
      Thank you, Jundo

      Gassho
      Ronald
    1. Shokai's Avatar
      Shokai -
      Jundo; I'll say it again, I love your passion. Thank you for this incisive teaching.
    1. Daizan's Avatar
      Daizan -
      Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
      I would say that, if you are looking for a good Zen guide, find a man or woman who sometimes falls down, makes mistakes, makes a donkey's ass of him or herself... and observe closely what happens, watch how he or she does it. Oh, don't get me wrong... probably you do not want as a teacher someone who falls down each and every day, nor someone who falls down too BIG (robbing banks, lying profusely and intentionally starting fires, for example ... nor the few aforesaid predators or serial seducers). No, I mean someone who... every so often, now and then, like everyone... makes a fool of him/herself, loses his Zen Master cool, over-indulges, yields to temptation, does a real face-flop, says something she regrets, breaks some (hopefully not too big) Precepts in some very human way. [B]Observe how does this person recover their balance? With what grace do they fall and, more importantly, get back up on their feet? Do they profoundly reflect on their mistakes, learn from them, apologize sincerely to anyone hurt (hopefully not too badly) ... and move on? As a matter of fact, since this crazy practice is greatly about living with some grace in this imperfect, often disappointing, trap and temptation filled world, a teacher with a couple of serious imperfections may be a good guide on how to avoid, lessen or escape the worst of it!
      Thank you, Jundo, for this beautiful teaching. Grace in face-flops, recovering, and moving on.


      Gassho, kojip
    1. willow's Avatar
      willow -
      Jundo - thank you for this down to earth teaching.

      Gassho

      Willow
    1. kosen's Avatar
      kosen -
      "As in mastery in the martial arts, there is no technique in Zen for never being hit or never losing one's footing ... let alone for winning every battle ... there is no training offered on how to never fall, but rather, endless training on how to fall well. "
      Great teaching, thank you.
      Kosen.
    1. Marla567's Avatar
      Marla567 -
      Hi Jundo,

      thank you for this teaching. I wanted to believe in infallible Buddhist masters a very long time, but perhaps this was just the hope to get rid of my own responsibility for what I do ;-)

      I once visited a workshop for ancient meditation practices at the University of Hamburg in Germany and we had a discussion about the infallibility of the Buddha himself with the help of a text of the Pali-Canon:

      Vesali sutta SN V 320 (http://www.accesstoinsight.org/tipit....009.than.html)

      The questions of the workshop were:
      Is this story just fiction? Did the Buddha teach the wrong practice (to the wrong people at the wrong place)? Had this teaching a special meaning beyond our imagination? Or was it just the fault of the students, who exaggerated this practice?

      Gassho
      Bianca
    1. Kyonin's Avatar
      Kyonin -
      Thank you, Jundo. I should play this video to my aunt.

      Gassho,

      Kyonin
    1. Risho's Avatar
      Risho -
      Quote Originally Posted by Jundo View Post
      Yes, that is what I mean. There are folks all over the place who may have a "masterful" realization of the pristine wholeness of Emptiness and such, but yet are absolutely unmasterful at putting that to practice in life. Or masterful sometimes about putting that to practice in life, but not at other times or ways in life (all of us really).

      That's why they call it "Practice" ... and awakening to the allness of "realization" is not all, and is to be followed by "realization" (making it real) by how one lives life. That's the tricky part.

      Gassho, J
      Thank you... yep that is damned tricky. I just explode sometimes (not physically aggressive) but a habitual outburst of anger when I don't get my way. It's easy to point fingers, but it's a lot more difficult to look at our own habits as you more eloquently put at the end of your talk. Thank you very much.

      Gassho,

      Risho
    1. Saijun's Avatar
      Saijun -
      Hello,

      Thank you for this. Always good to remember that even the masters fall sometime.

      Metta and Gassho,

      Saijun
    1. Kaishin's Avatar
      Kaishin -
      Thank you, Jundo.
    1. adrianbkelly's Avatar
      adrianbkelly -
      Thank you Jundo, for a reasoned & reasonable response to a highly emotive subject.

      _/\_

      Ade
  • Recent Forum Posts

    Kokuu

    No 'I' ... No 'Know'...

    ' Sit down and be quiet; let this stillness and silence begin to repair the cracks in the universe. '

    I love this too. Beautiful!

    Kokuu Today, 11:41 AM Go to last post
    willow

    No 'I' ... No 'Know'...

    ' Sit down and be quiet; let this stillness and silence begin to repair the cracks in the universe. '


    Beautiful words Lisa, thank

    willow Today, 10:27 AM Go to last post
    vanMeerdervoort

    No 'I' ... No 'Know'...

    That sure was a good read
    Happy morning to all whenever the first occasion arises!

    Gassho

    Vincent
    Sat today

    vanMeerdervoort Today, 07:21 AM Go to last post
    Myosha

    Stop, look, go

    Hello,

    Thank you for the link.


    Gassho,
    Myosha sat today

    Myosha Today, 07:20 AM Go to last post
    David W

    Stop, look, go

    Dear all,
    I came across this talk by Brother David Steindl-Rast
    today on TED talks. There is really nothing in it that is different to what Jundo

    David W Today, 07:10 AM Go to last post